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Full text of "North Carolina State Colored Normal School Catalog"

Office of the Registrar 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



http://archive.org/details/northcaroli1902060809 



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1302—1903. 

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CATALOGUE 



TWENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL SESSION 



OF THE 



NORTH CAROLINA 

STATE COLORED s dt 
S 4 NORMAL SCHOOL 

FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 

FOR THE YEAR 1902-1903. 



FATETIEVILLE, N. C. 
N. Q. BAPTIST PUB. CO. 

1903. 



STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION. 



GOVERNOR C. B. AYCOCK President. 

HON. W. D TURNER Lieutenant-Governor. 

HON. J. BRYAN GRIMES Secretary of State. 

HON. B. R. LACY Treasurer 

HON. B. F. DIXON Auditor. 

HON. R. D. GILMER Attorney-General. - 

HON. J.Y. JOYNER, Supt. Pub. In, Secretary 



LOCAL BOARD OF MANAGERS. 



HON. H. L. COOK Chairman. 

MR. Q. K. NIMOCKS Secretary. 

DR. H W. LILLY Treasurer. 

DR. J. VANCE McGOUGAN. 
MR. D. H. RAY, 



FACULTY. 

E. E. SMITH, A. M. Ph. D., Principal, 
English Literature and Pedagogy. 

EDWARD EVANS, A. M., Assistant Principal. 
Mathematics and Physical Geography. 

J. F. K. SIMPSON, A. M. 

English Language and Physiology. 

MISS ROWENA B. JACOBS, 
History and Geography. 

MISS MAMIE WADDELL, 

Sewing. 



Students from the advanced classes were appointed 
by the Principal from time to time to conduct recitations. 



STUDENTS. 



Alford, M A. C , 
Anderson, Mary A., 
Armstrong, Marion A., 
Baldwin, Hannah E . , 
Barney, Caroline, 
Bayne, Florrie, 
Bayne, M. Lee, 
Bayne, Rosa I., 
Billing, Mattie, 
Bonds, J. P., 
Bowen, A. L., 
Boykin, J. E., 
Boykin, Lillie C, 
Boykin, Sallie D , 
Brown, B. M., 
Brown, J. S., 
Brown, Nettie, 
Broadfoot, Florrie H., 
Bryant, Susie A., 
Bunn, Henrietta, 
Bunn, Ida G., 
Bunn, Mamie E., 
Butler. F. L., 
Byrd, Bertha J., 
Byrd, Louisa, 
Carter, Joel, 
Carter, Napoleon, 
Carver, Peter, 
Chestnutt, H. C, 
Cogdell, J. B , 
Cole, Margaret, 
Covington, E. D., 
Covington, Garfield, 
Covington, Susie, 
Cromartie, L. J , 
Crumpler, M. G., 



Smithfield, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Alderman, 

Fayetteville, 

Thomas, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Lumber Bridge, 

Laurinburg, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Elizabeth City, 

Edonia, 

Edonia, 

Edonia, 

Fayetteville, 

Wade, 

Beard, 

Vander, 

Vander, 

Alderman, 

Fayetteville, 

Alderman, 

Dial, 

Lumber Bridge, 

Rockingham, 

Fayetteville, 

Willis' Creek, 

Beard, 



N. C. 



Drake, J. F., 
Dunn, C. W., 
Dunn, E P., 
Dunn, R. N. , 
Evans, Edward, Jr., 
Evans, Effie, 
Evans, Ida J , 
Evans, Stella, 
Evans, M. E., 
Fairley, R. A , 
Fisher, G. H., 
Freeman, Alice, 
Gainey, Mary A., 
Gill, J. C, 
Godwin, J. E., 
Goodman, C. B., 
Goodman, F. K. , 
Hall, Charlotte, 
Hall, Theresa, 
Halliday, Floyd, 
Halliday, Theresa, 
Harris, J. D., 
Heck, Sallie J., 
Henderson, A. J., 
Inghram, Josephine, 
Jeffers, Temeisa, 
Johnson, Lena A., 
Kirk, Harriet, 
McDaniel, A. V., 
McDonald, M. E., 
McLauchlin, W. H., 
McKay, Archie, 
McKay, Irene, 
McKay, M. E., 
McKay, Pinkev, 
McMillan, G. W., 
McMillan, H. T., 
McNair, Herbert, 
McNair, Maggie, 
McNeill, M. E. B., 
McNeill, E. V., 
McPhail, Ada G., 
McPhail, Rachel, 
Melchor, W. C, 
Mitchell, J. W., 



Alderman, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Beard, 

Beard, 

Beard, 

Hope Mills, 

Gray's Creek, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Alderman, 

Alderman, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Benson, 

Sanford, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Favetteville, 

Alderman, 

Alderman, 

Ashley Heights, 

Alderman, 

Alderman, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Dial, 

Dial, 

Beard, 

Red Springs, 

Alderman, 

Alderman, 

Hope Mills, 

Fayetteville, 

Wade, 

Wade, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 



N. C. 



Mitchell, T. J., 
Monds, C- F., 
Morrison, Christian, 
Murchison, A. A., 
Pearce, Lena, 
Perry, Hattie, 
Perry, J S., 
Poe, Abram, 
Poe, Addie, 
Ray, E. L., 
Ray, F. A , 
Reeves, Rosetta, 
Robinson, 8. J., 
Robinson, Stella, 
Sampson, Sadie E. 
Shaw, Jennie V., 
Simmons, Alberta, 
Simmons, Rowena, 
Simpson, Annie, 
Simpson, J. L , 
Smith, A. H., 
Smith, D P., 
Smith, G. W., 
Smith, Irene, 
Smith, M E., 
Smith, Purdie, 
Smith, W J.. 
Spaulding, L. J., 
Taylor, C. C , 
Thaggard, S. W , 
Tyson, Lizzie, 
White, Christiana, 
White, Harlena, 
Wilder, C. 0-, 
Williams, E. S., 
Williams, G. H., 
Williams, Hattie L. , 
Williams, Hattie, 
Williams, Ethel, 
Williams, Lillie EL, 
Williams, W. A., 
Wood, Lena A , 



Fayetteville, 

Godwin, 

Dial, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Dial, 

Dial, 

Fayetteville, 

Cedar, 

Fayetteville, 

Wilmington, 

Elizabethtown, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Populi, 

Autryville, 

Idaho, 

Idaho, 

Idaho, 

Idaho, 

Sherwood, 

Idaho, 

Idaho, 

Whiteville, 

Bland, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Elease, 

Fayetteville, 

'' ayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Manchester, 

Fayetteville, 



SUMMARY. 



No. of males enrolled in the Normal Department 46 

No. of females enrolled in the Normal Department 79 

Total enrollment in the Normal Department 125 

Duration of session in weeks 36 

No holding teacher's certificate 53 

No. having taught in Public Schools 49 

No. looking forward to teach 76 

No of counties represented in the Normal 14 

Towns or Postoffices represented in the Normal 41 

Average age of students 17 

No. completing course of study this year 8 



CLASSIFICATION. 
First Year. 



Temeisa Jeffers 

E. P. Dunn 
Floyd Halliday 
E L. Ray 

C. W. Dunn 
Stella Robinson 
Lena Pearce 

F. A. Ray 

C. B. Goodman 
F. K Goodman 
Hattie Williams 
Lillie C. Boykin 
H. C. Chestnutt 
Susie Covington 
Lizzie Tysor 
Hattie Perry 
Mary A. Gainey 
Ella V. McNeill 
M. A Armstrong 
L. J. Comartie 
Selena Melvin 
Susie Bryant 
Ada G McPhail 
J. P. Bonds 
Daisy Robinson 
Wayman Williams 
Ethel R. Williams 



Herbert McNair 
Garfield Covington 
Abram Poe 
Louisa Byrd 
Lee A Brown 
J. D. Harris 
Stella Evans 
Isabella Mackey 
Mary A. Anderson 
Addie Poe 
George H. Williams 
H. A. McAllister 
Hannah E Baldwin 
W. C. Melchor 
Caroline Barney 
Annie Murchison 
Irene C McKay 
Margaret Cole 
Annie Simpson 
Mattie Billings 
Flora L. butler 
Nettie Brown 
Josephine Inghram 
C. F. Monds 
Archie McKay 
Margaret D. Hill 



Second Year, 



Pinkney McKay 
Rowena Simmons 
Alice Freeman 
Effie Evans 
May E. Smith 
Lena A Wood 
E. D. Covington 
Charlotte Hall 



Rosetta Reeves 
Christian White 
Ida J. Evans 
Minnie McDonald 
Florrie Bavne 
G. W. McMillan 
E. B. McNeill 
Sadie Sampson 



S. J. Robinson 
W. H. McLauchlin 

B. M Brown 
Edward Evans 
Irene D. Smith 

C. A. Wilder 

S. W. Thaggard 
FlorrieH.Broadfoot 
Theresa Halliday 
J. L. Simpson 
Christian Morrison 
H. T. McMillan 
Lena Johnson 



G. W. Smith- 
Purdie Smith 
E. S. Williams 
J. B. Cogdell 
Willie A. Williams 
G. H. Fisher 
Ralph Dunn 
Napoleon Carter 
A L. Bowen 
Mary E. McKay 
Henrietta Bunn 
Ida Bunn 



Third Year* 



T J. Mitchell 
Sallie D. Boykin 
J. C. Gill 
Minnie Williams 
J. W. Mitchell 
Alberta Simmons 
Harriet Kirk- 
Jennie V. Shaw 



Lillie H. Williams 
Cherry C. Taylor 
Robbie A. Fairley 
A. J. Henderson 
A. H. Smith 
M. C. Alford 
Sallie J. Heck 
A. V. McDaniel 



Fourth Year, 



Theodosia Hall 
Rosa I. Ba ne 
Harlena White 
Mattie L. McDougald 
Hattie L. Williams 
Bertha J. Byrd 



J. E. Boykin 
M. G. Crumpler 
D. P. Smith 
Peter Carver 
J. F Drake 
W. J. Smith 



w 



CURRICULUM. 



First 


Year. 




FALL 


TERM. 


Arithmetic, 


5 recitations 


English Grammar, 


3 


* 


Composition, 


2 


' 


Reading, 


5 


< 


United States History, 


3 


t 


Geography, 


2 


< 


Civil Government, 


3 




Spelling, 


5 


1 


Writing, 


2 


t 


Drawing, 


2 


1 


Vocal Music, 


5 


Spring Term, same course 


) as 


Fall Term. 




Second Year. 





per wpek. 



FALL 


TERM. 






Arithmetic, 


5 


recitations 


per wee 


English Grammar, 

Composition, 

Reading, 


3 

2 

5 


ic 

a 


(t it 


United States History, 

Geography, 

Civil Government, /■ 


3 

2 
3 


a 
a 


c. a 
t< a 


Spelling, 
Drawing, 
Writing, 
Vocal Music, 


5 
3 

1 
5 


'< 


it a 
it a 
ft a 

it it 


Spring Term the same. 









10 
Third Year. 



FALL TERM. 




Algebra, 3 


recitations per we< 


Arithmetic, 2 


a a (i 


Composition, 3 


" " " 


English Grammar, 2 


" " '* 


Reading and English Literature, 5 


" " " 


North Carolina History, 3 


(t >( . < 


Methods of Teaching, 2 


l, << a 


History of Education, 3 


a ct i< 


Physiology, 2 


" " " 


Civil Government, 2 


" " '« 


Spelling, 5 


" " " 


Vocal Music 5 




SPRING TERM. 




Algebra, 3 
Arithmetic, 2 
English Grammar, 2 


recitations per we< 

(( 4. (4 


it ( i ti 


Composition, 3 


" " " 


Reading and English Literature, 5 


'' " " 


North Carolina History, 3 


it 1 < K 


Methods of Teaching, 2 


" " " 


History of Education, 3 


' ' < 4 11 


Phyisical Geography, 2 


" '' " 


Civil Government, 2 


I • < < 11 


Spelling, 5 


t: n c« 


Vocal Music, 5 


• < < •• t > 


Fourth Year. 





FALL TERM. 

General History. 

Algebra Continued. 

English Literature. 

Methods of Teaching. 

History of Education. 

Physical Geography. 

Frequent Reviews of the Common School Branches. 



11 

Sewing taught to females. 

Course of study for the Spring Term same as that 
for Fall Term. 



The above course of study, comprising four years, 
having been adopted for the school by the State Board 
of Examiners, has been strictly followed. A number of 
industries will be taught, beginning with the next ses- 
sion, including carpentry, masonry and farming, to the 
males, and sewing and cooking to the females. 




STATE COLORED NORMAL SCHOOL, 
FAYETTEVILLE, N. G 



HISTORY. 



This Institution was established by the State Board 
of Education under an Act of the General Assembly of 
1876-'77, for the training of teachers for the Negro schools 
of the State. It has completed twenty six sessions of 
nine months each, in which 1,277 different students, 
from seventy-two different counties in the State, have 
been enrolled. 

One hundred and fifty-four have completed the pre- 
scribed course and have received diplimas of graduation. 
Of this number only a few have failed to devote them- 
selves to educational work. A number of the under- 
graduates also engage in teaching. The character of 
the work accomplished in the school is exerting an influ- 
ence for good throughout the State. 

LOCATION. 

The School, just as soon as possible, will be located 
in new and larger buildings, situated in the Western 
suburbs ot the city, upon an elevated plat of land, over- 
looking the city. This land, comprising several acres, 
has been donated to the Local Board of Managers as a 
site for the Colored Normal School by Mr. Dwight Ash- 
ley. Fayetteville is a healthy and pleasant city, and is 
rapidly becoming a great industrial, technical and com- 
mercial centre. It is entered by railroads from five dif- 
ferent directions, on each of which numbers of trains 
arrive and depart daily. These, with the facilities 
afforded by the steamboat lines, which ply the Cape 
Fear River, render the city easily accessible. 

Qualifications for Admission, 

Every applicant for admission must present evidence 
of good moral character, read intelligently in the Fifth 



13 

Reader; write a legible hand; spell ordinary English 
words; have a fair knowledge of the Primary History of 
the United States; pass an examination in Arithmetic, 
through common and decimal fractions; possess a know- 
ledge of Elementary Geography. 

Students must promise, upon becoming members of 
the School, to observe the Rules and Regulations, to 
prouide themselves with books necessary for their in- 
struction. 



BOARDING. 



Board, from $5 to $7 per month. 

GENERAL REGULATIONS. 

Particular attention is called to the following points: 

1. Students who do not board at home or at the 
school, are expected to consult the President before se- 
lecting boarding places. 

2. Ladies and Gentlemen will not be permitted to 
board in the same family. This rule shall apply equal- 
ly where the house is occupied by two or more families. 

3. Permission must be obtained in every case where 
pupils desire to board in families where boarders are 
taken who are not connected with the school. 

4. Brothers and sisters will be allowed to board in 
the same house, provided no other boarders are receiv- 
ed into the house. 

5. Students will not be expected to change their 
boarding places without consulting the Principal. 

6 When students engage a boarding house it will 
be understood that they are to remain in that place un- 
til the end of the current term, unless a specific bargain 
to the contrary is made. 

7. Every means will be taken to secure suitable 
boarding places? for such students as desire this service, 
and families in which students board will be encourag- 
ed to report the least departure from perfect ladylike 
and gentlemanly conduct 

8. Pupils may receive calls on Friday and Satur- 
day evenings from 6 o'clock to 9 o'clock, and on other 
days out of study hours. 

Tuition is free to all residents of the State. 



14 

NATURE AND DESIGN. 

A Normal School is neither a college, a law, nor a 
theological school, but a school for the thorough in- 
struction AND SYSTEMATIC TRAINING OF STUDENTS WHO 

wish to become teachers; hence, the design of this 
school is — 

I. Thorough instruction in all branches required 
to be taught in Public Schools of the State 

II. The best methods of teaching these branches 
and governing the schools; and, 

III. The cultivation of the habit of thinking clear- 
ly and systematically, and the practice of delivering 
the thoughts and explanations in a lucid and pleasant 
manner. To accomplish this our course of study, prac- 
tice in teacning, library and rhetorical exercises are 
admirably adapted. 

QUALIFICATIONS OF A GOOD TEACHER. 

1st. Good health, good common sense and sound 
judgement. 

2nd. A thourough knowledge of the branches he 
proposes to teach. 

3rd. Aptness to teach. He may be rich in know- 
ledge, but it will be of little value to his pupils unless he 
has the skill of communicating it. 

4th. Perfect self-control. He cannot govern oth- 
ers when unable to govern himself. 

5th. Love for his calling. Any work is easily 
done when prompted by love. Whatever one does will- 
ingly is no trouble 

EXAMINATIONS, 

Oral and Written Examinations of all students will 
be held during the first week of each term, and Public 
Examinations annually, at the close of the session. 

Students who complete the course of study pre- 
scribed for the first and second years, and whose de- 
portment, while members of the school, has been satis- 
factory, will receive certificates of recommendation as 
teachers for Public Scho Is. Those who complete the 
prescribed course satisfactorily will be entitled to Di- 
plomas. 



15 
LIBRARY, APPARATUS. ETC. 

The School has a small, but well selected Library, 
including the Encyclopedia Britannica and the Cabinet 
Encyclopedia, and is supplied with the necessary Maps 
and Globes, Musical, Historical and Writing Charts, 
and, in addition to these, a set of apparatus for the il 
lustration of Physics or Natural Philosophy. 

SOCITIES. 

The Normal Literary Society, which meets Friday 
evening of each week, and the Normal Band of Hope 
(Temperance), which meets monthly, are societies found- 
ed among the students and subject to their control, un- 
der the supervision of the teachers. They are excellent 
means for drill in Parliamentary usage and business 
habits. 

NON -SECTARIAN. 

The School is not conducted in the interest of any 
religious denomination or an^ political party. The 
teachers belong to different churches, and students, 
while expected to attend some church, are allowed to 
make their own choice. All the leading denominations 
are represented by churches in town. 

Come expecting to work faithfully and honestly; 
to make study your first and only aim while here. If 
you cannot come with this spirit, or if you lack the de- 
termination to carry you thorugh in this spirit, you 
make a mistake in entering a Normal School. 

DIC1PLINE. 

In a Normal School there should be no need of ref- 
erence to the matter of discipline. Only those should 
come, or be admitted, whohave well formed, correct 
habits. 

This is, in no sense, a reform school, and young 
men or women who are not disposed to submit willing- 
ly and cheerfully to all the wholesome restraints found 
necessary for the good working and good reputation of 
the School, will be unhesitatingly dismissed. 

We are, in a measure, responsible to the State for 
the character and equipment of each pupil graduated 



16 

from the School. This being the case, we are compell- 
ed to exercise the most ri^id scrutiny in reference to 
both these; and offences that in a mere academic insti 
tution might be passed oyer lightly, here are viewed 
rather as indicating the unfitness of the offender for 
taking charge of and training the children of the State. 
In this way it sometimes happens that pupils are advis- 
ed to withdraw from the School, or are even dismissed, 
when no very serious charges are brought against 
them, """hese have merely convinced us that they are 
not suitable persons to enter the profession of teaching. 

No publicity is given to such cases. Nor is our 
action ever taken with a view of punishing the offend- 
ers. 

Our aim has constantly been to appeal to the nobler 
natures of onr students in order to secure compliance 
with the regulations of the Sch ol. Our rules prohibit 
what is ungentlemanly or unladylike and disorderly, 
and require only what is necessary toprovide for the 
mental, moral and physical welfare of all. 



Our New Site. 



A valuable tract of land, beautiful for situation, in 
the western suburbs of Fayetteville, has been given the 
Normal School by Mr. D wight Ashley. The land over- 
looks the city and is near the mammoth silk mill of 
the Ashley & Bailey Company. 

On portions of the land given, it is proposed to cul- 
tivate various truck farms. 

THE BUILDINGS. 

Buildings for an Industrial Orphanage, Primary and 
Intermediate Schools have already been erected near 
the site for the main building of the Normal. Plans 
and specifications for the main building, have been ac- 
cepted by the Board, and work, preparatory to the erec- 
tion of the main building, is now in progress. 




GENERAL REMARKS. 

The School has enjoyed, during the twenty-sixth 
annual session, the moral support of all classes ot the 
people of the city, community and section, which has 
proven an invaluable stimulus to both the teachers and 
students, in the earnest prosecution of the work under- 
taken While the School has been, throughout the ses- 
sion largely attended, numbers have, by no means, 
been the object sought or the end in view. The one 
aim of the teachers, from beginning to finish, has been 
thoroughness, thoeoughness Carefully conducted re- 
views in English Grammar, Arithmetic, History, etc., 
as well as in the higher studies of the advanc- 
ed classes, have received special prominence, from time 
to time, throughout the session. In carrying out this 
idea of thoroughness we have added interest in study 
and efficiency generally in the work of the institution. 

With the advantages which are offered here for 
training and equipping teachers, it is to be hoped the 
County Examiners and other friends of the Normal 
School may be ready to advise those who are earnestly 
striving to make themselves good teachers to enter some 
of the departments of the School. 

It may also be suggested, in all kindness, that none 
be recommended who are not physically, mentally and 
morally fitted for the profession. The fact that a can- 
didate has failed at an examination is, alone, hardly 
evidence that he should come to the Normal School. 
While it is our aim, by faithful effort, to fit our students 
for the work of teaching, even here we cannot work 
miracles. 

A cordial invitation is extended to the teachers of 
this section of the State to spend as much of their un- 
employed time with us, as they can thus use it pleasantly 
and profitably. They will be made welcome for a day, 
a week, a month, or a year. 

The Normal School is open to inspection at all 
times, and teachers and friends of education are cordi- 
ally invited to visit it at their convenience. 

We hope to profit by their criticism, favorable or 
otherwise. We are advocates of progress, and are ready 
to alter or amend our system whenever it can be done 
to advantage. For further information, apply to 

E E. SMITH, Principal. 



18 
Lecturers and Visitors. 



Among the distinguished visitors to the School and 
whose presence and addresses encouraged and inspired 
the faculty and students from time to time during the 
session, were: 

Prof. M. C. S. Noble, Capt. T. W. Patton, Hon. W. 

P. Wood, Dr Jeter, Capt. J. D. McNeill, Hon. H. 

L. Cook, Dr H. W. Lilly, Q K. Nimocks, Esq., Dr J. 
V. McGougan, Capt. D. H Ray, Dr. R. H. Simmons, 
Hon. C. B. McMillan, Rev. T. W. Thurston, Rev. I. F. 
Aldridge, Ex-United States Minister O. L. W. Smith, 
Mrs A. L. Hubbard. 



Calendar for 1902-1903. 



School year, 9 months. 

Session opens Monday, August 31st, 1903. 



Holidays. 



Thanksgiving 
Christmas vacation. 
Washington's Birthday. 
Good Friday. 



Errata. 



MacKey, Isabella, Dunn, N. C. 

McDougald, M. L., Manchester, " 

Melvin, M. L., Fayetteville, 



NORTH CAROLINA 
STATE * COLORED 
NORMAL SCHOOL. 



■m 


! 


• 




FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 


i 


1903-1904. 






t 



ii4k 



lxv*-A~ 



W/Mt*J*M&, 



tf. 




ou 



JbuuUo 



Anderson, Mary A., 
Armstrong, M. A., 
Armstrong Minnie, 
Autry, Lula, 
Baldwin, H. E., 
Barham, James W., 
Barham. Naomi, 
Barnes, B. W., 
Barney, Caroline, 
Bayne, Florrie, 
Bayne, M. Lee, 
Beatty, L.. 
Billings, M., 
Black, J. W., 
Black, W A , 
Blackman, Mary C, 
Bonds, J. P., 
Bowen, A. L., 
Boykin, Lillie C, 
Boykin, Sallie D., 
Broadfoot, Florrie H. 
Brown, B. M., 
Brown, Carrie, 
Brown, J. 8., 
Brown, Lee Anna, 
Brown, Lena May, 
Bryant, Mary EL, 
Bunn, M. E , 
Bunn, Sarah, 
Butler, F. L., 
Byrd, Louisa, 
Cameron, Eliza, 
Cameron, Winnie H., 
Carver, G. W., 
Clark, Caroline N., 
Coley, R. F., 
Covington, E. D., 



STUDENTS. 



Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Wade, 

Cornelia, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayettevide, 

Penelo, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Red Springs, 

Red Springs, 

Fayetteville, 

Edonia, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Lumber Bridge. 

Wilmington, 

Laurinburg, 

Cedar. 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Alderman, 

Alderman, 

Fayetteville, 

Wade, 

Swann's Station, 

Swann's Station, 

Sherwood, 

Paolia, 

Pikeville, 

Red Springs, 



JM. C. 



Covington, Susie, 
Council, Amecia, 
Council, Way man, 
Council, William, 
Cromartie, David Register, 
Cromartie, Lettie J., 
Cromartie, W. H., 
Currie, Fannie, 
Currie, .Nora, 
Davis, Rosa A., 
Dra';e, Delila, 
Drake, J F., 
Dunn, Annie E., 
Dunn, C. W., 
Dunn, E. P., 
Dunn, R. N., 
Evans, Estella, 
Evans, W. A., 
Fairley, Robbie A., 
Fisher, G. H., 
Floyd, ISalhe, 
Freeman, Alice L., 
Gainey, Elizabeth, 
Geddie, M. A., 
Gill, J. C, 
Gore, D. C, 
Goodman, Flora K., 
Guion, Callie, 
Hall, Charlotte, 
Halliday, Theresa, 
Harrington, Anna B., 
Harrington, A. H., 
Hawkins, Callie W\, 
Haywood, Martha J., 
Henderson, A. J., 
Jeffers, T., 
Jiggetts, Carrie B., 
Johnson, Lacy, 
Johnson, Lena A., 
Johnson, Rebecca, 
Kirk, Harriet, 
Levy, Meta, 
Lewis, Needbam, 
Mainor, I. J., 
McAlister, Annette, 



Fayetteville, 

Populi, 

Populi, 

Populi, 

Populi, 

Willis' Creek, 

Glenwood, 

Rex, 

Rex, 

W T hite Oak, 

Alderman, 

Alderman. 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, R. F. D. I 

Sherwood, 

Hope Mills, 

Lena, 

Lumberton, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Cornelia, 

Fayetteville, 

Supply, 

Dundarrach, 

White Oak, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Swann's Station. 

Rockingham, 

Dial, 

Mt. Gilead. 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Red Springs, 

Red Springs, 

Alderman, 

Alderman, 

Alderman, 

Fayetteville, 

Goldsboro, 

Cedar Creek, 

Fayetteville. 



N. C. 



McAlisW, Caroline, 
McAlister, George, 
MoAlister, H. A. 
McAlister, William J. 
McDaniel, Alice V., 
McDonald, Minnie, 
MoDongald, M. L., 
Mclntyre, Lula, 
Mclntyre, Lillie, 
McKay, Carrie L., 
McKay, I. D, 
McKay, Josephine, 
McKay, Mary E., 
McKay, Pinkey C, 
McKee, N. L, 
McLauchlin, W. H., 
McLean, Esbert, 
McKethan, Geneva, 
McMillan, G. W., 
McMillan, H. T., 
McNair, J. R., 
McNair, Maggie. 
McNeill, Dicy S., 
McNeill, M. E. B., 
MoPhail, Ada G., 
McPhail, Rachel 
Melvin, A. C, 
Melvin, Dora, 
Melvin, Nellie, 
Miller, Cicero, 
Miller, Emma W., 
Miller, J. S , 
Miller, Maggie, 
Mitchell. T. J., 
Mitchell; J. W., 
Monroe, Caroline, 
Monroe, Nina, 
Moore, John, 
Mnrchison, A. E., 
Murchison, Evander, 
Newell, Aurelia C, 
Owens, Rena, A., 
Owens, W. B., 
Parker, Olivia, 
Perry, J. S., 



Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Alderman, 

Manchester, 

Snannon, 

Shannon, 

Lillington, 

Fayetteville. 

Dial, 

Dial, 

Dial, 

Mc Arthur, 

Brunt, 

Evergreen, 

Cornelia, 

Fayetteville, 

Red Springs, 

Alderman, 

Alderman, 

Legal, 

Cocton, 

Wade, 

Wade, 

Cedar Creek. 

Alderman. 

Alderman, 

Fayetteville, 

Clinton, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Favetteville, 

Dial, 

Dial, 

Carthage, 

Fayetteville, 

Lillington, 

Clarkton, 

Floyd, 

Floyd, 

Fayetteville, R. F. D. 3, 

Fayetteville, 



N. C. 






6 



Pearce, Lena, 
Poe, Addie, 
Poe, A. J., 
Poston, H. J., 
Price, P. B., 
Ray, E. L., 
Kay, F. A., 
Ray, Mary C, 
Reeves, Rosetta, 
Rives, Mary A., 
Robinson, 8. J., 
Sampson, Sadie E., 
Scarborough, Minnie J. 
Sellers, Minnie, 
Settles, L., 
Shaw, Jennie V., 
Simmons, Alberta, 
Simmons, Rowena E., 
Simpson, J. L., 
Smith, A. H., 
Smith, Electa, 
Smith, George W., 
Smith, Irene D., 
Smith, Lena, 
Smith, Lula, 
Smith, Mary E., 
Smith, Purdie, 
Streets, Lacy, 
Surles, M. K., 
Taylor, Cherrie C, 
Thaggard, Myrtle L., 
Thaggard, Samuel W., 
Thigpen, Edward, 
Thomas, Janie, 
Thurston, Virginia T , 
Townsend, Evelina, 
Townsend, O. T., 
Underwood, H. A., 
Whitted, Sarah J., 
Wilder, C. A., 
Williams, Alice, 
Williams, Edward, 
Williams, E. S., 
Williams, Estella, 
Williams, Ethel, 



Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Rockingham, 

Penola, 

Dial, 

Dial, 

Dial, 

Fayetteville, R. F. D. 1 

Millwood, 

Cedar, 

Wilmington, 

Cumberland Mills, 

Populi, 

Populi, 

Elizabethtown, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Populi, 

Idaho, 

Sanford, 

Idaho, 

Idaho, 

Dunn, 

Rex, 

Sherwood, 

Idaho, 

Goldston, 

Sherwood, 

Bland, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Jonesboro, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Rockingham, 

Clinton, 

Elizabethtown, 

Lilesville, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Elease, 

Hope Mills. 

Fayetteville. 



N.C. 



Williams, George H., 


Fayetteville, 


N-. 


Williams, G. M., 


Hope Mills, 




Williams, G. W., 


Fayetteville, 




Williams, Hettie G., 


Fayetteville, 




Williams, Lillie H., 


Fayetteville, 




Williams, Lizzie A., 


Pittsboro, 




Williams, Mattie, 


Pittsboro, 




Williams, Minnie P., 


Fayetteville, 




Williams, Roxanna, 


Fayetteville, 




Winn, Etta D., 


Mount Olive, 




Womble, W. H., 


Fayetteville, 




Woods, John, 


Fayetteville, 




Woods, Lena A., 


Fayetteville, 





SUMMARY. 



No. of males enrolled in the Normal Department 81 

No. of females enrolled in the Normal Department-- 104 

Total enrollment in the Normal Department — 185 

No. of males enrolled in Primary Department 31 

No. of females enrolled in Primary Department 53 

Total enrollment in Primary Department 84 

No. of males enrolled in Night School Department — 56 

No. of females enrolled in Night School Department 32 

Total enrollment in Night School Department- 88 

Grand total enrollment in all departments 357 

Duration of session in weeks 36 

No. of students holding teacher's certificates 61 

No. having taught in Public Schools 52 

No. looking forward to teach 113 

No. of counties represented in the Normal 19 

No. of postoffices represented in the Normal 53 

Average age of students in the Normal 18 

No. completing course of study this year 11 




Graduating Class. 



Cslasstfica tlon . 



3-inst year. 



Annie E. Dunn, 
Edward Williams, 
E. Thigpen, 
Cornelia McAlister, 
I. J. Mainor, 
I D. McKay, 
V. T. Thurston, 
Mattie Billings, 
H. E. Baldwin, 
Lettie Lettles, 
Alice H. Williams, 
S. J. Whitted, 
Naomi Barham, 
N. L. McKee, 
John S. Miller, 
Minnie Sellers, 
Cicero Miller, 
Josephine McKay, 
Wavman Council, 
Myrtle Thaggard, 
W. H. Cromartie, 
Anna 8. Harrington, 
Lillie Mclntyre, 
George McAlister, 
Callie W. Hawkins, 
Evelina Townsend, 
Fannie Currie, 
Meta Levy, 
Lacy Streets, 



Annetta McAlister. 
J. P. Bonds, 
Lena M, Brown, 
E. S. Williams, 



Second year. 



W. J. McAb'ster, 
Maggie Miller, 
Gh W. Williams, 
Mary H. Bryant, 
Minnie Armstrong, 
Carrie Brown, 
F. L. Butler, 
M. A. Armstrong, 
A. C. Melvin, 
Lucy Beatty, 
Esbert McLean, 
Annie Murchison, 
Roxanna Williams, 
John Wood, 
Mary C. Ray, 
Needham Lewis, 
Caroline Monroe, 
Willie Council, 
Lucy Johnson, 
Janie Thomas, 
Amecia Cuuncil, 
H. A. Underwood, 
David Cromartie, 
Nina Monroe, 
Nora Currie, 
John Moore, 
Mary C. Blackman, 
Rebecca Johnson. 



G. H. W T illiams, 
Sarah Bunn, 
E. L. Ray, 
Lillie C. Boykin. 



10 



Learma Brown, 
0. W. Duiin, 
Lena Pearce, 
F. A. Ray, 
Temesia Jeffers, 
Evander Murchison, 
W. A. Evans, 
Caroline N. Clark, 
H. A. McAlister, 
Dora Melvin, 
W. A. Black, 
Emma W. Miller, 
J. R. McNair, 
Winnie H. Cameron, 
J. W. Black, 
Lettie J. Cromartie, 
Dicy S. McNeill, 
Rena A. Owens, 
Estella Evans, 
Mary A Anderson, 
M. K. Surles, 
Geneva McKethan, 
Delila Drake, 
Elizabeth Gainey, 
Susie Covington, 
Electa Smith, 
Sallie Floyd, 
R. N. Dunn, 
Olivia Parker, 
Eliza Cameron, 



E. P. Dunn, 
Marsanna Geddie, 
J. W. Barham, 
Ada G. McPhail, 
Flora K Goodman, 
Caroline Barney, 
A. J. Poe, 
Louisa Byrd, 
O. T. Townsend, 
Aurelia C. Newell, 
H. J. Poston, 
Minnie J. Scarboro'h, 
G. W. Carver, 
Lula A. Smith, 
Mary A. Rives, 
Carrie B. Jiggetts, 
W. B. Owens, 
Addie Poe, 
Hettie G. Williams, 
R. F. Coley, 
Lula Autry, 
Lizzie A. Williams, 
Lula Mclntyre, 
Ethel Williams, 
Carrie L. McKay, 
Lena Smith, 
G. H. Fisher, 
Nellie Melvin, 
A. H. Harrington. 



Cfhird Year. 



Rowena Simmons, 
May E. Smith, 

A. H. Harrington, 
Maggie McNair, 
Mary E. McKay, 
Estella Williams, 
Florrie H. Broad foot, 
Thpresa Halliday, 

G. W. Smith, 
W. G Womble, 
Florrie H. Bayne, 
E. D. Covington, 

B. M. Brown, 



Cherrie C. Taylor, 
Mattie H. Williams, 
Mary E. B. McNeill, 
Annie L. Wood, 
Rosetta Reeves, 
Charlotte Hall, 
Alice L. Freeman, 
Pinky McKay, 
H. T. McMillan, 
Purdie Smith, 
W. H. McLauchlin, 
S. W. Thaggard, 
C. A. Wilder. 



11 



Etta D. Winn, 
P. B. Price, 
Rosa A. Davis, 
Mamie E. Bunn, 
Lena A. Johnson,. 
Rachel McPhail, 
J. L. Simpson, 
Martha J. Haywood, 
Callie Guion. 



J. F. Drake, 
A. J. Henderson, 
J. C. Gill, 
Alice V. McDaniel 
T. J. Mitchell, 
Harriet Kirk, 
J. W. Mitchell, 
Alberta Simmons, 



3-oupth Yea, 



J. S. Perry, 




A. L. Bowen, 
Sadie Sampson. %^ 

B. W. Barnes, 
Minnie P. Williams, 
Lilla J. Rohinson, 
Minnie McDonald, 
Irene D. Smith, 

G. W. McMillan, 



J. S. Brown, 
Sallie D. Boykin, 
Robbie A. Fairley, 
D. 0. Gore, 
A. H. Smith, 
Lillie H. Williams. 
Jennie V. Shaw, 
George M. Williams, 
lie L. Bayne. - 



a 



ipricuium* 



&ifisf 


jvear 


--gait 


,Jenrrii 




Arithmetic, 






5 recitations 


per wee 


English Grammar, 






3 


a " 


Composition, 






2 




Reading, 




* 


5 


" " 


United States History.- 






B 


" " 


Geography, 






2 " 


" " 


Civil Government, 






3 




Spelling, 






5 




Writing, 






2 


" " 


Drawing, 






2 


" " 


Vocal Music, 






5 


it (C 


Spring Term, same course 


as 






Fall Term. 











Second Jreeti -"-xfa/l *Jerm< 



Arithmetic, 
English Grammar, 
Composition, 
Reading, 

United States History, 
Geography, 
Civil Government, 
Spelling, 
Drawing, 
Writing, 
Vocal Music, 
Spring Term the same 



5 recitations per week 
3 



13 



<Jhirel J/ear — •</«// i/enm* 



Algebra, 


3 recitations per 


Arithmetic, 


2 


Composition, 


3 


English Grammar, 


2 


Reading and English Literature, 


5 


"North Carolina History, 


3 


Methods of Teaching, 


2 


Historv of Education, 


3 


Physiology, 


2 


Civil Government, 


2 


Spelling, 


5 


Vocal Music, 


5 " " 


Spring i/erm. 


Algebra, 


3 recitations per 


Arithmetic, 


2 


English Grammar, 


2 


Composition, 


3 


Reading and English Literal ure, 


5 


North Carolina History, 


3 


Methods of Teaching, 


2 


History of Education, 


3 


Physical Geography, 


2 


Civil Government, 


2 


Spelling, 


5 


Vocal Music, 


5 



week. 



General History, 
Algebra Continued, 
English Literature, 
Methods of Teaching, 
History of Education 
Physical Geography, 

Frequent Reviews of the Common School Branches. 

Sewing and cooking are taught to females, and farming 
and carpentry to males. 

Course of study for the Spring Term same as that for 
iPallTerm. 



14 

The above course of study, comprising four years, 
having been adopted for the school by the State Board of 
Examiners, has been strictly followed, 



Otate Qolored ^Afor/nal School, 
Jai/etteuiUe, J/. 6. 



ZHistory. 

This Institution was established by the State Board of 
Education under an Act of the General Assembly of 1876-'77, 
for the training of teachers for the Negro schools of the State. 
It has completed twenty-seven sessions of nine months each, 
in which 1,452 different students, from seventy-two different 
counties in the State, have been enrolled. 

One hundred and sixty-five have completed the pre- 
scribed course and have received diplomas of graduation. Of 
this number only a few have failed to devote themselves to 
educational work. A number of the undergraduates also en- 
gage in teaching. The character of the work accomplished 
in the school is exerting an influence for good throughout 
the State. 

Qualifications for Admission. 

Every applicant for admission must present evidence of 
good moral character, read intelligently in the Fifth Reader; 
write a legible hand; spell ordinary English words; have a 
fair knowledge of the Primary History of the United States; 
pass an examination in Arithmetic, through common and 
decimal fractions; possess a knowledge of Elementary Geog- 
raphy. 

Students must promise, upon becoming members of the 
School, to observe the Rules and Regulations, to provide 
themselves with books necessary tor their instruction. 

^Boarding. 

Board from $5.00 to $7.00 per month. 

General Crteg illations. 

Particular attention is called to the following points: 
1. Students who do not board at home or at the school, 



16 

are expected to consult the President before selecting board- 
ing places. 

2. Ladies and gentlemen will not be permitted to board 
in the same family. This rule shall apply equally where the 
house is occupied by two or more families. 

3. Permission must be obtained in every case where 
pupils desire to board in families where boardera are taken 
who are not connected with the school. 

4. Brothers and sisters ivil 1 be allowed to board in the 
same family, provided no other boarders are received into the 
house. 

5. Students will be expected to not change their board- 
ing places without consulting the Principal. 

6. When students engage a boarding house it will be 
understood that they are to remain in that place until the 
end of the current term, unless a specific bargain to the con- 
trary is made. 

7. Every means will be taken to secure suitable board- 
ing places for such students as desire this service, and fami- 
lies in which students board will be encouraged to report the 
least departure from perfect ladylike and gentlemanly con- 
duct. 

8. Pupils may receive calls on Friday and Saturday 
evenings from 6 o'clock tc 9 o'clock, and on other days out 
of shidy hours. 

Tuition is free to all residents cf the State. 

Stature unci sOesign. 

A Normal School is neither a college, a law school, nor 
a theological school, but a school for the thorough in- 
struction AND SYSTEMATIC TRAINING OF STUDENTS WHO WISH 
to become teachers; hence, the design of this schoool is — 

I. Thorough instruction in all branches required to be 
taught in Public Schools of the State. 

II. The best me' hods of teaching these branches and 
governing the schools; and, 

III. The cultivation of the habit of thinking clearly 
and systematically, and the practice of delivering the thoughts 
and explanations in a lucid and pleasant manner. To accom- 
plish this our course of study, practice in teaching, library 
and rhetorical exercises are admirably adapted. 

Qualifications ot a floou 1 t/euclier. 

1st. Good health, good common sense and sound judg- 
ment. 




Cooking Class — Taught by Miss Emma J. Council. 



CATALOGUE 



OF THE 



TWENTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL SESSION 



NORTH CAROLINA 

STATE COLORED * dt 
a S NORMAL SCHOOL 

FAYETTEVILLE, N. G 

FOR THE YEAR 1903-190*. 



Fayetteville, N. C. 

N. C. Baptist Pub. Co. 

1904. 



STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION, 



GOVERNOR 0. B. AYCOCK President. 

HON. W. D. TURNER Lieutenant-Governor. 

HON. J. BRYAN GRIMES Secretary of State. 

HON. B. R. LACY Treasurer. 

HON. B. F. DIXO:N Auditor. 

HON. R. D. GILMER Attorney-General. 

HON. J. Y. JOYNER, Supt. Pub. Instruction, Secretary. 

LOCAL BOARD OF MANAGERS, 

HON. H. L.COOK Chairman. 

MR. Q. K. NIMOCKS Secretary. 

DR. H. W. LILLY Treasurer. 

PROF. L. C. BROGDEN, 
MR. R. F. DeVANE. 



FACULTY, 

E. E. SMITH, M. A., Ph. D., Principal, 

Pedagogy, Civil Government. 

J. A. CROOM, B. A., Assistant Principal, 

Mathematics, English Literature. 

J. F. K. SIMPSON, A. M., 

English, Physiology. 

MISS E. J. COUNCIL, 

Orthography, Reading. 

MRS. L. S. PERRY, 

History, Geography. 

MISS I. G. JACOBS, 

Primary Department. 

MISS M. E. PERRY, 

Instrumental Music. 

MR. J. S. BROWN, 

Principal Night School. 



Cooking. 
Sewing. 

Agriculture. 

Students from the advanced classes were appointed by the 
Principal from time to time to conduct recitations. 



STUDENTS. 



Anderson, Mary A., 
Armstrong, M. A., 
Armstrong Minnie, 
Autry, Lula, 
Baldwin, H. E., 
Barham, James W., 
'Barham. Naomi, 
Barnes, B. W., 
Barney, Caroline, 
Bayne, Florrie, 
B <yne, M. Lee, 
Beatty, L.. 
Billings, M., 
Black, J. W.. 
Black, W A , 
Blackman, Mary C, 
Bonds, J. P., 
Bo wen, A. L., 
Boykin, Lillie C, 
Boykin, Sallie D., 
Broadfoot, Florrie H., 
Brown, B. M., 
Brown, Carrie, 
Brown, J. S., 
Brown, Lee Anna, 
Brown, Lena May, 
Bryant, Mary H., 
Bunn, M. E , 
Bunn, Sarah, 
Butler, F. L., 
Byrd, Louisa, 
Cameron, Eliza, 
Cameron, Winnie H., 
Carver, Gr. W., 
Clark, Caroline N., 
Coiey, R. F, 
Covington, E. D., 



Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Wade, 

Cornelia, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Penelo, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Red Springs, 

Red Springs, 

Fayetteville, 

Edonia, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Lumber Bridge. 

Wilmington, 

Laurinburg, 

Cedar, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Alderman, 

Alderman, 

Fayetteville, 

Wade, 

Swann's Station, 

Swann's Station, 

Sherwood, 

Paolia, 

Pikeville, 

Red Springs, 



N. C. 



Covington, Susie, 
Council, Amecia, 
Council, Way man, 
Council, William, 
Cromartie, David Eegister, 
Cromartie, Lettie J., 
Cromartie, W. H., 
Currie, Fannie, , 
Currie, iSiora, 
Davis, Rosa A., 
Dra l <e, Delila, 
Drake, J F, 
Dunn, Annie E., 
Dunn. C. W., 
Dunn, E. P., 
Dunn, R. K, 
Evans, Estella, 
Evans, W. A., 
Fairley, Robbie A., 
Fisher, G. H., 
Floyd, Salhe, 
Freeman, Alice L., 
Gainey, Elizabeth, 
Geddie, M. A., 
Gill, J. C, 
Gore, D. C, 
Goodman, Flora K., 
Guion, Callie, 
Hall, Charlotte, 
Halliday, Theresa, 
Harrington, Anna B., 
Harrington, A. H., 
Hawkins, Callie W., 
Haywood, Martha J., 
Henderson, A. J., 
Jeffers, T., 
Jiggetts, Carrie B., 
Johnson, Lacy, 
Johnson, Lena A., 
Johnson, Rebecca, 
Kirk, Harriet, 
Levy, Meta, 
Lewis, Needham, 
Mainor, I. J., 
McAlister, Annette, 



Fayetteville, 

Populi, 

Populi, 

Populi, 

Populi, 

Willis' Creek, 

Glen wood, 

Rex, 

Rex, 

White Oak, 

Alderman, 

Alderman. 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, R. F. D. 1 

Sherwood, 

Hope Mills, 

Lena, 

Lumberton, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Cornelia, 

Fayetteville, 

Supply, 

Dundarrach, 

White Oak, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Swann's Station. 

Rockingham. 

Dial, 

Mt. Gilead, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Red Springs, 

Red Springs, 

Alderman, 

Alderman, 

Alderman, 

Fayetteville, 

Goldsboro, 

Cedar Creek, 

Fayetteville. 



N. C. 



McAlister, Caroline, 
McAlister, Grebrge, 
McAlister, H. A. 
McAlister, William J. 
McDaniel, Alice V., 
McDonald, Minnie, 
MoDougald, M. L., 
Mclntyre, Lula, 
Mclntyre, Lillie, 
McKay, Carrie L., 
McKay, I.D., 
McKay, Josephine, 
Mr Kay, Mary E., 
McKay, Pinkey C, 
McKee, N. L., 
McLaucblin, W. EL, 
McLean, Esbert, 
McKethan, Geneva, 
McMillan, Gt. W, 
McMillan, H. T., 
McNair, J. R., 
McNair, Maggie. 
McNeill, Dicy S, 
McNeill, M. E. B., 
MoPtiail, Ada Gt., 
McPhail, Rachel 
Melvin, A. C, 
Meivin, Dora, 
Melvin, Nellie, 
Miller, Cicero, 
Miller, Emma W., 
Miller, J. S , 
Miller, Maggie, 
Mitchell, T. J., 
Mitchell, J. W, 
Monroe, Caroline, 
Monroe. Nina, 
Moore, John, 
Murchison, A. E., 
Murchison, Evander, 
Newell, Aurelia C, 
Owens, Rena, A., 
Owens, W. B., 
Parker, Olivia, 
Perry, J. S., 



Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Alderman, 

Manchester, 

Stiannon, 

SijannoD, 

Lillington, 

Fayetteville, 

Dial, 

Dial, 

Dial, 

Mc Arthur, 

Brunt, 

Evergreen, 

Cornel'a, 

Fayetteville, 

Red Springs, 

Alder man, 

Aldermau, 

LegaJ, 

C'uton, 

Wade, 

Wade, 

Cedar Creek. 

Alderman. 

Alderman, 

Fayetteville, 

Clinton, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Favetteville, 

Dial, 

Dial, 

Carthage, 

Fayetteville, 

Lillington, 

Clarkton, 

Floyd, 

Floyd, 

Fayetteville, R. F. D. 3, 

Fayetteville, 



N. 



6 



Pearce, Lena, 
Poe, Addie, 
Poe, A. J., 
Poston, H. J., 
Price, P. B., 
Ray, E. L., 
Ray, F. A., 
Ray, Mary C, 
Reeves, Rosetta, 
Rives, Mary A., 
Robinson, S. J., 
Sampson, Sadie E., 
Scarborough, Minnie J., 
Sellers, Minnie, 
Settles, L., 
Shaw, Jennie V., 
Simmons, Alberta, 
Simmons, Rowena E., 
Simpson, J. L., 
Smith, A. H., 
Smith, Electa, 
Smith, George W., 
Smith, Irene D., 
Smith, Lena, 
Smith, Lula, 
Smith, Mary E., 
Smith, Purdie, 
Streets, Lacy, 
Surles, M. K., 
Taylor, Cherrie C, 
Thaggard, Myrtle L., 
Thaggard, Samuel W., 
Thigpen, Edward, 
Thomas, Janie, 
Thurston, Virginia T , 
Townsend, Evelina, 
Towusend, O. T., 
Underwood, H. A., 
Whitted, Sarah J., 
Wilder, C. A., 
Williams, Alice, 
Williams, Edward, 
Williams, E. S., 
Williams, Estella, 
Williams, Ethel, 



Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Rockingham, 

Penola, 

Dial, 

Dial, 

Dial, 

Fayetteville, R. F. D. 

Millwood, 

Cedar, 

Wilmington, 

Cumberland Mills, 

Populi, 

Populi, 

Elizabethtown, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Populi, 

Idaho, 

Sanford, 

Idaho, 

Idaho, 

Dunn, 

Rex, 

Sherwood, 

Idaho, 

Goldston, 

Sherwood, 

Bland, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Jonesboro, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Rockingham, 

Clinton, 

Elizabethtown, 

Lilesville, 

Fayetteville, 

Fayetteville, 

Elease, 

Hope Mills. 

Fayetteville, 



N. 0. 



Williams, George H., 


Fayetteville, 


N. 


Williams, G-. M., 


Hope Mills, 




Williams, G. W., 


Fayetteville, 




Williams, Hettie G., 


Fayetteville, 




Williams, Lillie H., 


Fayetteville, 




Williams, Lizzie A., 


Pittsboro, 




Williams, Mattie, 


Pittsboro, 




Williams, Minnie P., 


Fayetteville, 




Williams, Roxanna, 


Fayetteville, 




Winn. Etta D.. 


Mount Olive, 




Womble, W, H., 


Fayetteville, 




Woods, John, 


Fayetteville, 




Woods, Lena A., 


Fayetteville, 





SUMMARY. 



No. of males enrolled in the Normal Department 81 

No. of females enrolled in the Normal Department-- 104 

Total enrollment in the Normal Department — 185 

No. of males enrolled in Primary Department 31 

No. of females enrolled in Primary Department 53 

Total enrollment in Primary Department 84 

No. of males enrolled in Night School Department— 56 

No. of females enrolled in Night School Department 32 

Total enrollment in Night School Department- 88 

Grand total enrollment in all departments 357 

Duration of session in weeks 36 

No. of students holding teacher's certificates 61 

No. having taught in Public Schools 52 

No. looking forward to teach 113 

No. of counties represented in the Normal 19 

No. of postoffices represented in the Normal 53 

Average age of students in the Normal 18 

No. completing course of study this year 11 





■JUL , 




^~~- — ;■■ <]•■ '■ "■ 


jt | .jB' 






^" jc^j-sW^jB^. 




i% "■'■ A 


lM^>\ 


* 





Graduating Class. 



(classification. 



Zirst y e 



Annie E. Dunn, 
Edward Williams, 
E. Thigpen, 
Cornelia McAlister, 
I. J. Mainor, 
I D. McKay, 
V. T. Thurston, 
Mattie Billings, 
H. E. Baldwin, 
Lettie Lettles, 
Alice H. Williams, 
S. J. Whitted, 
Naomi Barharo, 
N. L. McKee, 
John S. Miller, 
Minnie Sellers, 
Oicero Miller, 
Josephine McKay, 
Wa\ man Council, 
Myrtle Thaggard, 
W. H. Crumartie, 
Anna 8. Harrington. 
Lillie Mclntyre, 
George McAlister, 
Callie W. Hawkins, 
Evelina Townsend, 
Fannie Currie, 
Meta Levy, 
Lacy Streets, 



Annetta McAlister. 
J. P. Bonds, 
Lena M. Brown, 
E. S. Williams, 



Second Jean. 



W. J. McAlister, 
Maggie Miller, 
G. W. Williams, 
Mary H, Bryant, 
Minnie Armstrong, 
Carrie Brown, 
F. L. Butler, 
M. A. Armstrong, 
A. C. Melvin, 
Lucy Beatty, 
Esbert McLean, 
Annie Murchison, 
Roxanna Williams, 
John Wood, 
Mary C. Ray, 
Needham Lewis, 
Caroline Monroe, 
Willie Council, 
Lucy Johnson, 
Janie Thomas, 
Amecia Cuuncil, 
H. A. Underwood, 
David Cromartie, 
Nina Monroe, 
Nora Currie, 
John Moore, 
Mary C. Blackman, 
Eebecca Johnson. 



G. H. W T illiams, 
Sarah Bunn, 
E. L. Ray, 
Lillie C. Boykin. 



10 



Leanna Brown, 
0. W. Dunn, 
Lena Pearce, 
F. A. Ray, 
Tetnesia Jeffers, 
Evander Murchison, 
W. A. Evans, 
Caroline N. Clark, 
H. A. McAlister, 
Dora Melvin, 
W. A. Black, 
Emma W. Miller, 
J. R. McNair, 
Winnie H. Cameron, 
J. W. Black, 
Lettie J. Croraartie, 
Dicy S. McNeill, 
Rena A. Owens, 
Estella Evans, 
Mary A. Anderson, 
M. K. Surles, 
Geneva McKethan, 
Delila Drake, 
Elizabeth Gainey, 
Susie Covington, 
Electa Smith, 
Sallie Flovd, 
R. N. Dunn, 
Olivia Parker, 
Eliza Cameron, 



E. P. Dunn, 
Marsanna Geddie, 
J. W. Barham, 
AdaG.McPhail, 
Flora K Goodman, 
Caroline Barney, 
A. J. Poe, 
Louisa Byrd, 
O. T. Townsend, 
Aurelia C. Newell, 
H. J. Poston, 
Minnie J. Scarboro'h, 
G. W. Carver, 
Lula A. Smith, 
Mary A. Rives, 
Carrie B. Jiggetts, 
W. B. Owens, 
Addie Poe, 
Hettie G. Williams, 
R. F. Coley, 
Lula Autry, 
Lizzie A. Williams, 
Lula Mclntyre, 
Ethel Williams, 
Carrie L. McKay, 
Lena Smith, 
G. H. Fisher, 
Nellie Melvin, 
A. H. Harrington. 



i/Aird jean. 



Rowena Simmons, 
May E. Smith, 

A. H. Harrington, 
Maggie McNair, 
Mary E. McKay, 
Estella Williams, 
FlorrieH.Broadfoot, 
Theresa Halliday, 
G. W. Smith, 

W. G. Womble, 
Florrie H. Bayne, 
E. D. Covington, 

B. M. Brown, 



V 



Cherrie C. Taylor, 
Mattie H. Williams, 
Mary E. B. McNeill, 
Annie L. Wood, 
Rosetta Reeves, 
Charlotte Hall, 
Alice L. Freeman, 
Pinky McKay, 
H. T. McMillan, 
Purdie Smith, 
W. H. McLauchlin, 
S. W. Thaggard, 
C. A. Wilder. 



11 



Etta D. Winn, 
P. B. Price, 
Rosa A. Davis, 
Mamie E. Bunn, 
Lena A. Johnson, 
Rachel McPhail, 
J. L. Simpson, 
Martha J. Haywood, 
Callie Gnion, 



J. F. Drake, 
A. J. Henderson, 
J. 0. Gill, 
Alice V. McDaniel, 
T. J. Mitchell, 
Harriet Kirk, 
J. W. Mitchell, 
Alberta Simmons, 
J. S. Perry, 



fourth year. 



A. L. Bowen, 
Sadie Sampson, 

B. W. Barnes, 
Minnie P. Williams, 
Lilla J. Robinson, 
Minnie McDonald, 
Irene D. Smith, 

G. W. McMillan, 



J. S. Brown, 
Sallie Dr Boykin, 
Robbie A. Fairley, 
D, 0. Gore, 
A. H. Smith, 
Lillie H. Williams, 
Jennie V. Shaw, 
George M. Williams, 
Maggie L. Bayne. 



C irrlcu lum * 



ift/*sf \ ear-*-rfa(l t/erm. 



Arithmetic, 


5 


recitations 


per wee 


English Grammar, 


3 


" 




Composition, 


2 


t< 




Reading, 


5 






United States History,. 


8 


"• 




Geography, 


2 


a 




Civil Government, 


3 






Spelling, 


5 






Writing, 


2 


"' 


" " 


Drawing, 


2 




" " 


Vocal Music, 


?> 


** 


,t (c 


Spring Term, same course as 








Fall Term, 









Second year---3-atl Z/erm< 



Arithmetic, 
English Grammar, 
Composition, 
Reading, 

United States History, 
Geography, 
Civil Government, 
Spelling, 
Drawing, 
Writing, 
Vocal Music, 
Spring Term the same- 



5 recitations per week.. 
3 



13 



{Third Year — 3all C/erm* 



Algebra, 


3 recitations per week 


Arithmetic, 


2 


a 


it a 


Composition, 


3 


" 


" " 


English Grammar, 


2 


" 


'■ " 


Reading and English Literature.- - 




" 


" 


North Carolina History, 


3 


" 


" " 


Methods of Teaching, 


2 


" 


" " 


Historv of Education, 


3 


" 


(( a 


Physiology, 


2 


" 


" " 


Civil Government, 


2 


" 


" " 


Spelling, 


5 


" 


" " 


Vocal Music, 


5 




Spring %/erm. 




Algebra, 


3 recitations per week. 


Arithmetic, 


2 


" 




* 


English Grammar, 


2 


" 


' 


" 


Composition, 


3 


" 


' 


' 


Reading and English Literature, 


5 


.< 




' 


North Carolina History, 


3 


i< 1 


' 


1 


Methods of Teaching, 


2 


" 


8 


* 


History of Education, 


3 


" * 


' 


I 


Physical Geography, 


2 


" ' 


' 


■' 


Civil Government, 


■ 2 


" 


' 


* 


Spelling, 


5 


« < 


' 


' 


Vocal Music, 


5 


" * 


' 


* 



3-oUrth year-*--3-<ill {Term* 

General History, 
Algebra Continued^ 
English Literature, 
Methods of Teaching, 
History of Education 
Physical Geography, 

Frequent Reviews of the Common School Branches. 

Sewing and cooking are taught to females, and farming 
&nd carpentry to males. 

Course of study for the Spring Term same as that for 
Fall Term. 



14 

The above course of study) comprising four years, 
having been adopted for the school by the JState Board of 
Examiners, has been strictly followed. 



Otate Qolored ^lormal Ochool, 
Jayetteullle, >*Y. C 



ZHistory. 

This Institution was established by the State Board of 
Education under an Act of the General Assembly of 1876-'77, 
for the training of teachers for the Negro schools of the State. 
It has completed twenty-seven sessions of nine months each, 
in which 1,452 different students, from seventy-two different 
counties in the State, have been enrolled. 

One hundred and sixty-five have completed the pre- 
scribed course and have received diplomas of graduation. Of 
this number only a few have failed to devote themselves to 
educational work. A number of the undergraduates also en- 
gage in teaching. The character of the work accomplished 
in the school is exerting an influence for good throughout 
the State. 

Qualifications for ^(aimission. 

Every applicant for admission must present evidence of 
good moral character, read intelligently in the Fifth Reader; 
write a legible hand; spell ordinary English words; have a 
fair knowledge of the Primary History of the United States* 
pass an examination in Arithmetic, through common and 
decimal fractions; possess a knowledge of Elementary Geog- 
raphy. 

Students must promise, upon becoming members of the 
School, to observe the Rules and Regulations, to provide 
themselves with books necessary tor their instruction. 

r/joarding. 

Board from $5.00 to $7.00 per month. 

General ^Regulations. 

Particular attention is called to the following points: 
1. Students who do not board at home or at the school, 



16 

are expected to consult the President before selecting board- 
ing places. 

2. Ladies and gentlemen will not be permitted to board 
in the same family. This rule shall apply equally where the 
house is occupied by two or more families. 

3. Permission must be obtained in every case where 
pupils desire to board in families where boarders are taken 
who are not connected with the school. 

4. Brothers and sisters .vill be allowed to board in the 
same family, provided no other boarders are received into the 
house. 

5. Students will be expected to not change their board- 
ing places without consulting the Principal. 

6. When students engage a boarding house it will be 
understood that they are to remain in that place until the 
end of the current term, unless a specific bargain to the con- 
trary is made. 

7. Every means will be taken to secure suitable board- 
ing places for such students as desire this service, and fami- 
lies in which students board will be encouraged to report the 
least departure from perfect ladylike and gentlemanly con- 
duct. 

8. Pupils may receive calls on Friday and Saturday 
evenings from 6 o'clock tc 9 o'clock, and on other days out 
of study hours. 

Tuition is free to all residents cf the State. 

^Nature and ^Design. 

A Normal School is neither a college, a law school, nor 
a theological school, but a school for the thorough in- 
struction AND SYSTEMATIC TRAINING OF STUDENTS WHO WISH 
to become teachers; hence, the design of this schoool is — 

I. Thorough instruction in all branches required to be 
taught i<ri Public Schools of the State. 

II. The best me* hods of teaching these branches and 
governing' the schools; and, 

III. The cultivation of the habit of thinking clearly 
and systematically, and the practice of delivering the thoughts 
and explanations in a lucid and pi easant manner. To accom- 
plish this our course of study, practice in teaching, library 
and rhetorical exercises are admirably adapted. 

Qualifications of a tfooa 1 t/eacner. 

1st. Good health, good common sense and sound judg- 
ment. 




Cooking Class— Taught by Miss Emma J. Council. 



17 

2nd. A thorough knowledge of the branches he pro- 
poses to teach. 

3rd. Aptness to teach. He may be rich in knowledge, 
but it will be of little value to his pupils unless he has the 
skill of communicating it. 

4th. Perfect self-control. He cannot govern others 
when unable to govern himself. 

oth. Love for his calling. Any work is easily done 
when prompted by love. Whatever one does willingly is no 
trouble. 

Examinations. 

Oral and written examinations of all students will be 
held during the first week of each term, and public examina- 
tions annually, at the close of the session. 

Students who complete the course of study prescribed 
for the first and second years, and whose deportment, while 
members of the school has been satisfactory, will receive 
certificates of recommendation as teachers for public schools. 
Those who complete the prescribed course satisfactorily will 
be entitled to diplomas. 

Gib r any, Apparatus, Etc. 

The School has a small, but well selected Library, in- 
cluding the Encyclopedia Britannica and the Cabinet Ency- 
clopedia, and is supplied with the necessary Maps and Globes, 
Musical, Historical and Writing Charts, and, in addition to 
these, a set of apparatus for the illustration of Physics or 
Natural Philosophy. 

Societies. 

The Normal Literary Society, which meets Friday even- 
ing of each week, and the Normal Band of Hope (Temper- 
ance), which meets monthly, are societies formed among the 
students and subject to their control, under the supervision 
of the teachers. They are excellent means for drill in par- 
liamentary usage and business habits. 



^Aton-Sectt 



eciarian. 



The School is not conducted in the interest of any reli- 
gious denomination or any political party. The teachers 
belong to the different churches, and students, while expected 
to attend some church, are allowed to make their own choice, 
All the leading denominations are represented by churches 
in town. 



18 

Come expecting to work faithfully and honestly; to 
make study your first and only aim while here. If you can- 
not come with this spirit, or if you lack the determination 
to carry you through in this spirit, you make a mistake in 
entering a Normal School. 

^Discipline. 

In a Normal School there should be no need of reference 
to the matter of discipline. Only those should come, or be 
admitted, who have well-formed, correct habits. 

This, in no sense, is a reform school, and young men or 
women who are not disposed to submit willingly and cheer- 
fully to all the wholesome restraints found necessary for the 
good working and good reputation of the school, will be un- 
hesitatingly dismissed. 

We are, in a measure, responsible to the State for the 
character and equipment of each pupil graduated from the 
school. This being the case, we are compelled to exercise 
the most rigid scrutiny in reference to both these; and 
offences that in a mere academic institution might be passed 
over lightly, here are viewed rather as indicating the unfit- 
ness of the offender for taking charge of and training the 
children of the State. In this way it sotnetimes happens 
that pupils are advised to withraw from the school, or are 
even dismissed, when no very serious charges are brought 
against them. These have merely convinced us that they 
are not suitable persons to enter the profession of teaching. 

No publicity i3 given to such cases. Nor is our action 
ever taken with a view ot punishing the offenders. 

Our aim has constantly been to appeal to the nobler 
natures of our students in order to secure compliance with 
the regulations of the school. Our rules prohibit what is un- 
gentlemanly or unladylike and disorderly, and require only 
what is necessary to provide for the mental, moral and phys- 
ical welfare of all. 



I &> 



emar/is. 



The school has enjoyed, during the twenty-seventh an- 
nual session, the moral support of all classes of the people of 
the city, community and section, which has proven an inval- 
uable stimulus to both the teachers and students, in the 
earnest prosecution of the work undertaken. While the 
school has been, throughout the session largely attended, 
numbers have, by no means, been the object sought or the 
end in view. The one aim of the teachers, from beginning 



19 

to finsh, has been thoroughness — thoroughness. Carefully 
conducted reviews in English Grammar, Arithmetic, History, 
etc., as well as in the higher studies of the advanced classes, 
have received special prominence, from time to time, through- 
out the session. In carrying out this idea of thoroughness 
we have added interest in study and efficiency generally in 
the work of the institution. 

With the advantages which are offered here for training 
and equipping teachers, it is to be hoped that County Ex- 
aminers and other friends of the Normal School may be ready 
to advise those who are earnestly striving to make themselves 
good teachers to enter some of the departments of the school. 

It may also be suggested, in all kindness, that none be rec- 
ommended who are not physically, mentally and morally fitted 
for the profession. The fact that a candidate has failed at 
an examination is, alone, hardly evidence that he should 
come to the Normal School. While it is our aim, by faith- 
ful effort, to fit our students for the work of teaching, even 
here we cannot work miracles. 

A cordial invitation is extended to the teachers of this 
section of the State to spend as much of their unemployed 
time as possibe with us, as they can thus use it pleasantly 
and profitably. They will be made welcome for a day, a 
week, a month, or a year. 

The Normal School is open to inspection at all times, 
and teachers and friends of education are cordially invited 
to visit it at their convenience. 

We hope to profit by their criticism, favorable or other- 
wise. We are advocates of progress, and are ready to alter 
or amend our«system whenever it can be done to advantage. 
For further information, apply to 

E. E. SMITH, Principal. 



20 

i^ectuners and Visitors. 

Among the distinguished visitors to the school and 
whose presencH and addresses encouarged and inspired the 
fa ulty and students from time to time during the session, 
were: 

Hon. J. Y. Jovner, State Superintendent Publio Instruc- 
tion; Prof. M. 0. 8. Noble, Prof. J. I. Foust and Dr. F. L. 
Stephens, of the State Board of Examiners; Hon. H. L. 
Cook, chairman Board of Managers; Dr. H. W. Lilly and Prof. 
L. C. Brogden, of the Boad of Managers; Rev. I. W. Hughes, 
rector of St. John's church city; Prof. W. T. B. Williams, 
Hampton Institute, Hampton, Va., School Visitor for the 
General Educational Board of New York; Dr. H. C. Scurlock, 
Assistant Chemist, Howard University, Washington, D. C; 
Rev. S. P. Smith, Pastor Haymount Presbyterian church, 
city: Rev. <J. E. C.Barham; Dr. A. M. Black, of Vienna; Dr. 
R. H. Simmons, P. E.; E. E. Smith, Jr., M. D.; Dr. A. W. 
Pegues, Dean Theological Department Shaw University; 
Mr. Dwight Ashley, of the Ashley-Bailey silk mills. 



Catendar for 7903-7904. 



School year, 9 months. 

Session opens Monday, September 5th, 1904. 

ZHolidays. 

Thanksgiving. 
Christmas vacation. 
Washington's Birthday. 
Grood Friday. 




Sewing Class — Taught by Mrs. Lena Scott Perry. 



FIRST ANNUAL CATALOGUE 

OB- THE 

NORTH CAROLINA 

STATE COLORED NORMAL SCHOOLS 

FOR I904-'P5 
ANNOUNCEMENT FOR l905-'06 



WEVSTCHV-SAEEM 

FAYETTEVILIiE 
ELIZABETH CITY 



STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION. 



It. B. Glenn, Governor. 

F. D. Winston, Lieutenant-Governor. 

J. Bryan Grimes. Secretary of State. 

B. R. Lacy, Treasurer. 

K. D. Gilmer. Attorney-General. 

B. F. Dixon, Auditor. 

J, Y. Joyner," Superintendent Public Instruction. 



By authority of laws enacted by the Legislatures of 1903 and 1905. 
the general control and management of the State Colored Normal 
Schools is vested in the above board. 



FIRST ANNUAL CATALOGUE 



NORTH CAROLINA 
,TATE COLORED NORMAL SCHOOLS 

FOE 

1904- , 05 



ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR l905-'06 



WINSTON-SALEM, FAYETTEV1LLE, ELIZABETH CITY 



RALEIGH 

E. M. Uzzell & Co., State Printers and Binders 

1905 



ANNOUNCEMENT. 



The State Board of Education, assisted by citizens of the towns of 
Winston-Salem, Elizabeth City and Fayetteville, has permanently 
established three normal schools for the education of teachers for the 
aegro public schools of the State. These normal schools will be 
located at Winston, Elizabeth City and Fayetteville, in accordance 
?rith an agreement entered into between the board and certain citizens 
)f the three towns just named. 

It is the intention to proceed at once to begin the erection of suit- 
ible buildings for these schools at Fayetteville and Elizabeth City. 
rhe school at Winston-Salem will be conducted at the Slater School, 
svhose property has been turned over to the State and will be used for 
normal-school purposes. 

Since 1877, when the first one of these normal schools was estab- 
lished at Fayetteville, they have had no permanent home, no build- 
ings and equipment which belonged to the State. For that and other 
reasons, the progress of these schools has been unsatisfactory in many 
respects, their development has been hindered, and their influence in 
making the negro common school better has been necessarily limited. 

Beginning with the school year 1905-'06, it is hoped that all friends 
jf public education, and especially the negro citizens of North Caro- 
lina, will heartily second the efforts of the State Board of Education 
to make these normal schools worthy the name and the cause they 
represent. These schools are not colleges. The course of study in- 
cludes only the course of study required to be taught in the elementary 
public schools of the State. Those who enter the normal department 
3f these schools must be able to do fifth-grade work. In the develop- 
ment of these schools a high-school course of four years will finally 
be provided for all who can profitably take such a course. But this 
high-school course will emphasize agriculture, domestic science, Eng- 
tish, history, mathematics and drawing, subjects which so vitally con- 
cern the proper training of negro teachers as well as negro citizens. 

The negro citizens of North Carolina can aid these schools and the 
cause of education by sending their children to them or by contrib- 
uting to the building fund which is being raised for the purpose of 
putting these schools in permanent homes. Amounts however small 
will be accepted. 

It->gives me pleasure to announce that some three thousand dollars 
has already been raised for buildings at Fayetteville, and eight thou- 
sand dollars for the same purpose at Elizabeth City. A considerable 
part of this money has been contributed by negro citizens. By such 
co-operation with the State on the part of these communities, it will 
be readily seen that something permanent can soon be accomplished in 
the way of buildings and equipment for the negro normal schools. 

Charles L. Coon, 
Superintendent Normal Schools. 

Raleigh. N. C, July 1, 1905. 



EXPLANATION. 



The catalogue of pupils printed hereafter contains definite informa- 
tion as to the age and attendance of normal pupils for 1904-'05. This 
record is printed in justification of the necessity of the new regula- 
tion about attendance and tardiness. Let it be understood by ail 
prospective pupils for 1905-'0G that tardiness and inattendance will 
hereafter be dealt with in accordance with the regulations on those 
subjects. 



PURPOSE. 



The Colored State Normal Schools at Winston-Salem, Fayetteville 
and Elizabeth City are maintained by the State for the purpose of 
training teachers for the colored elementary public schools of North 
Carolina. The school at Winston-Salem was established in 1895 ; the 
school at Elizabeth City in 1891, and the school at Fayetteville in 
1877. It is confidently expected that during 1905-'06 these schools 
will be put upon a permanent basis and suitable buildings and equip- 
ment will be provided, which will render the character of the work 
done by these schools more efficient. The courses of study contained 
in this catalogue will set forth more in detail the character of the 
instruction offered. 



REGULATIONS. 



The following genera] regulations apply to all the normal schools : 

1. Pupils of both sexes are to be admitted, but all boarding pupils 
must consult the local principal before making any arrangements for 
boarding outside the school dormitories. 

2. Only pupils of good moral character will be admitted or retained 
in the schools. 

3. 2Vo pupil will be admitted to any of the schools after the opening 
iceek, except upon examination, which examination mill cover the 
previous work of the class to which admission is sought. All such 
examinations and their result must be approved by the superin- 
tendent. 

4. No pupil will be advanced to a higher class except upon the satis- 
factory completion of the work of the preceding class. All tests and 
examination questions shall be first approved by the superintendent, 
and no promotion to a higher class shall be valid except approved by 
the superintendent. 

5. The school year shall consist of eight months of twenty school 
days each. No holidays except Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day 
and New Year's Day shall be given. A Christmas recess not exceed- 
ing ten days may be given, but such recess shall not be included in the 
school year of 160 days. 

6. Three tmexcused absences or tardies during the year shall cause 
any pupil to be suspended from school for the remainder of the year. 
No principal shall accept any excuse for tardiness or absence except 
the serious sickness of the pupil or his immediate family. The super- 
intendent shall have the power to define the terms absence and tardi- 
ness. 

7. No substitute teacher shall be employed, except upon the ap- 
proval of the superintendent, and no student shall be permitted to 
teach any normal class. 

S. All students who receive free tuition shall sign a pledge to teach 
two years in the colored public schools of the State. 

9. The satisfactory completion of the work of the fourth grade of 
the elementary school as set forth in the State Course of Study will 
be required for entrance on the work of the normal course of study. 



TUITION. 



Tuition in all the normal schools is free to those who intend to 
teach in the colored public schools of North Carolina. Those who do 
not intend to teach must pay $10 a year tuition. These schools are 
maintained for the purpose of training teachers for the elementary 
public schools. It is only just and right that those who take advan- 
tage of* these schools, and who do not intend to teach, shall pay the 
tuition charges. 



COURSES OF STUDY. 



The following courses of study are offered in all the normal schools, 
subject to present limitations as to equipment. The normal school 
begins with fifth-grade work, the high school with ninth-grade work, 
and the primary school with first-grade work : 

NORMAL COURSE. 

FIRST YEAR. 

1. Reading : 

a. Phonics (spelling, writing, diacritical marks) : Harrington's 
Spelling Book, Part II, pp. 1-48 ; including the words found in the 
reading and other subjects of study. 

6. Longfellow's Song of Hiawatha, Francillon's Gods and Heroes, 
Ruskin's King of the Golden River, Hawthorne's The Great Stone 
Face. 

2. Language : 

o. The Story (oral and written). 

b. Copying and dictation by sentences and paragraphs. The copy- 
ing and dictation must not take the sentence out of its place in the 
paragraph. The relation of sentence and paragraph must be retained 
in all the work. Use the readers as the basis of the work. 

c. Hyde's Lessons I, pp. 1-158, for formal work, omitting all com- 
position and picture lessons. 

3. Drawing : 

a. Use Normal Drawing 1. The pupils are not simply to draw 
lines, but learn to draw real things, using lines. 

1). Book 2 should be taken up after Book 1 has been completed. 

4. Arithmetic : 

a. Review notation and numeration ; formal addition, subtraction, 
multiplication, and division of whole numbers, and fractions ; and 
take up : 

Z>. Decimals, compound quantities and percentage, using Colaw and 
Ellwood's Primary, pp. 228 to end. Teachers should own Werner 
Arithmetic 2. 

5. History : 

a. Read Hansen's Primary History to get a general view of the 
subject. 



b. Study — Colonies. The teacher will take up the study of the 
Colonies after plan of Guerber's Story of the Thirteen Colonies. 

6. Geography : 

a. Home Geography. Teachers will follow plan of Tarr and Me- 
Murry's Geography 1. 

h. Pupils must study the life histories of a number of common 
plants and animals by means of the school garden. 

c. Use Maury's Elementary Geography to give pupils an idea of 
the world as a whole. Teachers should own Tarr and McMurry's 
Geography 1. 

7. Science : Agriculture, Cooking. Sewing. 

second year. 

1. Reading : 

a. Phonics (spelling, writing): Harrington. Part 2, pp. 49-92; 
words from other subjects. 

b. Clarke's Story of Troy. Guerber's Story of the Greeks. Warren's 
Stories from English History. 

2. Language : 

a. Story (oral and written) ; copying and dictation. 

b. Hyde's Lessons 1, pp. 159-200, omitting all picture and composi- 
tion lessons. 

3. Drawing : 

a. See first year. 

b. Use Book 3 after 1 and 2 have been completed. 

4. Arithmetic : 

Take up no new subjects. Use Colaw and Ellwood's Advanced 
Arithmetic to strengthen and extend work already done, omitting all 
reviews and supplementary exercises. 

5. History : 

a. Study Revolution, using biographies of Washington. Adams 
(Samuel). Franklin. Henry. 

b. Read Hansen's Higher on Revolution. 
Teachers should own Fiske's War for Independence. 

6. Geography : 

Study North America, using plan of Tarr and McMurry's Geogra- 
phy 2 : Maury's Manual to end of North America, with North Caro- 
lina Geography. 



7. Science: 

Elementary Agriculture, Physiology, Cooking, Sewing. 

third year. 

1. Heading : 

a. Phonics (spelling and writing) ; review Harrington; words from 
other subjects. 

b. Poems of Knightly Adventure, Irving's Knickerbocker Stories, 
Guerber's Story of the Romans ; Selections, Whittier, Holmes. 

2. Language: 

a. The Story (oral and written) ; copying and dictation. 
1). Buehler's English Grammar begun': study Parts 2 and 3. and 
then Part 1. 

3. Drawing : 

a. See first year. 

6. Use Book 4 after 1, 2 and 3 have been completed. 

4. Arithmetic : 

See second-year work. Review of subject. 

5. Geography : 

Study Europe and the other continents after plan of Tarr and 
McMurry's Geography 3 : Maury's Manual from end of North America 
to end of book. 

6. History : 

a. Read Hansen's Higher, from Revolution to end of book. 
&. The Nation : Use biographies of Jefferson, Boone. Fulton, Whit- 
ney. Morse, Lincoln, Lee. 

c. Civil Government should be studied in connection with history. 

7. Science : 

Agriculture, Cooking and Sewing, Physiology. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

1. Reading : 

a. Phonics and complete review of spelling, with instruction how to 
teach children to read, spell and write. 

6. Holbrook's Hiawatha Primer, Claxton's Grimm's Fairy Stories. 
Baldwin's Fairy Stories and Fables, McMurry's Robinson Crusoe, 
Moulton's Bible Stories, Cook's Story of Ulysses, Pratt's Legends of 
the Red Children. 



10 



The object of reading the above books here is to make students 
thoroughly familiar with their contents and with the methods of 
teaching and using the books in the primary grades 1-4. 

2. Language : 

a. Buehler's English Grammar completed. 

b. Oral and written language work, based on the reading of this 
year, with methods of teaching language grades 1-4. 

3. Drawing : 

a. Book 5, Normal Drawing. 

h. Review of Books 1-4, and instruction in how to teach drawing, 
grades 1-4. 

4. Arithmetic : 

(/. Werner Arithmetic 3. This book contains work in elementary 
algebra and concrete geometry, as well as in higher arithmetic. 

b. Review of the subjects of notation and numeration ; addition, 
subtraction, multiplication and division of whole numbers and frac- 
tions ; simple decimals, simple compound quantities, simple percent- 
age, and how to teach these subjects, grades 1-5. 

5. History : 

a. Read Myers' General History. 

b. North Carolina History and review of the subject of history as 
contained in this course. 

6. Geography : 

a. Review of subject as outlined in this course. 

b. Geography grades 1-4, and how to teach it. 

7. Science : 

Agriculture, Cooking and Sewing, Physiology. 

PRIMARY SCHOOL COURSE. 

It is sometimes necessary, on account of the poor preparation of 
those who apply for entrance to the classes of the normal schools, to 
have a good primary school in connection with each normal. It is 
also necessary to have such a school in which candidates for gradua- 
tion from the normal schools can be required to teach successfully 
prior to graduation. 



11 



first year. 

1. Reading : 

a. Phonics — spelling and writing. 

b. Holmes' First Reader (third month), Holbrook's Hiawatha 
Primer (Geography), Claxton's Grimm's Fairy Stories (History). 

2. Language : 

a. The Story (oral only). 

b. Copying by sentences and paragraphs. 

c. Dictation by sentences and paragraphs. 

Teachers should use the readers for this work. The copying and 
dictation must not take the sentence out of its place in the paragraph. 
The relation of sentence and paragraph must always be retained. 

3. Drawing : 

a. Permit and encourage children to draw live objects such as they 
desire. 

b. Let the writing be introduced by means of drawing. 

c. Use Book 1, Normal Drawing. 

• 

4. Arithmetic : See second year. 

5. History : See Reading. 

6. Geography: 

a. See Reading. 

b. Let the children have a garden and by that means study the 
life histories of at least four common plants. Let the location deter- 
mine what plants are studied. Plants that furnish food, clothing or 
shelter will be most interesting to children. The life histories of some 
animals should also be studied. The moth, the butterfly, the toad 
and any animals which furnish food or clothing will be interesting. 

second year. 

1. Reading : 

a. Phonics — spelling and writing ; Harrington. Part 1, pp. 20-40 ; 
also words from other subjects. 

b. Holmes' Second Reader, Baldwin's Fairy Stories and Fables 
(History). McMurry's Robinson Crusoe (Geography). 

2. Language : See first year. 

3. Drawing : See first year. 



12 

4. Akitmetic : 

(i. ('(muting 1-100, using real things. 
b. Notation and numeration, 1-1000. 
C. The thirty-six addition facts. 

The teacher should use Colaw and Ellwood's Primary Arithmetic, 
pp. 1-109, omitting pp. 66-76 and pp. l-<;. 

5. History: See Heading. 

c». Geography : 

(/. Let the children have a garden. See first year. 

b. Children learn direction and get ideas of distance, form, color, 
See Drawing Work. 

c. Weather Chart : Cause of wind, rain, frost, dew, change of sea- 
sons should he learned and discussed in connection with the weather 
chart. 

third year. 

1. Heading : 

«. Phonics — spelling and writing; Part 1. Harrington, pp. 4o-7S ; 
also words from other subjects. 

b. Holmes' Third Reader. Cook's Story of Ulysses Moulton's Bible 
Stories (History). 

2. Language: 

a. The Story (oral and written). 

b. Copying and dictation. See first year. 

c. Teachers should do formal work. Hyde's Lessons 1. pp. 1-70, 
omitting all picture and composition lessons. Children must not have 
the book. 

3. Drawing : See first year. 

4. Arithmetic : 

a. Formal addition, subtraction, multiplication and division. 

b. Colaw and Ellwood's Primary, pp. 109-203. Children may have 
the book for first time. Teachers should own Werner Arithmetic 1. 

5. History : 

Bible Stories. See Reading. 

(». Geography: 

a. Home Geography — local soil, land and water forms: roads, rail- 
roads, trade and manufacturing; relation of plants ami animals to 
soil ; life histories of some common plants and animals. See first 
year. 



13 

b. Teach children to draw to a scale the school-house and grounds ; 
the township and county, locating the roads, the railroads, the post- 
offices and their own dwellings. 

fourth year. 

1. Reading : 

a. Phonics — spelling and writing, diacritical marks ; Harrington, 
Part 1, pp. 20-78, in review ; also words from other subjects. 

b. Holmes' Fourth Reader, Francillon's Gods and Heroes, Moulton's 
Bible Stories (New Testament). 

2. Language : 

a. The Story (oral and written) ; copying and dictation. See first 
year. 

b. Hyde's Language Lessons 1, pp. 1-70, omitting all picture and 
composition lessons. Children may have language book in their hands 
for the first time. 

3. Drawing: 

a. See first-year work. 

b. Use Book 2 after Book 1 has been completed. 

4. Arithmetic : 

a. Review previous work and teach common fractions. 

b. Colaw and Ellwood's Primary, pp. 209-227. Add many practical 
examples. Teachers should own Werner Arithmetic 1. 

5. History: 

a. Bible Stories. (See Reading). 

b. Exploration and Discovery : Use stories of Columbus, Cortez, De 
Soto ; Cabot, Drake, Raleigh ; Cartier, Champlain, La Salle ; Hudson. 
Teachers and pupils will find Shaw's Discoveries and Explorers, 
Eggleston's Great Americans, and Montgomery's Beginners' American 
History helpful books. 

6. Geography: 

a. Use Home Geography in Tarr and McMurry's Geography 1. 

b. Continue to study life histories of some common plants and ani- 
mals by means of the school garden. 

c. Begin to study Maury's Elementary latter part of year. 
Teachers should use Tarr and McMurry's Geography 1 for supple- 
mentary work. 

The Primary School will be in charge of a supervising teacher, 
working under the superintendent and the local principal. The regu- 
lar normal teachers and the fourth-year normal pupils will assist in 



14 

the teaching. The daily programmes will be made by the superin- 
tendent to suit local needs and conditions. 

HIGH-SCHOOL COURSE. 

The high-school course will include agriculture, mathematics, Engf- 
lish, history, drawing, and domestic science. This course will em- 
brace four years and will follow the State high-school course of study 
as to details. All who complete the normal course satisfactorily are 
eligible to take up the work of the high-school course. 



ELIZABETH CITY 



COLORED NORMAL SCHOOL 



l904-'05 



(FOURTEENTH YEAR) 



THE SESSION OF igo5-'o6 BEGINS SEPTEMBER 18, 1905 



LOCAL BOARD OF MANAGERS: 

E. F. Lamb, President. J. B. Leigh, Treasurer. 

S. L. Sheep, Secretary. W. G. Gaither, 

R. W. Askew. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE: 

E. F. Lamb, S. L. Sheep, 

J. B. Leigh. 



TEACHERS: 

P. W. Moore, Principal. 
John T. Doles, Sarah H. Edwards, 

John H. Bias, Bessie E. George, 

Kathryn M. Johnson, Fannie O. Butler. 



17 



FOURTH-YEAR PUPILS. 
School Year, September 12, 1904, to May 26, 1905. 



Names of Students. 



n 



County. 



Armstrong, Maggie G. 
Archie, Lucy C 

Bess, Annie B 

Beaman, Berneta C. — 

Bright, March 

Bryant, J. J 

Brothers, E. Luther — 

Brown, Mrs. Ida A 

Cale, Mrs. Fannie B.-- 

Collins, Moses 

Calvert, Ruth A 

Douglass, Wm. N. 

Duers, Jessie L. 

Daughtry, Luetta A. - 

Felton, Ellenor E. 

Felton, Ambrose M 

Hawkins, Laura J 

Hawkins, Christian — 

Hill, S. W 

Harvey, Mattie L. 

Jenkins, Golena O 

Jones, Mrs. M. E 

Johnson, Alice I 

Jacocks, Vina L 

Kornegay, Raleigh W. 

Maloy, Hattie B 

Maloy, Lillie M 

Mizell, Annie J 

Mebane, Hattie A. 

Midgett, Mary E 

Newby, Maggie E 

Overton, Luther D 

Piland, Emily O 

2 



Oct. 

Sept. 
Sept. 
Oct. 
Nov. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
3 Oct. 

3 | Oct. 
5 j Oct. 

4 | Sept. 
4 j Sept. 

Oct. 
Oct. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Mar. 
Sept. 



6 | Sept. 
5 j Sept. 
4 ' Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

April 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 



29 Perquimans. 
21 Perquimans. 

19 j Washington. 
3 ' Gates. 

15 Pasquotank. 
21 Martin. 
12 Pasquotank. 
12 Pasquotank. 

17 Pasquotank. 
3 Perquimans. 

27 Northampton. 

18 Perquimans. 
3 Pasquotank. 

12 I Perquimans. 
12 I Perquimans. 
29 Perquimans. 
15 j Chowan. 
12 | Chowan. 
12 Tyrrell. 
12 I Pasquotank. 

20 | Bertie. 
Pasquotank. 
Pasquotank. 
Perquimans. 
Lenoir. 
Pasquotank. 
Pasquotank. 
Bertie. 
Pasquotank. 
Pasquotank. 
Pasquotank. 
Pasquotank. 



21 ' Gates. 



18 



FOURTH-YEAR PUPILS— Continued. 



Name of Students. 



Peel, Malustus 

Robbins, Lillie E. — 
Smallwood, Wm. A. 
Sharp, Pearlie G. -- 
Sharp, Lala L. 



22 

17 

| 22 

19 

J22 

Sumner, Mary E. — — 23 
Sawyer, Sarah F. 1 18 



Skinner, Ferribee G. 

Snowden, Ida V. 

Skinner, Ellen E. — 
Taylor, Lemuel A. -- 

Thomas, Kate V 

Trafton, Eliza L. V.- 
Taylor, Lillie B 

Willie, Mary E. 

Williams, J. C 

Williams, Nelie F. - 

Webb, Lucy C 

White, Lucy A 



Date of 
Entrance. 



124 


2 


31 


8 


170 


4 


165 


5 


170 


5 


130 


5 


84 


3 


71 


2 


113 


3 


177 


4 



2 I Sept. 

3 J Sept. 
3 Oct. 
2 Oct. 

2 Oct. 

3 Oct. 
3 Sept. 

2 Sept. 

3 Apr. 
Dec. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 



County. 



Martin. 
Pasquotank. 
14 ; Bertie. 
18 Hertford. 
13 Hertford. 

3 Perquimans. 
12 Pasquotank. 
17 Perquimans. 
17 | Camden. 

2 Phila., Pa. 
28 Pasquotank. 

12 Pasquotank. 

13 Camden. 
12 Sampson. 
12 ! Hyde. 

12 Pasquotank. 
17 Northampton. 

13 Perquimans. . 
12 '' Pasquotank. 



THIRD-YEAR PUPILS. 
School Teak, September 12, 1904, to May 26, 1905. 



Ashby, Mamie E. — 
Badham, Chas. E.— 

Bowe, Cora W 

Brinkley, Maggie A 
Blunt, James N. --- 
Barnes, Lucretia--- 
Coleman, Maggie E. 

Cooper, Lamb N 

Cherry, Sillena C. — 
Dancy, Martha A. - 
Dickens, Mary E. — 
Dickens, Maggie L. 



17 


154 


3 


17 


177 


4 


16 


158 


5 


22 


150 


5 


24 


165 


3 


19 


90 


5 


16 


173 


2 


18 


163 


4 


25 


128 


4 


21 


60 


8 


18 


23 




20 


23 





Oct. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Oct. 
Nov. 
Sept. 
Apr. 
Apr. 



Camden. 

Chowan. 

Pasquotank. 

Norfolk. 

Northampton. 

Chowan. 

Norfolk. 

Bertie. 

Bertie. 

Edgecombe. 

Pasquotank. 

Pasquotank. 



19 



THIRD- YEAR PUPILS— Continued. 



Names of Students. 



bo 
< 


a 


II 


Date of 
Entrance. 


County. 


22 


60 


2 


Nov. 


9 


Northampton. 


19 


176 


3 


Sept. 


15 


Dare. 


20 


30 


3 


Nov. 


8 


Bertie. 


26 


34 


3 


Oct. 


10 


Pasquotank. 


23 


36 


2 


Sept. 


12 


Pitt. 


20 


36 


2 


Sept. 


12 


Pitt. 


18 


141 


3 


Sept. 


12 


Pasquotank. 


22 


33 


2 


Mar. 


30 


Bertie. 


22 


180 


5 


Sept. 


12 


Bertie. 


21 


64 




Oct. 


24 


Martin. 


32 


28 




Mar. 


30 


Beaufort. 


18 


175 


5 


Sept. 


12 


Pasquotank. 


24 


126 


5 


Oct. 


4 


Norfolk. 


17 


170 


2 


Sept. 


12 


Pasquotank. 


24 


94 





Jan. 


3 


Bertie. 


19 


85 


3 


Jan. 


3 


Northampton. 


20 


85 





Jan. 


3 


Northampton. 


19 


37 




Sept. 


12 


Martin. 


43 


29 




Sept. 


13 


Pitt. 


24 


36 


2 


April 


7 


Northampton. 


20 


100 


2 


Oct. 


11 


Washington. 


20 


174 


3 


Sept. 


12 


Martin. 


17 


185 


4 


Sept. 


12 


Pasquotank. 


23 


80 


3 


Sept. 


12 


Pitt. 


■22 


44 


5 


Sept. 


12 


Washington. 


21 


136 


3 


Sept. 


12 


Washington. 


19 


141 


4 


Sept. 


30 


Bertie. 


21 


152 


4 


Oct. 


21 


Bertie. 


91 


36 




Sept. 


91 










Sept. 
Nov. 






20 


103 


2 


25 


Northampton. 


20 


60 


3 


Sept. 


29 


Hyde. 








Sept. 






17 


153 




Sept. 


12 




17 


177 


2 


Sept. 


12 


Pasquotank. 



Garris, James E 

Hopkins, Izetta R. . 

Hall, Minnie G 

Hinton, Kittie V 

Highsmith, John I. 

Highsmith, Louis H 

Hinton, Clarkie 

Jenkins, David 

Jones, George T 

James, William R. 

Lacy, Luther 

Mann, Clifton E 

Moore, James H 

Overton, Lizzie I 

Outlaw, John L. 

Person, Lewis 

Person, Willie 

Peel, Martha G 

Patrick, Mrs. Mollie E. 

Porch, Katie L 

Rosom, James H. 

Reeves, Julia M 

Stalling, Annie G. 

Staton, Dora M 

Sutton, Hattie M 

Sutton, Arthur N 

Thompson, James E 

Thompson, Arthur C 

Tillett, John J 

Taylor, Addie V 

Vincent, Solomon L 

Willie, Edward H. 

Woodhouse, Martha A. 

Wilson, Nina B. 

Whitehurst, Olivia W 



20 



SECOND-YEAR PUPILS. 
School Year, September 12, 1904, to May 20, 1905. 



Names of Students. 



Date of 
Entrance. 



County. 



Anthony, Martha A. - 
Archie, Martha P. --- 

Askew, Elizabeth 

Barnes, Rhoda 

Barrow, Maliss E. -— 

Bonner, Annie 

Bright, Susie E. 

Borden, Beatrice E.— 

Baker, Sterling E 

Bonner, Mary E. 

Bass, Frank 

Beaman, Emma L. — 

Beverly, Mary N. 

Beaman, Arosie P.— 

Brown, Joseph E 

Christian, Sarah F. — 
Cartwright, Roxanna 
Cartwright, Addie P. 

Cherry, Malinda 

Dickens, Lula E 

Dillahunt, Susie E. — 

Dey, Apollas 

Etheridge, General J. 

Everett, Daisy I 

Gordon, Joseph H 

Gray, Mittie A. 

Green, Mary E. 

Hawkins, Etta L 

Hollowell, Josephine 

Howard, Judie A 

Holly, Ella E 

Hyman, James J 

Harris, Wm. Pearl — 



| 103 
1 97 
115 
177 
64 
177 
169 
178 
103 
135 



16 


17 


20 


22 


19 


160 


20 


54 


23 


100 


18 


115 


20 


20 


17 


177 


18 


52 


16 


55 


19 


130 


16 


164 


24 


119 


19 


175 


21 


65 


17 


68 


23 


10 


16 


169 


19 


81 


19 


68 


22 


165 



j 152 
1 63 



Jan. 
Jan. 
Oct. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Jan. 
Nov. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Nov. 
Apr. 
Sept. 
Oct. 
Jan. 
Nov. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Jan. 
Sept. 
Jan. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Oct. 
Oct. 



Halifax. 

Perquimans. 

Bertie. 

Beaufort. 

Hyde. 

Beaufort. 

Pasquotank. 



15 Lenoir. 



Halifax. 

Northampton. 

Pasquotank. 

Gates. 

Hertford. 

Gates. 

Onslow. 

Princess Anne 

Pasquotank. 

Chowan. 

Bertie. 

Pasquotank. 
14 I Craven. 
12 Currituck. 
12 Currituck. 



Washington. 

Perquimans. 

Hyde. 

Martin. 

Pasquotank. 

Pasquotank. 

Hyde. 
28 I Pasquotank. 
21 j Bertie. 
4 Warren. 



21 



SECOND-YEAR PUPILS-Continued. 



Names of Students. 



County. 



Hunter, Hugh Jas. -- 
Johnson, Martha A. - 
Jordan, Phillip W. — 

Maloy, Mary L. 

Midgett, William R. - 

Moore, Teeoscar 

Outlaw, Jennie Lee-- 
Perkins, Angerona-— 
Peebles, Lela May — 
Perkins, Malinda A. - 
Rogers, Mrs. Mary--- 
Rayner, Madison T. -- 

Skinner, Amy L 

Sumner, Maggie P. -- 

Sharp, Lillian B 

Smith, Rebecca C 

Smith, Buelah G 

Styron, Cora M 

Simpson, George 

Tillett, Ida B 

Turner, Isiah 

Woodhouse, Mary J. - 
Woodly, Oscar F. 

Williams, Willie 

Wilson, Ida 

Williams, Cora 



17 20 

16 168 

. — J 150 

17 ' 178 



22 ! 175 



Jan. 
Sept. 
Nov. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Nov. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Jan. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Oct. 
Jan. 
Nov. 
Nov. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Oct. 
Sept. 
Oct. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Jan. 



Beaufort. 

Pasquotank. 

Beaufort. 

Pasquotank. 

Pasquotank. 

Chowan. 
3 Bertie. 
13 Currituck. 
12 | Northampton. 



Pasquotank. 

Pasquotank. 

Bertie. 

Pasquotank. 

Perquimans. 



24 ! Gates. 



Halifax. 

Bertie. 

Craven. 

Hyde. 
12 Camden. 
4 Camden. 
15 Pasquotank. 
19 Dare. 
12 i Camden. 
12 i Currituck. 
17 Martin. 



22 



FIRST-YEAR 
School Yeab, Septembeb 12, 



PUPILS. 
1904, to May 26, 1905. 



Names of Students. 



En^anl ! bounty. 



Brinne, Minnie M. 

Brown, Jessie B 

Brown, Esther C. - 
Barnes, Elenora L. 
Brockett, Katie E. 
Burden, Lizzie* — 

Boston, Noah 

Banks, Mahalie — 



13 
18 
15 
17 
Barnard, Mary I — I 23 



Bradshaw, Bertha 

Bright, John F 

Brewer, Fletcher 

Barcliffe, John W. C. 

Cogdell, Cora A. 

Carter, Mary 

Cherry, Rachel E 

Coffey, Pauline 

Cox, Mettie L. 

Cooper, Minnie O 

Corprew, Adelaide 

Dickens, Maria 

Freeman, Maggie G.* 

Felton, Ella B 

Felton, Crene J. 

Gaskins, Juda A. 

Gallop, Lethia 

Gray, Benjamin 

Holloman, Willie B 

Houcutt, Marie L. 

Hoggard, Maggie 

Holland, Bertha A 

Harrell, Bruce 19 

Holly, Anna ' 16 



Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Nov. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Sept. 

Jan. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Jan. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Jan. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Dec. 



12 Perquimans. 

12 : Pasquotank. 

28 ! Bertie. 
I 
3 ' Perquimans. 

23 Pasquotank. 
12 ! Pasquotank. 

24 Martin. 

20 Pasquotank. 

19 | Currituck. 
12 j Hyde. 

23 Pasquotank. 

25 Northampton. 
12 Perquimans. 
12 Lenoir. 

3 Bertie. 

10 Bertie. 

11 Beaufort. 

28 j Perquimans. 

12 Bertie. 

12 ! Currituck. 
3 Halifax. 
12 ' Pasquotank. 
15 I Gates. 

3 j Perquimans. 

4 ' Hyde. 

6 | Currituck. 

3 j Hyde. 
12 i Currituck. 
12 Pasquotank. 

20 Pasquotank. 

12 Perquimans. 
11 Halifax. 

13 Pasquotank. 



f Deceased. 



23 



FIRST-YEAR PUPILS-Continued. 



Names of Students. 



Holly, Esther A 

Haley, Lizzie 

Hurdle, Elnora 

Hollowell, Mary E 

Hollowell, Christopher 
Harrison, Carrie B. 



18 
15 
15 
16 
17 
18 

Hall, Nannie W — I 16 

Hayes, Mamie E : 18 

Harrison, Katie L 1 21 

Johnson, Ida M. 16 

Jordan, Sylvia 22 

James, Julia A 18 

Jones, Alexander 19 

Johnson, Sarah F. 18 

Jenkins, Dukin W 

Jenkins, Minie S. 

Keys, Chelsie ' 

Keys, Carttie 

Leigh, Mrs. John 

Leigh, Roy 

Lewis, Florence 

Long, Mamie 

Metz, Yetta L.* 

Midgett, Minnie 

Moore, Ruth S i 13 

Nixon, Howard S. 23 

Newby, Benjamin 16 

Overton, James E 16 

Overton, Mary L. 13 

Phelps, Estella 17 

Pool, Eugene 18 

Pool, Malinda A 18 

Patterson, Brittana C 16 

Paster, Martha A 1 18 



16 


102 


19 


140 


17 


140 


26 


30 


14 


122 


.17 


30 


18 


158 






18 


60 



Dec. 

Nov. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Sept. 

Sept. 
4 Sept. 
3 Nov. 
8 Dec. 
6 Dec. 
8 '■ Jan. 



Pasquotank. 

Currituck. 

Gates. 

Pasquotank. 

Pasquotank. 

Washington. 

Bertie. 

Bertie. 

Washington. 

Pasquotank. 

Beaufort. 



25 I Northampton. 



Jan. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

8 Sept. 

9 Sept. 

5 Oct. 

6 Nov. 



Perquimans. 

Pasquotank. 

Bertie. 

Bertie. 

Beaufort. 

Beaufort. 

Pasquotank. 

Pasquotank. 

Beaufort. 

Northampton. 

Lenoir. 

Pasquotank. 
23 ] Pasquotank. 
4 : Perquimans. 
17 Pasquotank. 

22 ; Pasquotank. 

I 

23 ! Pasquotank. 
13 Pasquotank. 
12 Pasquotank. 
12 Pasquotank. 
20 ' Currituck. 

7 Beaufort. 



'Deceased. 



24 



FIRST-YEAR PUPILS-Continued. 



Names of Students. 



Date of 
Entrance. 



County. 



Peterson, Maggie R. - 

Peterson, Annie C 

Perkins, Caroline 

Peebles, Annie R. 

Riddick, Ella B 

Riddick, Daisy L 

Riddick, Isabella 

Rice, Cradie E 

Riddick, Susie E 

Spellman, Maud R 

Sawyer, Minnie 

Skinner, Roxana 

Stephenson, Madie 

Stalling, Mary A 

Simpson, Elner F. 

Simpson, Hattie A. — 

Smith, Bessie A 

Tripp, Hattie 

Todd, Mattie 

Tillett, Charles E. — 
Targinton, Fannie C. 

Taylor, Lucy 

Walston, Lina 

Whitehurst, Ada E. - 
Whitehurst. Mary I. - 

White, Pauline 

Westcott, Lurana B.- 
Webb, Emma 

White, Hattie 

Williams, Sallie 

Watson, Mettie 

Williams, Thomas --- 



Jan. 
Jan. 

Jan. 

Feb. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Mar. 

Sept. 

Jan. 

Sept. 
8 Sept. 
4 Oct. 

3 Oct. 

4 Sept. 

4 I Sept. 

t 
3 j Dec. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Jan. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Jan. 

Jan. 



3 Bertie. 
3 i Bertie. 
3 I Currituck. 
6 Northampton. 
12 : Gates. 

12 Gates. 

13 ! Pasquotank. 
13 ! Pasquotank. 
21 Gates. 

11 ! Currituck. 

12 ! Pasquotank. 

13 j Pasquotank. 
18 Northampton . 

3 I Gates. 
23 I Pasquotank. 
23 I Pasquotank. 

5 Pasquotank. 
10 Beaufort. 
10 : Pitt. 
12 ! Bertie. 
23 ' Pasquotank. 

3 ' Bertie. 
12 ! Pasquotank. 
12 Pasquotank. 
23 , Pasquotank. 
12 ! Pasquotank. 

12 ■ Currituck. 
21 Perquimans. 
10 Pasquotank. 

14 I Norfolk, Va. 

13 j Bertie. 
17 ! Martin. 



25 



POST-GRADUATE PUPILS. 
School Year, September 12, 1904, to May 26, 1905. 



Names of Students. 



to a 




68 




34 





27 





5 




38 




20 




20 




35 




15 




10 




35 




15 




5 





Brinkley, Clotee 

Cooper, H. D 

Cooper, Mrs. Roberta A. 

Cherry, David K. 

Gregory, Sarah F. 

Lewis, Jos. A. 

Newby, Julia E. 

Phelps, Lela A. 

Riddick, John T 

Warren, Herbert 

Wilson, Mary E. 

Jordan, B. F. 

Staton, Robert A 



Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Sept. 
Oct. 
Mar. 



April 10 



Norfolk, Va. 

Bertie. 

Pasquotank. 

Bertie. 

Chowan. 

Pasquotank. 

Pasquotank. 

Chowan. 

Pasquotank. 

Pasquotank. 

Currituck. 

Beaufort. 

Martin. 



ENROLLMENT FOR 1904-1905— SUMMARY. 

Number of pupils in first-year class— males, 14 ; females, 85. 
Number of pupils in second-year class — males, 17 ; females, 42. 
Number of pupils in third-year class — males, 22 ; females, 25. 
Number of pupils in fourth-year class — males, 12 ; females, 40. 
Number of pupils in post-graduate class — males, 7; females, 6. 

Total number of students in the Normal Department 270 

Primary School 54 

Grand total 324 

The average daily attendance in the Primary School was 47 ; enroll- 
ment, 54. 



26 

CLASS OF 1905. 

The following students completed the normal course of study during 
the year 1904-'05 : 

Felton, Ellenor E Winfall, N. C. 

Daughtry, Lenetta A Winfall, N. C. 

Skinner, Ferribee G Durant's Neck, N. C. 

Midgett, Mary E Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Hawkins, Laura J Edenton, N. C. 

Robbins, Lillie E Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Sawyer, Sarah F Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Sumner, Mary E Durant's Neck, N. C. 

Newby, Maggie E Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Mebane, Hattye A Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Kornegay, Raleigh W Kinston, N. C. 

Mizell, Annie J Colerain, N. C. 

Taylor, Lillie B Clinton, N. C. 

Skinner, Ellen E , Philadelphia, Pa. 

Smallwood, William A Quitsna, N. C. 

Brown, Mrs. Ida A Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Thomas, Kate V Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Harvey, Mattye L Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Brothers, Edward L Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Trafton, Eliza Lillian V Belcross, N. C. 

Calvert, Ruth A Margarettsville, N. C. 

Bright, March Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Jenkins, Golena O Colerain, N. C 

White, Lucy A Elizabeth City, N. C. 



OTHER INFORMATION. 



The expenses for board and washing for calendar month are $7 for 
young men and $6 for young women. Young women who board them- 
selves will pay for room rent and fuel $1.75 per calendar month. 

This school has several school organizations, among them the Young 
Men's Christian Association and the Young Women's Christian Asso- 
ciation, which do much to aid the moral and religious life of the stu- 
dents. 

For any information not contained in this catalogue, address the 
Principal, P. W. Moore, Elizabeth City, N. C. 



FAYETTEVILLE 



COLORED NORMAL SCHOOL 



l904-'05 



(twenty-eighth year) 



THE SESSION OF l905-'06 BEGINS MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 1905 



LOCAL BOARD OF MANAGERS: 
H. L. Cook, Chairman, H. W. Lilly, Treasurer, 

Q. K. Nimmocks, Secretary, L. C. Brodgen, 
R. F. DeVane. 



TEACHERS: 

E. E. Smith, Principal. 
J. A. Croom, J. F. K. Simpson, 

Mrs. Lena S. Perry, Miss Emma J. Council, 

Miss I. G. Jacobs. 



SOCIETIES. 



The Normal School Literary Society meets once a week. The Nor- 
mal Band of Hope, a temperance society, meets once a month. These 
societies are under the supervision and direction of the Normal School 
teachers. 



BOARD. 



Board costs $5 to $7 per month. Students who board in private 
families must conform to the regulations of the school and be subject 
to the advice and direction of the principal in the selection of board- 
ing accommodations. 



30 



FOURTH-YEAR PUPILS. 
School Teak, September 5, 1904, to May 19, 1905. 



Names of Students. 



Barnes, Boisy W. 

Bayne, Florrie 

Broadfoot, Florrie* 

Brown, Bertha M. 

Covington, Edward 

Freeman, Alice 

Gore, Daniel C 

Guion, Callie 

Hall, Charlotte 

Halliday, Theresa 

Haywood, Martha J 

McDonald, Minnie 

McLauchlin, William H. 

McKay, Pinkey 

McMillan, George W. — 

McMillan, Henry T 

McPhail, Rachel 

Price, Pierre B 

Reeves, Rosetta 

Sampson, Sadie 

Simmons, Rowena 

Simpson, John L. 

Smith, George W 

Stokes, Rosa E 

Thaggard, Samuel W 

Wilder, Chester A 

Williams, Mattie H. 

Wood, Lena A. 



1 


c 
2 n 


if 

iHIH 


Date of 
Entrance. 


County. 


20 


160 


2 


Sept. 


19 


Edgecombe. 


18 


142 


7 I Sept. 


5 


Cumberland. 


17 


8 





Sept. 


5 


Cumberland. 


21 


162 





Sept. 


9 


Robeson. 


19 


136 





Sept. 


26 


Robeson. 


18 


168 





Sept. 


5 


Cumberland. 


24 


88 





Jan. 


16 


Brunswick. 


23 


162 


2 


Sept. 


12 


Bladen. 


17 


132 


4 


Sept. 


5 


Cumberland. 


19 


157 


7 


Sept. 


5 


Cumberland. 


24 


104 


1 


Oct. 


24 


Montgomery. 


18 


120 


4 


Sept. 


12 


Cumberland. 


23 


144 





Sept. 


12 


Cumberland. 


19 


160 


1 


Sept. 


12 


Cumberland. 


18 


138 


3 


Sept. 


26 


Cumberland. 


21 


168 





Sept. 


5 


Robeson. 


22 


130 


4 1 


Sept. 


12 


Cumberland. 


17 


160 


! 


Sept. 


19 


Edgecombe. 


21 


128 


5 


Sept. 


5 


Cumberland. 


19 1 


96 


9 


Sept. 


5 


New Hanover. 


16 


168 


1 


Sept. 


5 


Cumberland. 


21 


149 





Sept. 


26 


Bladen. 


17 


108 


3 


Sept. 


19 


Cumberland. 


22,! 


80 





Nov. 


21 


Wayne. 


17 


153 


7 


Sept. 


12 


Cumberland. 


18 


157 


9 | 


Sept. 


19 


Stanly. 


22 


148 


2 


Sept. 


26 


Chatham. 


18 


151 


4 i 


Sept. 


5 


Cumberland. 



* Deceased. 



31 

THIRD-YEAR PUPILS. 

School Year, September 5, 1904, to May 19. 1905. 



Names of Students. o 

Barham, James 15 

Barney, Caroline 16 

Black, John W 18 

Bonds, John P. 27 

Boykin, Lillie C. 14 

Brown, Lena May 16 

Chestnutt, Herbert 17 

Carver, Eliza 24 

Coley, Robert F 23 

Cox, Priscilla 17 

Cromartie, Lettie 22 

Dunn, Ralph 18 

Evans, Ida J. 22 

Evans, William A 20 

Fleming, John W. '-- 23 

Jiggetts, Carrie B. 17 

Johnson, Lena A 21 

Jones, Estella 16 

McAlister, Annette 17 

McAlister, Adam 18 

Mclntyre, Lula 19 

McKay, Mary E 22 

McPhail, Ida G 18 

Melvin, Dora 19 

Melvin, Nellie 17 

Parker, Olivia 20 

Ray, Elijah L. 20 

Ray, Frank A 22 

Smith, Irene D 19 

Williams, George H 16 

Williams, Lizzie A. 20 



i| If E^ranl County. 



104 


4 


Sept. 


26 


Cumberland. 


121 


3 


Sept. 


5 


Cumberland. 


86 





Oct. 


24 


Robeson. 


90 


1 


Sept. 


19 


Cumberland. 


2 





Sept. 


5 


Cumberland. 


116 


5 


Sept. 


5 


Cumberland. 


84 


9 


Sept. 


5 


Cumberland. 


67 


2 


Feb. 


14 


Cumberland. 


169 





Sept. 


5 


Wayne. 


81 





Nov. 


21 


Wayne. 


102 


3 


Sept. 


29 


Bladen. 


62 


7 


Sept. 


26 


Cumberland. 


90 


3 


Oct. 


24 


Cumberland. 


79 


2 


Sept. 


19 


Cumberland. 


85 





Nov. 


7 


Sampson. 


142 





Sept. 


26 


Robeson. 


90 


2 


Sept. 


19 


Cumberland. 


169 





Sept. 


5 


Bladen. 


150 





Sept. 


5 


Cumberland. 


94 


6 


Sept. 


5 


Cumberland. 


86 


7 


Sept. 


19 


Cumberland. 


146 


6 


Sept. 


5 


Cumberland. 


128 





Nov. 


7 


Cumberland. 


128 





Nov. 


7 


Cumberland. 


78 





Nov. 


7 


Cumberland. 


69 


3 


Sept. 


29 


Cumberland. 


91 





Sept. 


5 


Cumberland. 


51 





Sept. 


19 


Cumberland. 


22 


3 


Oct. 


11 


Cumberland. 


149 1 


4 


Sept. 


19 


Chatham. 



►SECOND-YEAR PUPILS. 
School Year, September 5, 1904, to May 19. 1905. 



Names of Students. 



Anderson, Mary A. 

Armstrong, Herbert 

Armstrong-, Minnie 

Black, William 

Blackman, Mary C. 

Brown, Ida M. 

Brown, Queen Ella 

Byrd, Louisa 

Carver, George W 

Colvin, Sarah C. 

Covington, Susie . 

Evans, Stella i 

Geddie, Marsana 1 

Hawkins, Callie ! 

Hill, Margaret D. 1 

Jackson, Lula 

Justice, Washington 1 

Lewis, Charles i 

Mallett, Maud 

McKethan, Geneva 1 

McNeill, Ella I 

Mears, John W ! 

Melvin, Amerida , 

Monroe, Caroline 

Monroe, Hattie j 

Murchison, Annie ' 

Newell, Aurelia C. 

Poe, Addie C 

Ray, Mary C. 

Reeves, Augusta ; 

Robinson, Emma 

Robinson, Eliza 

Robinson, Lillie 



18 j 


91 


19 ! 


20 


16 


164 


20 


82 


17 1 


114 


18 


90 


» 


21 


16 


3 


39 


43 



Date of 
Entrance. 



County. 



Sept. 
Jan. 
Sept. 
Nov. 
Sept. 
Oct. 
Nov. 
Nov. 
Nov. 
Nov. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Oct. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Feb. 
Oct. 
Dec. 



3 Nov. 
! Sept. 

; Sept. 

2 Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Dec. 

1 I Sept. 
, Dec. 

3 j Oct. 
Dec. 
j Jan. 

Jan. 

1 Jan. 



26 Cumberland. 

9 Cumberland. 

12 Cumberland. 

21 Robeson. 

5 Cumberland. 

11 Warren. 
7 Scotland. 

16 Cumberland. 

14 Cumberland. 

15 Columbus. 
29 , Cumberland. 

12 ] Cumberland. 
10 Cumberland. 
12 Cumberland. 

5 Cumberland. 

19 Cumberland. 

14 Cumberland. 

24 Johnston. 

12 Harnett. 

28 Cumberland. 

5 Bladen. 

5 Bladen. 

12 Cumberland. 

26 Cumberland. 

12 Cumberland. 

19 Cumberland. 



Bladen. 

Cumberland. 

Cumberland. 

Cumberland. 

Bladen. 

Bladen. 

Bladen. 



33 



SECOND-YEAR PUPILS— Continued. 



Names of Students. 



5 «2 



Date of 
Entrance. 



County. 



Robinson, Stella ; 20 

Scarborough, Minnie 21 

Simonds, Allen 21 

Smith, Catherine 23 

Surles, Marcus : 20 

Taylor, Mary S I — I 17 



Tucker, Andrew : 20 

Williams, Ethel j 18 

Williams, Hettie j 19 

Williams, Vance j 19 



Sept. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Sept. 
Dec. 



26 Cumberland. 

Cumberland. 

Union. 
9 Richmond. 
14 Cumberland. 
12 ; Cumberland. 



5 ! Cumberland. 
Sept. 26 ! Cumberland. 
: Jan. 16 Cumberland. 
i Dec. 19 i Cumberland. 



FIRST-YEAR PUPILS. 
School Teae, September 5, 1904, to May 19, 1905. 



Brown, Nettie 17 

Brown, Virginia 15 

Bryant, Maggie j 18 

Evans, Willie j 19 

Freeman, Pearce ; 15 

Hall, Rosa D 13 

Hayes, Theodosia 20 

Hurst, Emma 14 

Hurst, Lillie 11 

Johnson, Lacy j 14 

Jones, Arthur ! 19 

Kelly, Maggie 1 26 

Kelly, Robert 1 17 

Maynor, Irvin 16 

McAlister, Cornelia 12 

McAlister, William J 19 

McDonald, Amos 1 48 

McDonald, Sandy ; 25 

McKay, Irene [ 17 

McKay, Josephine 1 19 



' Sept. 
Sept. 
j Sept. 
! Sept. 
Jan. 



Sept. 
Sept. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Oct. 
3 ; Nov. 

2 j Dee. 
| Nov. 

3 : Sept. 

Sept. 
Sept. 
Nov. 
Nov. 
Sept. 



6 i Nov. 



Cumberland. 
Cumberland. 
Cumberland. 
26 , Cumberlrnd. 
10 Cumberland. 
12 | Cumberland. 
26 i Sampson. 

9 Cumberland. 

9 Cumberland. 
10 i Cumberland. 

7 | Scotland. 

5 Cumberland. 

9 Cumberland. 
26 Cumberland. 
12 Cumberland. 

5 ! Cumberland. 

7 j Cumberland. 
28 i Cumberland. 
26 i Cumberland. 

9 j Cumberland. 



34 



FIRST-YEAR PUPILS— Continued. 



Names of Students. 



McKay, Merelon 

McKay, Walter 

McNeill, Florence- — 

Melvin, Nancy 

Miller, Maggie B. --- 

Monroe, Nellie 

Monroe, Nina 

Ray, Daniel 

Simpson, Dancy 

Townsend, Everlina- 
Whitehead, Leslie--- 

Whitted, Sarah 

Whitted, John 

Williams, Alice 

Williams, Melissa — 
Williams, Roxana-- 
Wright, Elsie 





c 


be 
< 


>. 'S, 


18 


21 


16 


18 


16 


67 


19 


43 


14 


134 


16 


37 


17 


52 


14 


52 


17 


22 


15 


60 


17 


21 


20 


117 


20 


69 


17 


91 


17 


42 


17 


37 


18 


41 



Date of 
Entrance. 



Jan. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Sept. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Feb. 
Jan. 
I Feb. 
J Jan. 
[ Sept. 
3 : Jan. 

2 | Nov. 
J Sept. 
Dec. 

3 Dec. 



County. 

Cumberland. 

Cumberland. 

Robeson. 

Cumberland. 

Cumberland. 

Cumberland. 

Cumberland. 

Cumberland. 

Bladen. 

Cumberland. 

Bladen. 

Bladen. 

Bladen. 

Cumberland. 

Cumberland. 

Cumberland. 

Cumberland. 



PRIMARY SCHOOL. 

The enrollment in the Primary School reached 94. with a daily 
average attendance of 42. 

SUMMARY OF ENROLLMENT. 

Fourth-year pupils 28 . 

Third-year pupils 31 

Second-year pupils 43 

First-year pupils 37 

Total 139 

Primary School 94 



OTHER INFORMATION. 



Those desiring more definite and particular information should 
write to the Principal. E. E. Smith. Fayetteville, N. C 



SLATER STATE 



COLORED NORMAL SCHOOL 



(WIXSTON-SALEM) 



!904-'05 



(TENTH year) 



THE SESSION OF l905-'06 BEGINS SEPTEMBER 28, 1905 



LOCAL BOARD OF MANAGERS: 
H. E. Fries, President. W. A. Blair, Treasurer. 

S. G. Atkins, Secretary. A. H. Eller, 

H. R. Starbuck. 



TEACHERS: 

C. G. O'Kelly, Principal. 

John W. Woody, Business Agent. 

Mrs. M. E. Harris, Matron. 
Mrs. O. P. Atkins, Miss Lillian L. Pullian, 

Miss Eliza B. Hand, F. M. Kennedy, 

P. J. Williams, John C. Williamson, 

Miss Flora E. Haislip. 



37 



FOURTH-YEAR PUPILS. 
School Year, September 28, 1904, to May 3, 1905. 



Names of Pupils. 



Paul A. Biggers — 
John H. Pannell — 

John Pringle 

Joseph H. Reynolds 

Annie M. Ash 

Nettie Blackburn -- 
Mattie B. Hairston 

Minnie Hunt 

Sallie Lewis 

Esther Smith 

Selina Wright 



23 Oct. 
19 Oct. 
18 Sept. 

24 Oct. 



Sept. 
Oct. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 



q£ 


If 


133V 2 





128 


4 


153% 


45 


137 





153 





126 


4 


13iy 2 


5 


110 


6 


144 


1 


151 


2 


97 


17 



Gaston. 

Forsyth. 

Forsyth. 

Forsyth. 

Wake. 

Forsyth. 

Forsyth. 

Forsyth. 

Forsyth. 

Wake. 

Forsyth. 



THIRD-YEAR PUPILS. 
School Year, September 28, 1904, to May 3, 1905. 



Russel C. Atkins 

Lizzie Battle 

Helen Bethel 

M. Q. Cele 

Roberta Carr 

James T. Diggs 

Jessie Diggs 

Emma Hanes 

Blanche Holderness 

Annie Houser 

Allie Houser 

Maggie Jarratt 

Hugh R. Mosley — 

Arthur P. Neal 

Minnie Neal 

Maria E. Phifer 

Selina Pyne 



Sept. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Nov. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Oct. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Nov. 
Sept. 
Oct. 
Sept. 
Oct. 



28 


133 


1 


27 


133 


2 


10 


67 


3 


12 


140 


2 


12 


105 


2 


28 


112 


9 


28 


132 


17 


28 


76 


6 


10 


98V 2 


6 


28 


105 


15 


28 


149V 2 


3 


28 


151 





2 


122 


4 


28 


117 


10 


10 


110V2 


12 ! 


28 


146 


1 


12 


138 


5 ! 



Forsyth. 

Craven. 

Forsyth. 

Africa. 

Forsyth. 

Forsyth. 

Forsyth. 

Forsyth. 

Forsyth. 

Forsyth. 

Yadkin. 

Yadkin. 

Rockingham. 

Forsyth. 

Forsyth. 

Lincoln. 

Wayne. 



38 



THIRD-YEAR PUPILS-Continued. 



Names of Pupils. 



W. Cornelius Redd 
Pearl Ray 

Selina Webster 

Ada Willis 















e 




Entered. 


&8 


S-B 






QPh 


HH 


Dee. 


20 


90 


4 


Sept. 


28 


150 





Sept. 


28 


126 


2 


Oct. 


10 


115 


1 



County. 



Forsyth. 
Forsyth. 
Forsyth. 
Forsyth. 



SECOND-YEAR PUPILS. 

School Year, September 28, 1904, to May 3, 1905. 



Alice Allen 

Annie Beck 

Hattie Bell 

Demetria J. Brown - 

Lillian N. Clark 

Fjank T. Finger 

Mary L. Foreman- — 

Berta Foust 

Amos C. Haislip 

Radford C. Hancock 
Joseph H. Hocutt— - 

Lucile Harris 

Mamie Houser 

Viola Hudson 

Joseph Johnson 

Samuel J. Mitchell- 
Vivian C. Ramseur-- 

James Scales 

Leona Tuttle 

Celestia Welch 



Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Jan. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 
19 I Sept. 
21 I Nov. 



Jan. 
Sept. 
Sept. 



16 Oct. 
20 Oct. 



12 20 





27 ] 127 


1 


10 75M> 


27 


12 138V 2 


10 


28 


153 


2 


28 


147 


19 


12 


138 


4 


9 


18 


2 


12 


40 





25 123 


2 


28 155 


2 


28 155 


1 


28 


153 


2 


28 


150 


3 


7 


27 





3 


87M> 


4 


28 


107 





28 118 


6 


12 20 





12 


137 






Forsyth. 

Forsyth. 

Forsyth. 

Buncombe. 

Yadkin. 

Lincoln. 

Wayne. 

Orange. 

Forsyth. 

Virginia. 

Wilson. 

Rowan. 

Yadkin. 

Iredell. 

Lincoln. 

Forsyth. 

Lincoln. 

Rockingham. 

Forsyth. 

Rockingham. 



39 



FIRST-YEAR PUPILS. 
School Year, September 28, 1904, to May 3, 1905. 



Names of Pupils. 



QPm 



Atkins, Harvey 

Ayers, Paul 

Ballard, Belle 

Barnes, Thomas H. — 

Bingham, W. H 

Bridges, Walter 

Boyd, Lou Alice 

Champlain, Lula 

Devault, Carrie 

Diggs, Belle 

Donaldson, Dwight L. 

Eaton, Buna 

Fulp, A. L 

Galloway, Minnie 

Garden, Clifton S. 

Green, Lillie 

Hairston, Malvina 

Harrison, John L. 

Hobson, Carvie 

Hunter, Daisy B. 

Johnson, Garfield 

Jones, Hilton 

Kerr, Edna 

Knotts, James 

Koger, Pattie 

Matthews, Mabel 

McNeely, James P 

Noisette, Belle 

Oaks, Warner 

Pitts, Ethel 

Praleau, Minnie 

Pridgen, Rosetta 

Puett, Ada 



Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Nov. 
Dec. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Dec. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Oct. 
Sept. 
Oct. 
Nov. 
Oct. 
Sept. 
Jan. 
Sept. 
Jan. 
Dec. 
Nov. 
Oct. 
Nov. 
Oct. 
Sept. 
Dec. 
Sept. 
Oct. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Nov. 
Jan. 



153' 2 

92 
153 

72 

85 

103% 
134Y 2 
137% 

5 
144 
132V2 
124 

55 

121% 
110 
128 
149 

42% 
147 



137 

79 

58 
105 
7 
116 
141 
149 
113% 



Forsyth. 

Johnson. 

South Caro- 
lina. 

Wilson. 

Davie. 

Forsyth. 

Forsyth. 

Forsyth. 

Orange. 

Forsyth. 

Mecklenburg. 

Davie. 

Forsyth. 

Forsyth. 

Burke. 

Buncombe. 

Stokes. 

Mecklenburg. 

Maryland. 

Alamance. 

Davie. 

Lincoln. 

Mecklenburg. 

Union. 

Forsyth. 

Forsyth. 

Gaston. 

Mecklenburg. 

Forsyth. 

Guilford. 

Lincoln. 

Columbus. 

Catawba. 



40 



FIRST-YEAR PUPILS— Continued. 



Names of Pupils. 



Entered. 


„! 






q£ 


Sept. 


28 


103 


Sept. 


28 


155 


Oct. 


25 


114 


Oct. 


12 


138 


Sept. 


28 


126 


Sept. 


28 


142% 


Oct. 


12 


137 


Oct. 


12 


142 


Sept. 


28 


145 


Sept. 


28 


64 


Nov. 


2 


130 


Sept. 


28 


115 



County. 



Ramseur, Thomas A. -- 
Ray, Ida 

Reynolds, Roberta 

Russel, Carrie 

Shepherd, Sarah 

Spease, Ella 

Stultz, Thomas 

Tucker, Bessie 

Walton, Cora 

Ware, George K 

Williamson, Henrietta 
Winchester, Bertha 



Lincoln. 

Forsyth. 

Forsyth. 

Buncombe. 

Forsyth. 

Yadkin. 

Forsyth. 

Buncombe. 

Mecklenburg. 

Virginia. 

Wilson. 

Forsyth. 



NIGHT-SCHOOL PUPILS. 

Age. Count ij. 

David Finley 1G South Carolina. 

Willie Johnson 17 Davie. 

Charles Mataw 18 Virginia. 

Georgia Bogan 18 Mecklenburg. 

Bessie Collett 16 Burke. 

Lucy Mason 17 Wake. 

Sallie Mosley 18 Rockingham. 

Eliza Williamson .' 20 Mecklenburg. 



SPECIAL PUPILS. 



Vella Lesueur 

Gwendoline Lesueur 



21 Rockingham. 
19 Rockingham. 



SUMMARY OF ENROLLMENT. 

Enrolled in Normal School 105 

Enrolled in Primary School 206 

In industries and shops 30 



Total 341 



41 



SOCIETIES. 



The Eureka Literary Society for young men and the Garrett Lit- 
eary Society for young women have regular meetings. There arc 
Iso a Young Men's Christian Association, a Young Women's Temper- 
He Union and a Christian Endeavor Society, which hold regular 
leetings and are helpful organizations in the promotion of good 
lorals. 



EQUIPMENT. 



The Slater School has considerable equipment for industrial wor! 
loking, sewing, farming and other industries are taught. 



EXPENSES, 



Board (payable in advance), per month. . . :$0.00 

Washing 7:> 

Fuel 7.1 

Incidental fee for the school year l.oo 

All students must furnish their own lights. 

All students must bring their own bedding, including quilts, blank- 
's, sheets and pillow-cases. 

All studeuts must pay at least one month's expenses lief ore they 
an be enrolled. 
Students must pay for any damage to furniture or buildings result 
g from carelessness or violence. 



OTHER INFORMATION. 



Information not contained in this catalogue will be cheerfully fui 
shed by the Principal. C. G. O'Kelly, Winston. N. C. 



40 



FIRST-YEAR PUPILS— Continued. 



Names of Pupils. 



Ramseur, Thomas A. ■ 21 



Ray, Ida 

Reynolds, Roberta 

Russel, Carrie 

Shepherd, Sarah 

Spease, Ella 

Stultz, Thomas 

Tucker, Bessie 

Walton, Cora 

Ware, George K 

Williamson, Henrietta - 
Winchester, Bertha 



Sept. 
Sept. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Nov. 
Sept. 



155 
114 
138 
126 

142 y 2 

137 
142 
145 
64 
130 
115 



County. 



Lincoln. 

Forsyth. 

Forsyth. 

Buncombe. 

Forsyth. 

Yadkin. 

Forsyth. 

Buncombe. 

Mecklenburg. 

Virginia. 
, Wilson. 
! Forsyth. 



NIGHT-SCHOOL PUPILS. 

Age. 

David Finley 16 

Willie Johnson 17 



Charles Mataw . . 
Georgia Bogan . . . 
Bessie Collett 

Lucy Mason 

Sallie Mosley . . . 
Eliza Williamson 



County. 
South Carolina 
Davie. 

Virginia. 

Mecklenburg. 

Burke. 

Wake. 

Rockingham. 

Mecklenburg. 



SPECIAL PUPILS. 



Vella Lesueur 

Gwendoline Lesueljr 



21 Rockingham. 
19 Rockingham. 



SUMMARY OF ENROLLMENT. 

Enrolled in Normal School 105 

Enrolled in Primary School 206 

In industries and shops 30 



Total 341 



41 



SOCIETIES. 



Tlie Eureka Literary Society for young men and the Garrett Lit- 
erary Society for young women have regular meetings. There are 
also a Young Men's Christian Association, a Young Women's Temper- 
ance Union and a Christian Endeavor Society, which hold regular 
meetings and are helpful organizations in the promotion of good 
morals. 



EQUIPMENT. 



The Slater School has considerable equipment for industrial wor 
Cooking, sewing, farming and other industries are taught. 



EXPENSES, 



Board (payable in advance), per month. . . .$6.00 

Washing 75 

Fuel 75 

Incidental fee for the school year 1.00 

All students must furnish their own lights. 

All students must bring their own bedding, including quilts, blank- 
ets, sheets and pillow-cases. 

All students must pay at least one month's expenses before they 
fan be enrolled. 

Students must pay for any damage to furniture or buildings result 
ing from carelessness or violence. 



OTHER INFORMATION. 



Information not contained in this catalogue will be cheerfully fui 
nished by the Principal. C. G. O'Kelly. Winston. N. C. 




SECOND ANNUAL CATALOGUE 



NORTH CAROLINA 



State Colored Normal Schools 



1905-'06 



ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR 1906-'07 




WINSTON-SALEM, FAYETTEVILLE, ELIZABETH CITY 



The people have a right to the privilege of education, and 

IT IS THE DUTY OF THE STATE TO GUARD AND MAINTAIN 

that right." — Constitution of North Carolina. 



PROPERTY OWNED BY COLORED PEOPLE. 



The report of the State Auditor of North Carolina for the year 
1903 gives the following facts about the value of property in North 
Carolina : 
Assessed value of all taxable property, $433,687,809.50. 

White property $332,978,471.00, or 76.8 per cent. 

Colored property 14,852,811.00, or 3.4 per cent. 

Railroads, etc 85,856,527.00, or 19.8 per cent. 

Listed white polls 201,276, or 73.7 per cent, of all polls. 

Listed colored polls 71,830, or 26.3 per cent. x>f an polls. 

POPULATION, 1870-1900. 





1870. 


1880. 


1890. 1900. 


Total population 


1,071,361 

687,470 

392,891 

63.33 

36.67 


1,399,750 


1,617,947 1,893,810 


Colored 

Percentage total population, white 

Percentage total population, colored 


532,508 [ 562,565 . 630,207 
61.96 j 65.23 66.7 
38.04 34.77 33.3 









SECOND ANNUAL CATALOGUE 



NORTH CAROLINA 



State Colored Normal Schools 



1905-'06 



ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR 1906- '07 



WINSTON-SALEM, FAYETTEVILLE, ELIZABETH CITY 



RALEIGH : 

E. M. Uzzell & Co., State Printers and Binders. 

1906. 



FACTS ABOUT COLORED PUBLIC SCHOOLS, 1904-'05. 



Colored school population 

School enrollment 

Average daily attendance 

Percentage of enrollment in daily attendance 
Percentage of school population enrolled 



Average number of children enrolled with each 

teacher. 
Teachers employed 




Percentage of teachers women 

School term in days 

Average monthly salary of teachers :$ 

Average annual amount paid each teacher $ 

Salary per school day $ 

Salary per week while employed $ 

Salary per week (52 weeks) $ 

Total amount paid teachers ■$214,951.91 

Total amount spent for buildings 1$ 17,825.64 

Total expenditures for colored schools — [$232,777-55 

Percentage of total expenditures spent for colored | 16.3 

schools. 
Percentage of total school population colored 

Spent for each child enrolled i$ 

Spent for each child in daily attendance 1$ 

Number of schools < 

Schools having only one teacher - 

Schools having two or more teachers 

Average area covered by each rural school 1- 

School-houses i 

Log houses 

Value of school property ;$273, 368-00 

Average value of each house $ 124.37 



STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION. 



R. B. Glenn, Governor, President. 

J. Y. Joyner, Superintendent Public Instruction. Secretary. 

F. D. Winston, Lieutenant-Governor. 

J. Bryan Grimes, Secretary of State. 

B. R. Lacy, Treasurer. 

R. D. Gilmer, Attorney-General. 

B. F. Dixon, Auditor. 

Charles L. Coon, Superintendent of Normals. 



By authority of laws enacted by the Legislatures of 1903 and 1905, 
the general control and management of the State Colored Normal 
Schools is vested in the above board. 



INCREASE IN PROPERTY VALUES BY RACES, 1891-1904. 



Year. 


Total Assessed 
Value of all 
Property. 


Railroads, 

Telegraph, 

etc. 


White 
Property. 


Colored 
Property. 




$ 262,796,816 
$ 342,222,009 
$ 79,425,193 

30.2 
$ 442,418,677 
$ 100,196,668 

29.2 
$ 433,687,809 
$ 8, 730, 868 
2.0 


$ 16, 688, 802 
$ 58,780,200 
$ 42,111,398 

252.6 
S 87,022,746 
$ 28,242,546 

48.0 
$ 85,856,527 
$ 1,166,219 
1.3 


$ 234, 109, 568 
$ 271,981,493 
$ 37,871,925 

16.1 
$ 339,969,769 
$ 67,988,276 

24.9 
$ 332,978,471 
$ 6,991,298 
2.1 








Increase ten years 

Percentage increase ten 
years. 


$ 3,441,870 

42.9 
$ 15, 426, 162 


Increase three years 

Percentage increase 

three years. 
1903 

Increase one year 

Percentage increase one 
year. 


$ 3,965,846 
34.6 

$ 14,852.811 
$ 573, 351 
3.8 



The above figures are taken from the reports of the State Auditor 
of North Carolina. The figures show that the assessed value of 
colored property is increasing at a more rapid rate than the rate of 
increase for all other property except railroads and other corporation 
property. 



RECORD OF PROGRESS 1905-06. 



During the school year 1905-'06 the Slater School Board at Winston- 
Salem conveyed to the State Board of Education its property, con- 
sisting of about sixteen acres of land, together with the school build- 
ings and equipment, which have cost about $40,000. The State Board 
! assumes a debt of $12,000 on this property. But the property is easily 
worth $25,000. This means that a gift of at least $12,000 has been 
made to the State by citizens of Winston-Salem and elsewhere, who 
owned this property. 

During the year twenty-six acres of land near Fayetteville have 
been purchased for a school site, at a cost of $1,500. The colored 
people and their white friends in that vicinity have contributed 
$529.84 of this amount ; $500 has been paid out of the Colored Normal 
School annual appropriation, and the remainder has been advanced 
through the liberality of Messrs. E. E. Smith and T. W. Thurston, the 
first-named being the principal of the Fayetteville Normal School and 
the other the superintendent of the Ashley-Bailey Silk Mill. Both 
are colored men deeply interested in the success of the work at Fay- 
etteville. 

At Elizabeth City eighteen acres of land have been bought during 
the year, at a cost of $2,000. Of this amount $1,652.43 has been con- 
tributed by the colored people of that section of the State, aided by 
their white friends in that vicinity and elsewhere. Some years ago 
a gift of five acres of land for a school site at Elizabeth City was 
made by a friend of the work at that place. The eighteen acres pur- 
chased this year adjoins this five acres, making a site of twenty-three 
acres in all. 

During the year, therefore, it will be seen that $15,500 has been 
added to the permanent equipment of these three colored normal 
schools, less than $1,000 of which has been expended out of the annual 
appropriation of State funds. This means that the State has been 
given nearly $15,000 during the year to aid in helping along the work 
of training teachers for the colored public schools. 

In addition to what is said above, it should be remembered that 
about $5,000 in good pledges remains to be collected at Fayetteville 
and Elizabeth City. This sum will be available as soon as building 
work is begun at these places. Many colored people at both these 
places have also expressed a willingness to aid by means of labor as 
soon as the State can see its way clear to undertake such operations. 

But this is not all the progress that has been made. The teachers 
and pupils of these schools are more in earnest than ever. They are 
doing better work than ever before. The average attendance is bet- 



ter, the principals have had less trouble with discipline, and the citi- 
zens, both white and black, are taking more interest in the work than 
ever before. The work of each school in detail can be seen from the 
matter contained in this catalogue. I regret that space does not per- 
mit printing more complete and detailed accounts of what is being 
done. But enough is given to convince any fair-minded person that 
these schools are worth the State's attention and care. An extra 
appropriation from the State equal in amount to what has been given 
by the local communities would enable us to put these schools into 
permanent homes of their own, thus greatly increasing their useful- 
ness and efficiency. Charles L. Coon. 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 



TUITION. 

Tuition in all the normal schools is free to those who intend to teach 
in the colored public schools of North Carolina. Those who do not 
intend to teach must pay $10 a year tuition. These schools are main- 
tained for the purpose of training teachers for the elementary public 
schools. It is only just and right that those who take advantage of 
these schools, and who do not intend to teach, shall pay the tuition 
charges. 

PURPOSE. 

The Colored State Normal Schools at Winston-Salem, Fayetteville 
and Elizabeth City are maintained by the State for the purpose of 
training teachers for tbe colored elementary public schools of North 
Carolina. The school at Winston-Salem was established in 1895 ; tbe 
school a-t Elizabeth City in 1891, and the school at Fayetteville in 1877. 

REGULATIONS. 

The following general regulations apply to all the normal schools : 

1. Pupils of both sexes are to be admitted, but all boarding pupils 
must consult the local principal before making any arrangements for 
boarding outside the school dormitories. 

2. Only pupils of good moral character will be admitted or retained 
in the schools. 

3. So pupil will be admitted to any of the schools after the opening 
toeek, except upon examination, which examination will corer the 
previous work of the class to which admission is sought. All such 
examinations and their result must be approved by the superintendent 

4. No pupil will be advanced to a higher class except upon the satis- 
factory completion of the work of the preceding class. All tests and 
examination questions shall be first approved by the superintendent, 
and no promotion to a higher class shall be valid except approved by 
the superintendent. 

5. The school year shall consist of eight months of twenty school 
days each. No holidays except Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and 
New Year's Day shall be given. A Christnfas recess not exceeding 
ten days may be given, but such recess shall not be included in the 
school year of 160 days. 

6. Three uncxcused absences or tardies during the year shall cause 
any pupil to be suspended from school for the remainder of the year. 
No principal shall accept any excuse for tardiness or absence except 
the serious sickness of the' pupil or his immediate family. The super- 
intendent shall have the power to define the terms absence and tardi- 
ness. 



8 



7. No substitute teacher shall be employed, except upon the ap- 
proval of the superintendent, and no student shall be permitted to 
teach any normal class. 

S. All students who receive free tuition shall sign a pledge to teat h 
two years in the colored public schools of the State. 

9. The satisfactory completion of the work of the fourth grade of 
the elementary school as set forth in the State Course of Study will 
be required for entrance ou the work of the normal course of study. 

BEGINNING OF SESSION 1906-'07. 

The session of 190<J-'07 will begin at Fayetteville, September 17. 
1906; at Elizabeth City. September 17, 1906, and at Winston-Salem. 
October 1. 1906. 



COURSES OF STUDY. 



The following courses of study are offered in all the normal schools, 
subject to present limitations as to equipment. The normal school 
begins with fifth-grade work, the high school with ninth-grade work, 
and the primary school with first-grade work. 

NORMAL ELEMENTARY COURSE. 

fie st teak. 

1. Reading • 

a. Phonics (spelling, writing, diacritical marks) : Harrington's 
Spelling Book, Part II, pp. 1-4S. including the words found in the 
reading and other subjects of study. 

&. Longfellow's Song of Hiawatha, Francillon's Gods and Heroes, 
Ruskin's King of the Golden River, Hawthorne's The Great Stone 
Face. 

2. Language: 

a. The Story (oral and written). 

~b. Copying and dictation by sentences and paragraphs. The copy- 
ing and dictation must not take the sentence out of its place in the 
paragraph. The relation of sentence and paragraph must be retained 
in all the work.- Use the readers as the basis of the work. 

c. Hyde's Lessons I, pp. 1-158, for formal work, omitting all com- 
position and picture lessons. 

3. Drawing : 

a. Use Normal Drawing 1. The pupils are not simply to draw lines, 
but learn to draw real things, using lines. 

&. Book 2 should be taken up after Book 1 has been completed. 

4. Arithmetic : 

a. Review notation and numeration ; formal addition, subtraction, 
multiplication, and division of whole numbers and fractions, and 
take up : 

6. Decimals, compound quantities and percentage, using Colaw and 
Ellwood's Primary, pp. 228 to end. Teachers should own Werner 
Arithmetic 2. 

5. History : 

o. Read Hansen's Primary History to get a general view of the 
subject. 

6. Study — Colonies. The teacher will take up the study of the Colo- 
nies after plan of Guerber's Story of the Thirteen Colonies, 
o 



10 



G. Geography : 

a. Home Geography. Teachers will follow plan of Tarr and Mc- 
Murry's Geography 1. 

b. Pupils must study the life histories of a number of common 
plants and animals by means of the school garden. 

c. Use Maury's Elementary Geography to give pupils an idea of the 
world as a whole. Teachers should own Tarr and MeMurry's Geog- 
raphy 1. 

7. Science : 

Agriculture, Cooking, Sewing. 

second year. 

1. Reading : 

a. Phonics (spelling, writing) : Harrington, Part 2, pp. 49-92 : words 
from other subjects. 

b. Clarke's Story of Troy, Guerber's Story of the Greeks, Warren's 
Stories from English History. 

2. Language : 

a. Story (oral and written) ; copying and dictation. 

b. Hyde's Lessons 1, pp. 159-206, omitting all picture and composi- 
tion 



3. Drawing: 

a. See first year. 

b. Use Book 3 after 1 and 2 have been completed. 

4. Arithmetic : 

Take up no new subjects. Use Colaw and Ellwood's Advanced 
Arithmetic to strengthen and extend work already done, omitting all 
reviews and supplementary exercises. 

5. History : 

a. Study Revolution, using biographies of Washington, Adams (Sam- 
uel), Franklin, Henry. 

b. Read Hansen's Higher on Revolution. 
Teachers should own Fiske's War for Independence. 

6. Geography : 

Study North America, using plan of Tarr and MeMurry's Geogra- 
phy 2 ; Maury's Manual to end of North America, with North Carolina 
Geography. 

7. Science : 

Elementary Agriculture, Physiology, Cooking. Sewing. 



11 



third year. 

1. Reading : 

a. Phonics (spelling and- writing) ; review Harrington; words from 
other subjects. 

&. Poems of Knightly Adventure, Irving's Knickerbocker Stories, 
Guerber's Story of tbe Romans ; Selections, Whittier, Holmes. 

2. Language : 

a. The Story (oral and written) ; copying and dictation. 
1). Buehler's English Grammar begun; study Parts 2 and 3, and then 
Part 1. 

3. Drawing : 

o. See first year. 

1). Use Book 4 after 1. 2 and 3 have been completed. 

4. Arithmetic : 

See second-year work. Review of subject-. 

5. Geography : 

Study Europe and the other continents after plan of Tarr and.Me- 
Murry's Geography 3 ; Maury's Manual from end of North America to 
end of book. 

6. History : 

a. Read Hansen's Higher, from Revolution to end of book. 
1). The Nation : Use biographies of Jefferson, Boone, Fulton, Whit- 
ney, Morse, Lincoln, Lee. 

c. Civil Government should be studied in connection with history. 

7. Science : 

Agriculture, Cooking and Sewing, Physiology. 

fourth year. 
1. Reading : 

a. Phonics and complete review of spelling, with instruction how to 
teach children to read, spell and write. 

&. Holbrook's Hiawatha Primer, Claxton's Grimm's Fairy Stories, 
Baldwin's Fairy Stories and Fables, McMurry's Robinson Crusoe, 
Moulton's Bible Stories, Cook's Story of Ulysses, Pratt's Legends of 
the Red Children. 

The object of reading the above books here is to make students 
thoroughly familiar with their contents and with the methods of 
teaching and using the books in the primary grades 1-4. 



12 



2. Language : 

a. Buehler's English Grammar completed. 

b. Ural and written language work, based on the reading of this 
year, with methods of teaching language grades 1-4. 

3. Drawing: 

a. Rook 5, Normal Drawing. 

b. Review of Rooks 1-4, and instruction in how to teach drawing, 
grades 1-4. 

4. Arithmetic : 

a. Werner Arithmetic 3. This book contains work in elementary 
algebra and concrete geometry, as well as in higher arithmetic. 

b. Review of the subjects of notation and numeration ; addition, 
subtraction, multiplication and division of whole numbers and frac- 
tions ; simple decimals, simple compound quantities, simple percent- 
age, and how to teach these subjects, grades 1-5. 

5. History : 

a. Read Myers' General History. 

b. North Carolina History and review of the subject of history as 
contained in this course. 

6. Geography : 

a. Review of subject as studied in this course. 

b. Geography, grades 1-4, and how to teach it. 

7. Science : 

Agriculture, Cooking and Sewing, Physiology. 

OUTLINE OF NORMAL HIGH SCHOOL COURSE. 

First Year — I. English — 

a. Literature (reading), 3. 

b. Grammar and composition, 2. 

c. Spelling and phonetics, 2. 

II. Mathematics — 

a. Arithmetic, 2. 

b. Algebra, 3. 

III. General History, 3. 
IY. Physiology, 2. 

V. Physical Geography, 3. 
VI. Drawing, 2. 



13 

VII. Agriculture, 3. 

VIII. Domestic Science, 2. 

The Arabic figures mean the number of recitations a week. The 
recitation periods for agriculture and domestic science are to be each 
60 minutes in length ; for the other subjects, 45 minutes each. 

Second Year — I. English — 

a. Literature (reading). 3. 

b. Grammar and composition, 2. 

c. Spelling and phonetics, 2. 

II. Mathematics — Algebra, 3. 

III. General History, 3. 

IV. Botany, 4. 
V. Drawing, 2. 

VI. Agriculture, 3. 

VII. Domestic Science, 2. 

The recitation periods for agriculture and domestic science are to 
be 60 minutes for each ; for the other subjects, 45 minutes each. 

Third Year— I. English— 

a. Literature (reading), 3. 

b. Grammar and composition, 2. 

c. Spelling, etc., 2. 

II. Mathematics — Geometry, 3. 

III. English History, 3. 

IV. Drawing, 2. 

V. Agriculture, 3. 

' VI. Domestic Science, 2. 

VII. Teaching (theory and practice), 5. 

The recitation periods for agriculture and domestic science are to 
be 60 minutes each ; for the other subjects, 45 minutes each. 

Fourth Year— I. English— 

a. Literature (reading), 3. 

b. Grammar and composition, 2. 

c. Spelling, etc., 2. 

II. Mathematics — 

a. Geometry, 2. 

b. Arithmetic, 1. 



14 

III. History— 

a. United States History, 3. 
1). Civics, 2. 

IV. Drawing, 2. 
V. Agriculture, 3. 

VI. Domestic Science, 2. 

VII. Teaching (theory and practice), 3. 

The recitation periods for agriculture and domestic science are to 
be 60 minutes each ; for the other subjects, 45 minutes each. 

PRIMARY SCHOOL COURSE. 

It is sometimes necessary, on account of the poor preparation of 
those who apply for entrance to the classes of the normal schools, to 
have a good primary school in connection with each normal. It is 
also necessary to have such a school in which candidates for gradua- 
tion from the normal schools can be required to teach successfully 
prior to graduation. 

fikst year. 

1. Reading : 

a. Phonics — spelling and writing. 

b. Holmes' First Reader (third month), Holbrook's Hiawatha 
Primer (Geography), Claxton's Grimm's Fairy Stories (History). 

2. Language : 

a. The Story (oral only). 

b. Copying by sentences and paragraphs. 

c. Dictation by sentences and paragraphs. 

Teachers should use the readers for this work. The copying and 
dictation must not take the sentence out of its place in the paragraph. 
The relation of sentence and paragraph must always be retained. 

3. Drawing : 

a. Permit and encourage children to draw live objects such as they 
desire. 

b. Let the writing be introduced by means of drawing. 

c. Vae Book 1, Normal Drawing. 

4. Arithmetic : See second year. 

5. History : See Reading. 



6. Geography : 

a. See Reading. 

b. Let the children have a garden and by that means study the life 
histories of at least four common plants. Let the location determine 
what plants are to be studied. Plants that furnish food, clothing or 
shelter will be most interesting to children. The life histories of some 
animals should also be studied. The moth, the butterfly, the 'toad and 
any animals which furnish food or clothing will be interesting. 

second tear. 

1. Reading : 

a. Phonics — spelling and writing; Harrington, Part 1, pp. 20-40; 
also words from other subjects. 

6. Holmes' Second Reader, Baldwin's Fairy Stories and Fables 
(History), MeMurry's Robinson Crusoe (Geography). 

2. Language : See first year. 

3. Drawing : See first year. 

4. Arithmetic : 

a. Counting 1-100, using real things. 
&. Notation and numeration, 1-1000. 

c. The thirty-six addition facts. 

The teacher should use Colaw and Ellwood's Primary Arithmetic, 
pp. 1-109, omitting pp. 66-76 and pp. 1-6. 

5. History : See Reading. 

6. Geography : 

a. Let the children have a garden. See first year. 

6. Children learn direction and get ideas of distance, form, color. 
See Drawing Work. 

c. Weather Chart : Cause of wind, rain, frost, dew, change of sea- 
sons, should be learned and discussed in connection with the weather 
chart. 

third year. 

1. Reading : 

a. Phonics — spelling and writing; Part 1, Harrington, pp. 40-7S ; 
also words from other subjects. 

1). Holmes' Third Reader, Cook's Story of Ulysses, Moulton's Bible 
Stories (History). 

2. Language : 

a. The Story (oral and written). 
* ft. Copying and dictation. See first year. 



10 



c. Teachers should do formal work. Hyde's Lessons 1, pp. 1-70. 
omitting all picture and composition lessons. Children must not have 
the book. 

3. Drawing : See first year. 

4. Arithmetic: 

a. Formal addition, subtraction, multiplication and division. 

b. Colaw and Ellwood's Primary, pp. 109-203. Children may have 
the book for first time. Teachers should own Werner Arithmetic 1. 

5. History : , 
Bible Stories. (See Reading). 

6. Geography: 

a. Home Geography — local soil, land and water forms ; roads, rail- 
roads, trade and manufacturing.; relation of plants and animals to 
soil ; life histories of some common plants and animals. See first 
year. 

b. Teach children to draw to a scale the school-house and grounds; 
the township and county, locating the roads, the railroads, the post- 
offices and their own dwellings. 

fourth year, 

1. Reading : 

a. Phonics — spelling and writing, diacritical marks ; Harrington. 
Part 1, pp. 20-78, in review; also words from other subjects. 

&. Holmes' Fourth Reader, Francillon's Gods and Heroes. Moulton's 
Bible Stories (New Testament). 

2. Language : 

a. The Story (oral and written) ; copying and dictation. See first 
year. 

b. Hyde's Language Lessons 1, pp. 1-70, omitting all picture and 
composition lessons. Children may have language book in their hands 
for the first time. 

3. Drawing : 

a. See first-year work. 

b. Use Book 2 after Book 1 has been completed. 

4. Arithmetic : 

a. Review previous work and teach common fractions. 

b. Colaw and Ellwood's Primary, pp. 209-227. Add many practical 
examples. Teachers should own Werner Arithmetic 1. 



17 

5. History : 

«. Bible Stories. (See Reading). 

&. Exploration and Discovery : Use stories of Columbus, Cortez, De 
Soto ; Cabot, Drake, Raleigb ; Carrier, Cbamplain, La Salle ; Hudson. 
Teacbers and pupils will find Shaw's Discoveries and Explorers, 
Eggleston's Great Americans, and Montgomery's Beginners' American 
History helpful books. 

6. Geography : 

a. Use Home Geography in Tarr and McMurry's Geography 1. 

&. Continue to study life histories of some common plants and ani- 
mals by means of the school garden. 

c. Begin to study Maury's Elementary latter part of year. 

Teachers should use Tarr and McMurry's Geography 1 for supple- 
mentary work. 

The Primary School will be in charge of a supervising teacher, 
working under the superintendent and the local principal. The regu- 
lar normal teachers and the fourth-year normal pupils will assist in 
the teaching. The daily programmes will be made by the superin- 
tendent to meet local needs and conditions. 



ELIZABETH CITY 



COLORED NORMAL SCHOOL 



l905-'06 



(FIFTEENTH year) 



THE SESSION OF l906-'07 BEGINS SEPTEMBER 17, 1906 



LOCAL BOARD OF MANACERS: 

E. F. Lamb, President, J. B. Leigh, Treasurer, 

S. L. Sheep, Secretary, W. G. Gaither, 

R. W. Askew. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE: 

E. F. Lamb, S. L. Sheep, 

J. B. Leigh. 



TEACHERS: 

P. W. Moore, Principal. 
John T. Doles, Sara H. Edwards, 

John H. Bias, Fannie O. Butler, 

Matilda A. Enos, Bessie E. George. 



SOCIETIES. 



Prayer-meeting. — The Wednesday after-school prayer-meeting is so 
conducted that it is a source of religious and spiritual help to the life 
of the students and teachers. The meeting is regularly conducted by 
Rev. J. T. Doles. Occasionally the colored and the white ministers 
of the city lead the meeting. 

Christian Associations. — The Young Men's and Women's Christian 
Associations are greatly instrumental in toning up and deepening the 
moral and religious life and activity of the student-body. 

Lyceum. — The Lyceum is a literary society officered by the students, 
but under the supervision of the teachers. It affords the students an 
opportunity to become acquainted with parliamentary usages and to 
have practice in public speaking and discussion. This society meets 
weekly and renders an occasional public program. 

OTHER INFORMATION. 

The expenses for board and washing per calendar month are $7 for 
young men and .$6 for young women. Young women who come as 
self-boarding students will be required to pay for room rent and fuel 
only $1.75 per calendar month. Bring towels, combs and brushes for 
individual use. 

Students must make good all damage done to furniture or buildings 
resulting from carelessness. 

Any other information not contained in this catalogue the principal 
will be glad to give. Address P. W. Moore, Principal, State Normal 
School, Elizabeth City, North Carolina. 



PAID CONTRIBUTIONS TO BUILDING FUND 1905-'06 



The following amounts have been paid to Mr. J. B. Leigh, Treas- 
urer, from May, 1905, to May, 1906, for the purpose of buying a site 
and erecting a building for the Colored Normal School at Elizabeth 
City : 

CONTRIBUTIONS BY WHITE FRIENDS. 

Elizabeth City— Dr. O. McMullan, .$33; A. B. Seeley & Son, $25; 
O. E. Gilbert, .$75; J. H. LeRoy, $50; McCabe & Grice, $50; M. N. 
Sawyer, $50 ; P. W. Melick Co., $50 ; I. M. Meekins. $50 ; N. K. Barker, 
$10; J. C. Brooks, $25; Dr. L. S. Blades, $50; O. J. Woodley, $50; 
J. D. Hathaway. $5; H. H. Lavenstein, $5; M. L. Sanderlin, $25; 
Rucker & Sheeley, $25 ; George R. Bright, $25 ; Owens Shoe Co., $25 ; 
Fred. Davis. $10; J. P. Overman, $5; Dr. A. L. Pendleton, $10; S. M. 
Rallinson, $5 ; W. H. Jennings, .$5 ; J. C. Spence, $5 ; J. Haywood Saw- 
yer, $25 ; G. M. Scott, $5 ; H. Clay Tunis, $25 ; W. T. Old, $5; Dr. C. W. 
Sawyer, $5 ; Sheriff Charles Reid, $5 ; Pritchard & Jackson, $5 ; Cul- 
pepper, Griffin, Old & Grice Co., $5 ; Mrs. M. E. Fearing, $1 ; D. M. 
Jones, $10. Total, $761. 

Fkom elsewhere— T. Brown Belfield, Philadelphia, Pa., $25 ; J. W. 
Steacy, York, Pa., $250; William I. Bowditch. Boston, Mass., $25; 
P. D. Hamilton. Waterbury, Conn.. $5. ' Total, $305. 

CONTRIBUTIONS BY COLORED PEOPLE. 

Elizabeth City— Dr. G. W. Cardwell, $25 ; T. J. Rayner, $14 ; Miss 
H. A. Mebane, $5; M. D. Spellman, $1.50; John Sutton, $5; David 
Hampton, $2; Rev. J. T. Doles. $25; Prof. J. H. Bias, $10; John 
Taylor. $0.25 ; Washington Perry, $1 ; George T. Jones, $1.25'; State 
Normal School, $97.60; Nathaniel Overton, $1; Mrs. Ida A. Brown, 
$5 ; Mrs. Cornelia Perkins, $0.50 ; Mrs. Priscilla Sawyer, $5 : Miss 
Bessie George, $5 ; Miss C. McMurran, $1 ; Miss C. W. Watson, $0.25 ; 
Prof. P. W. Moore, $25 ; Mrs. F. O. Butler, $20 ; Alfred Bowe. $1.25 ; 
Miss Mary Whitehurst, $0.25 ; Miss O. W. Whitehurst, $1 ; John Brad- 
shaw, $5; John Long, $5; H. Barrington, $1; J. H. Perkins, $0.25; 
P. A. Robinson, $0.25; Cicero White, $0.25; Miss C. W. Whitehurst, 
$2.25 ; J. C. Hollowell, $1 ; Rev. J. H. Wilson, .$5 ; J. W. Barrington, 
$1 ; Miss M. L. Harvey, $1 ; J. E. Brown, .$5 ; C. W. Brown, $5 ; W. E. 
Simpson, $1 ; J. J. McClease, $0.25 ; Mrs. Alice Johnson. .$1 ; Miss L. E. 
Robbins, $1; Rev. L. E. Fairley, $0.50; Mrs. Mary E. Jones, $1; Mrs. 
Annie E. Jones, $5; Mrs. Mary E. Reid, $2; Rev. P. W. Holley, $1; 

Henry Pool, $0.25 ; Allen Simpson, $1 ; Brothers, $0.25 ; W. H. 

Dance, $17; David Overton, $0.25; Mt. Lebanon Church. $20: Noah 
Cartwright, $1 : Hugh Cale, $1 ; A. Brockett. $0.25 ; Daniel Stallings, 



23 

$1 ; Miss Minnie Sawyer, $1 ; Rev. George W. Williams, $1 ; A. Pendle, 
$0.25 ; W. R. Lane, $0.50 ; Rev. H. M. Maloy, $0.25 ; Miss L. M. Brown, 
$0.25; D. W. Perkins, $0.40; S. F. Sutton, $0.30; — Harris, $0.25; 
George Midgett, $0.50 ; L. D. Overton, $0.25 ; Mrs. Martha Riddick, $1 ; 
Mrs. Alice Haugbton, $0.25 ; Olive Branch Church, $7.63 ; Miss A. L. 
Trafton, $2 ; Miss Irene Long, $1 ; Mrs. Lizzie Targinton, $1 ; George 
Bright, $1 ; George Mitchell, $0.50 ; a friend, $0.25 ; Andrew Williams, 
$0.25 ; Moses Brickhouse, $2 ; Miss E. A. Leigh, $1 ; Thomas Whidbee, 
$1; Elisha Overton, $6; Mr. and Mrs. Robert Bowe, $1; J. C. Wil- 
liams, $2 ; Frank Simon, $0.25 ; Jordan Pool, $10. Total, $382.43. 

Edenton— Rev. M. M. Weston, $5; Miss S. F. Gregory, $1; Miss 
E. E. Skinner, $2 ; W. E. Burke, $0.25 ; Rev. C. M. Cartwright, $1 ; 
Rev. M. P. Hawkins, $1 ; Hannibal Badham, $1. Total, $11.25. 

Windsor— W. A. Smallwood, $10; Miss Maggie R. Peterson, $1 ; 
A. C. Thompson, $1; J. J. Hyman, $1.50; H. D. Cooper, $3.50; Miss 
Ella Foreman, $1 ; J. E. Thompson, $3.50; W. A. Cooper, $0.25 ; A. N. 
Cooper, $0.25 ; William Carter, $2 ; Rev. J. A. Robbins, $0.25. Total, 
$24.25. 

South Mills— William A. Griffin, $0.50 ; Miss Addie Taylor, $1 ; 
Isaiah Turner, $1. Total, $2.50. 

Roper— Miss H. A. Haugbton, $1 ; J. H. Rowson, $1. Total, $2. 

Colerain— David Cherry, $5 ; Miss S. C. Cherry, $0.50 ; Miss G. O. 
Jenkins, $5 ; Miss Rachel Cherry, $0.50. Total, $11. 

Plymouth— Arthur X. Sutton, $1 ; Rev. A. G. Armstead, $1. 
Total, $2. 

New Bern— Jaines H. Moore, $1 ; W. K. Moore, $1. Total, $2. 

Washington — Miss Annie Bonner, $0.50. 

Weeksville — Miss Bessie A. Smith, $1 ; B. C. Johnson, $0.50 ; Law- 
rence White, $5. Total, $6.50. 

Winfall— Miss L. A. Daugbtry, $4 ; Miss E. E. Felton, $5 ; Mr. and 
Mrs. J. E. Felton. $5. Total, $14. 

Pleasant Hell— James Blount, $1 ; Abner Blount, $2. Total, $3. 

Shiloh— Cuffy Williams, $5; William Williams, $0.50. Total, 
$5.50. 

Motock— Miss Ida Bormard, $1 ; Miss Willie Holloman, $0.25 ; Miss 
A. O. Wilson, $5 ; Miss Mary E. Wilson, $5 ; Mrs. Corprew, $2. Total, 
$13.25. 

Kinston — Miss Cora Cogdell, $0.25 ; Robert Kornegay, $5. Total, 
$5.25. 

Snowden— Apollos Dey, $1 ; E. Snowden. $1 ; W. H. Baxter, $0.50. 
Total, $2.50. 

Belvedere — Rev. Robert Brinn, $1 : Miss Alice L. Brinn, $0.75. 
Total, $1.75. 

Ahoskie— Mrs. J. S. Sills, $0.25 ; a friend, $0.25. Total, $0.50. 

Garysburg — Miss K. L. Porch, $1. 

Fairfield — Mrs. George Simpson, $0.50. 

Tulls — Miss Mamie Ashby, $3. 



24 



Ultare — Miss J. A. James. .$1. 

Scotland Neck — Miss M. Dickens, $1. 

Highlands — Joseph E. Brown, .$1. 

Jackson — Miss Idel M. Harris, $0.25. 

Hertford — Alex. Jones, $0.50. 

Seaboard — Mrs. Young, .$0.25. 

Hyde County— Miss Mary E. Willie, $1. 

Hobbsville — Miss Elnora Hurdle, .$1. 

Durant's Neck— J. II. Gordon, $0.50; Miss Mary E. Sumner, $10. 

Powellsville Sessoms, $0.50. 

Harrellsville — Miss Maude Askew, $0.25 ; Miss Mary X. Bev- 
erly, $1. 

Columbia— S. W. Hill, $2. 

Ryland — Rev. E. D. Nowell, $0.50. 

Elmville — Miss Rosia Tomer, $0.75. 

Cremo — Miss Malinda Cherry, $1. 

Margarettsvtlle — Miss R. A. Calvert, $5. 

Chapanoke— Ethel L. Williams, $2.50. 

Skyco— W. S. Bowser, $1. 

Jamesvllle — Robert A. Staten, $5. 

Manteo — Rev. Daniel Hopkins, $1. 

Williamston— Miss L. C. Griffin, $0.25. 

Belcross— C. M. Walker, $3. 

Total for North Carolina outside Elizabeth City, $155. 

From elsewhere— Prof. E. C. Cooper, Newark, N. J., $30; Gold Wil- 
son, Renoville, Va., $0.75 ; Miss S. A. Williams, Gilinerton. Va.. $1 : 
Miss Isabella Hollowell, Maiden, Mass., $5 ; Mrs. A. Harrell, Norfolk. 
Va.. $1; Miss M. E. Coleman, Quillin, Va., $0.25; J. Brinkley, Quillin. 
Va., $5 ; Sarah F. Christian. Renoville. Va.. $1 ; Miss M. A. Enos, 
New York, $5. Total, $49. 

SUMMARY OF PAID CONTRIBUTIONS TO MAY, 1906. 

By white citizens of Elizabeth City $ 761.00 

By white citizens elsewhere 305.00 

By colored people of Elizabeth City 3S2..43 

By colored people of North Carolina outside of Elizabeth City. 155.00 

By colored people outside North Carolina 49.00 

Total $1,652.43 






25 



RECORD OF PUPILS, 1905-'06. 

OCCUPATION OF PARENTS. 

Boys. 

Total number of pupils 79 

Pupils whose parents are farmers 43 

Pupils whose parents are preachers 5 

Pupils whose parents are merchants 3 

Pupils whose parents are butchers 1 

Pupils whose parents are carpenters , 3 

Pupils whose parents are fishermen ' 

Pupils whose parents are teachers 5 

Pupils whose parents have some other occupation 19 

SELF HELP. 



241 


320 


84 


127 


16 


21 


11 


14 


3 


4 


12 


15 


3 


3 


2 


7 


50 


69 



Pupils whose parents own their own homes 


25 


124 


149 


Percentage whose parents own their own homes 


32.0 


51.4 


46.5 












50 






Pupils whose parents pay all their expenses 


9 











SOME SELF-SUPPORTING STUDENTS 1905-'OS 



1. George T. Jones, born in Lewiston, Bertie County; age, 23; at- 
tended public school eigbt terms; entered State Normal School 1902; 
was janitor, mail-carrier and did other work for school ; during vaca- 
tion worked in furniture store and drug store ; taught two Sunday- 
school classes, sang in choir and paid all his school expenses; father 
dead ; graduated 1906. 

2. Moses Collins, born, 1882, in Washington County : attended public 
school eight terms; worked on farm; attended State Normal School 
five terms ; during vacations worked at saw-mills and on farms ; 
graduated 1906 ; parents dead ; paid all his own expenses. 

' 3. Emily O. Piland. born Gates County, 1880 ; father dead ; worked 
on farm to educate herself; attended public school ten terms; entered 
State Normal School at age IS ; continued working on farm during 
vacations ; graduated 1906. 

4. Clarkie Hinton. born in Pasquotank County, 1886 : worked on 
farm ; attended public school nine terms ; during vacations worked on 
father's farm ; graduated 1906 ; has teacher's certificate. 

5. Willie Person, born in Northampton County twenty-two years 
ago ; works on farm and at saw-mill ; pays own expenses : attended 
public school ten terms ; attended Garysburg High School two terms ; 
entered State Normal School 1905; will graduate 1907; parents living. 

6. Lewis Person, born in Northampton County twenty years ago ; 
works on farm and at saw-mill for support ; attended public school 
eight terms ; attended Garysburg High School two terms ; entered 
State Normal School 1905 ; parents living ; will graduate 1907. 

7. James H. Rowsom, born 1884, in Washington County: attended 
public school eight terms ; works on farm ; pays own schooling ; mother 
dead ; entered State Normal School 1902 ; graduated 1906. 

8. Mary E. Bonner, born 1S84, in Brunswick County, Va. ; moved to 
Northampton County at five years of age ; attended public school in 
Northampton and assisted parents on farm ; entered State Normal 
School 1904 ; will graduate 1907. 

9. Rosia Toorner, born in Chatham County, 1888: father dead; 
mother owns little farm ; works on farm to support family and edu- 
cate herself; left school this spring to begin farming; attended public 
school ; wants to teach to help her race ; entered normal in 1906. 

10. Mamie L. Cheek, born twenty years ago : father owns farm : 
she works on farm: attended public school; entered normal 1906: 
honest and faithful. 

11. Enolia L. Davis of Warren County. 17 years of age : father 
dead ; mother owns home and farm : works on farm ; attended public- 
school ; entered normal 1906. 



GRADUATES AND WHAT THEY DO. 



Name. 


Present Occupation. 


Post-office. 


Emmie C 


Principal 












Elizabeth City, N. C. 




Teacher 

Teacher 

















1897. 



Bazemore-Peel, Nettie J. 

Leigh, Isaac F 

Lewter, Mary E. 

Mebane-Jenkins, Mattie ] 

Parker, William W. 

Perkins, Daniel W 

Rayner, Hannah S 

Reid, Olive B. 

Riddick, Luella E 

Rogers, Alonzo B 

Skinner, Lizzie V 



Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Attorney at Law 

Teacher 

Teacher 



Teacher 
Teacher 



Philadelphia, Pa. 
Edenton, N. C. 
Lewiston, N. C. 
Hertford, N. C. 
Jacksonville, N. C. 
Elizabeth City, N. C. 
Windsor, N. C. 
Hertford, N. C. 
Elizabeth City, N. C. 
Elizabeth City, N. C. 
Elizabeth City, N. C. 



1899. 



Fleming, Lizzie C 

Jenkins, Catherine 

McDonald. Mary E. 

Stallings-Fleming, Carrie E. 

Trafton, Alexena L 

Williams, Isaiah 



Teacher 
Teacher 



Elizabeth City, N. C. 
Gatesville, N. C. 
Elizabeth City, N. C. 
Elizabeth City, N. C. 
Gatesville, N. C. 
Creswell, N. C. 



28 



GRADUATES AND WHAT THEY DO— Continued. 
1900. 



Name. 



Barrington, Herbert 

Bonard, Ida G. M. 

Brinn, Alice L 

Brockett-Butler, Jennie H. 

Burke, Nellie A 

Harrell, Georgiana 

Lewis, James B 

Midgett, Charles M 

Midgett-Dunbar, Ella M. — 

Pierce, James F 

Weeks, Alfred L. E 

Whitfield, George R 



Present Occupation. 



Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Minister and Principal- 
Teacher 



Post-office. 



Elizabeth City, N. C. 
Camden, N. C. 
Belvidere, N. C. 
Elizabeth City, N. C. 
Elizabeth City, N. C. 
Weeksville, N. C. 
Elizabeth City, N. C. 
Elizabeth City, N. C. 
Manteo, N. C. 
Windsor, N. C. 
New Bern, N. C. 



1901. 



Brinkley, Clotee 

Brown, Louise M. - 
Hawkins, Bertha J. 
Hill, Amanda M. — 

Jones, Annie E. 

Rayner, Thomas J. - 
Starke, Lucius C. - 



Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 



Norfolk, Va. 
Elizabeth City, N. C. 
Chapanoke, N. C. 
Columbia, N. C. 
Elizabeth City, N. C. 
Elizabeth City, N. C. 
Elizabeth City, N. C. 



1902. 



Brockett, John H ! Teacher j Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Cooper, Thomas S \ Principal Public School- 1 Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Law, John P. Teacher ' Merry Hill, N. C. 

Little, Carlee M 1 Teacher 1 Edenton, N. C. 

McDougald, Emma L j Teacher j Whiteville, N. C. 

Outlaw, Henry S. 1 Teacher 1 Merry Hill, N. C. 

Sessoms-Turner, Mamie L. Teacher j Elizabeth City, N. C. 



29 



GRADUATES AND WHAT THEY DO-Contjnued. 
1903. 



Name. 


Present Occupation. 


Post-office. 












Quillin, Va. 
Jamesville, N. C. 


Lewis, Joseph A. 


Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 




Elizabeth City, N. C. 
Chapanoke, N. C. 
Moyock, N. C. 









1904. 



Askew-Spellman, Willie G. 

Brockett, Mary E. 

Cherry, David K 

Cooper, Henry D. 

Cooper, Roberta Overton - 

Gaskill, Carrie A. 

Gregory, Sarah F 

Jordan, Benjamin F. 

Newby, Julia E 

Outlaw, William A. 

Phelps, Lela A 

Riddick, John T. 

Speller, Richard B. 

Staton, Robert A. 

Warren, Herbert 

Wilson, Alice O 



Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 



Teacher 
Teacher 



Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Elizabeth City, N. C. 
i Powellsville, N. C. 

Windsor, N. C. 
I Elizabeth City, N. C. 

New Bern, N. C. 
I Edenton, N. C. 

Idalia, N. C. 

Elizabeth City, N. C. 
; Windsor, N. C. 

Edenton, N. C. 

Elizabeth City, N. C. 
[ Windsor, N. C. 

Jamesville, N. C 

Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Moyock, N. C. 



1905. 

Name. Post-office. 

Brown, Ida A. Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Brothers, Edward L Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Bright, March Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Calvert, Ruth A. Margarettsville, N. C. 

Daughtry, Louetta A. 1 Winfall, N. C. 



30 



GRADUATES AND WHAT THEY DO -Continued. 
1905. 



Post-office. 



Winfall, N. C. 
Edenton, N. C. 
Elizabeth City, N. C. 
Colerain, N. C. 
Kinston, N. C. 
Elizabeth City, N. C. 
Colerain, N, C. 
Elizabeth City. N. C. 
Elizabeth City, N. C. 
Elizabeth City, N. C. 
Elizabeth City, N. C. 
Skinner, Ferribee G ! Durant's Neck, N. C. 



Felton, Ellenor E 

Hawkins, Laura J 

Harvey, Mattie L. 

Jenkins, Golena O 

Kornegay, Raleigh W. 

Mebane, Hattie A. 

Mizell, Annie J 

Midgett, Mary E 

Newby, Maggie E 

Robbins, LillieE 

Sawyer, Sarah F. 



Skinner, Ellen E 

Smallwood, William A, 

Sumner, Mary F. 

Taylor, Lillie B 

Thomas, Kate U. 

Trafton, Eliza L. V 

White, Lucy A 



Philadelphia, Pa. 
Quitsna, N. C. 
Durant's Neck, N. C. 
Clinton, N. C. 
Elizabeth City, N. C. 
Belcross, N. C. 
Elizabeth City, N. C. 



Ashby, Mamie E 

Badham, Charles E.- 
Blount, James N. — 
Brinkley, Maggie A. 

Bowe, Cora W 

Cherry, Sillena C — 

Collins, Moses L 

Coleman, Maggie E. 
Cooper, Lamb H. N. 
Hopkins, Izetta R.-- 
Hinton, Clarkie A.-- 

Jones, George T 

Mann, Clifton E 



Tulls, N. C. 
Edenton, N. C. 
Pleasant Hill, N. C. 
Quillin, Va. 
Elizabeth City, N. C. 
Colerain, N. C. 
Woodville, N. C. 
Norfolk, Va. 
Windsor, N. C. 
Manteo, N. C. 
Elizabeth City, N. C. 
Lewiston, N. C. 
Elizabeth City, N. C. 



31 



GRADUATES AND WHAT THEY DO-Continued. 
1906. 



Name. 

Overton, Lizzie I 

Piland, Emily O 

Rowson, James H. 

Reeves, Julia M. 

Stalling-, Annie G. 

Sharp, Pearle A. G 

Sharp, Lala L 

Thompson, James E 

Thompson, Arthur C 

Watson, Fannie B 

Whitehurst, Olivia W 

Wilson, Nina B 

Wilson. Gold R 

Willie, Mary E 

Williams, John C 



Post-office. 



Elizabeth City, N. C. 
Gates, N. C. 
Roper, N. C. 
Hamilton, N. C. 
Elizabeth City, N. C. 
Harrellsville, N. C. 
Harrellsville, N. C. 
Windsor, N. C. 
Windsor, N. C. 
Windsor, N. C. 
Elizabeth City, N. C. 
Moyock, N. C. 
Renoville, Va. 
Sladesville, N. C. 
Elizabeth City, N. C. 



PUPILS 1905-'06. 



FIRST-YEAR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS. 
School Year, September 18, 1905, to May 4. 1906. 



Names of Students 



Brown, Ida A 

Daughtry, Louetta A. 

Felton, Ellenor E 

Harvey, Mattie L. 

Newby, Maggie E. — 

Robbins, Lillie E 

Skinner, Ellen E. 



s 

< 


a 


Date of 
Entrance. 


County. 


28 


33 


Sept. 25 


Pasquotank. 


19 


23 


Nov. 2 


Perquimans. 


20 


22 


Oct. 31 


Perquimans. 


18 


2 


Oct. 12 


Pasquotank. 


18 


150 


Sept. 18 


Pasquotank. 


17 


20 


Dec. 5 


Pasquotank. 


22 


24 


Oct. 16 


Chowan. 



FOURTH-YEAR STUDENTS. 

School Year, September 18, 1005, to May 4, 100G. 



Archer, Lucy C 

Ashby, Mamie E 

Badham, Charles E. . 

Bowe, Cora W 

Blount, James N. 
Brinkley, Maggie A. 
Coleman, Maggie E.. 
Cherry, Sillena C. — 

Cooper, Lamb N. 

Collins, Moses 

Douglas, William N. 
Hinton, Clarkie A. -- 
Hopkins, Izettia R.-- 

Jones, George T. 

Jenkins, David 

Jones, Mai-y E. 

Moore, James H. 

Mann, Clifton E. 

Overton, Lizzie I. -— 
Piland. Emily O 



21 


21 


Nov. 


14 


Perquimans. 


18" 


139 


Oct. 


16 


Currituck. 


18 


158 


Sept. 


18 


Chowan. 


17 


150 


Sept. 


18 


Pasquotank. 


26 


150 


Sept. 


25 


Northampton 


22 


117 


Oct. 


18 


Norfolk, Va. 


18 


.154 


Sept. 


18 


Noifolk, Va. 


26 


122 


Oct. 


3 


Bertie. 


19 


145 


Oct. 


9 


Bertie. 


22 


9,) 


Jan. 


2 


Perquimans. 


21 


3 







Perquimans. 


19 


133 


Oct. 


10 


Pasquotank. 


20 


140 


Sept. 


21 


Dare. 


23 


155 


Sept. 


25 


Bertie. 


22 


60 


Sept. 


IS 


Bertie. 


35 


13 


Oct. 


24 


Pasquotank. 


24 


125 


Oct. 


6 


Craven. 


19 


143 


Oct. 


9 


Pasquotank. 


16 


149 


Sept. 


IS 


Pasquotank. 


23 


120 


Sept. 


26 


Gates. 



33 



FOURTH-YEAR STUDENTS— Continued. 



Names of Students. 



Date of 
Entrance. 



County. 



Reeves, Julian M. 

Rowsom, James H. 

Stalling, Annie G. 

Snowden, Ida V. 

Sharp, Pearlie I. 

Sharp, Lala L. 

Sutton, Arthur N. 

Thompson, Arthur C. - 
Thompson, James E. — 

Wilson, Nina B 

Wilson, Gold R. 

Whitehurst, Olivia W. 

Willie, Mary E. 

Watson, Fannie B. 

Webb, Lucy C 

Williams, John C 



158 Sept. 
10 Sept. 

153 Sept. 

22 Oct. 
120 Oct. 

134 ! Oct. 

92 j Oct. 
132 Oct. 

90 Jan. 

159 Sept. 

160 Sept. 
152 Sept. 

94 Oct. 
118 Oct. 

21 ! Oct. 

22 ; March 



Martin. 

Washington. 

Pasquotank. 

Camden. 

Hertford. 

Hertford. 

Washington. 

Bertie. 

Bertie. 

Currituck. 



Princess 
j Anne, Va. 
18 j Pasquotank. 



Hyde. 
Bertie. 
Perquimans. 
Pasquotank. 



THIRD-YEAR STUDENTS. 
School Year. September 18, 1905. to May 4, 1906. 



Askew, Elizabeth 


19 


150 


Sept. 


19 


Bertie. 
















17 


125 




18 










Sept. 


















17 


144 


Oct. 


9 






, 4 










Boyd, Joshua-- 


23 


54 


Nov. 


14 


Hertford. 








Jan 




Northampton. 




19 








Bass, Hattie O. - - - 


17 


44 




6 




Cartwright, Addie P 


18 


160 


Sept. 


18 


Chowan. 




19 

18 


155 
150 


Sept. 
Sept. 


18 

18 




Capehart, Ida O. 


Anne, Va. 
Chowan. 



34 



THIRD-YEAR STUDENTS-Continued. 



Names of Students. 



County. 



Cherry, Malinda 

Dey, Apollos 

Dillahunt, Susan E. - 

Dickens, Mary E.- 

Dickens, Lula E. 

Davis, Enolia L 

Everett, Daisy F 

Everett, Goldia E.— . 

Ellis, Minnie B. 

Fitts, EmmaM. 

Garris, James E. 

Griffin, Lena C 

Hawkins, Etta L 

Hollowell, Josephine 

Harris, Idel M. 

Hargett, Ida M. 

Hinton, Kittie V 

Hyman, James J 

Holloman, Luke 

Johnson, Martha A. - 

Jordan, Philip W 

Maloy, Mary L 

Outlaw, Jennie L 

Perkins, Malinda A.- 
Person, Willie 

Person, Lewis 

Rayner, Mary E. 

Rayner, Madison T. - 

Rayner, Carrie L 

Styron, Cora M. 

Sills, Mary E. 

Simons, Pinkie R 

Taylor, Addie V. 

Thornton, Mabel P. — 



Oct. 
Sept. 
Oct. 
Dec. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
147 | Sept. 
149 ! Sept. 
43 j Sept. 
89 Jan. 
56 Nov. 
88 Jan. 
98 Sept. 
101 Sept. 
156 Sept. 
37 Sept. 
19 Sept. 
124 | Oct. 
35 Nov. 

119 Sept. 

136 ! Oct. 

I 
131 I Sept. 

120 , Oct. 
117 J Sept. 
124 I Nov. 
124 Nov. 
105 Sept. 
109 Sept. 

29 Nov. 

22 Sept. 

122 Oct. 

SO Nov. 

26 Sept. 

17 Oct. 

S8 Jan. 



Bertie. • 

Currituck. 
Craven. 
Pasquotank. 
Pasquotank. 
Warren. 
Washington. 
Martin. 
Northampton. 
Warren. 
Northampton. 
Martin. 
Pasquotank. 
Pasquotank. 
Northampton. 
Lenoir. 
Pasquotank. 
Bertie. 
Hertford. 
Pasquotank. 
Beaufort. 
Pasquotank. 
Bertie. 
Pasquotank. 
Northampton. 
Northampton. 
Bertie. 
19 ! Bertie. 



13 i Martin. 
22 Bertie. 
26 j Craven. 

9 ' Hertford. 
22 Bertie. 
25 Camden. 

2 Warren. 



35 



THIRD- YEAR STUDENTS— Continued. 



Names of Students. 



Williams, Willie - 
Williams, Annie E 

Wilson, Ida W 

White, Amanda J. 
Willie, Edward H. 



Date of 
Entrance. 



Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Oct. 
Oct. 



County. 



18 Camden. 

19 Lenoir. 
Currituck. 
Bertie. 
Hyde. 



16 



SECOND-YEAR STUDENTS. 

School Year, September 18, 1905, to May 4, 1906. 



Alston, Alice M 

Bright, Johnnie 

Brockett, Katie E. — 
Barcliff, John W.H.- 
Barnard, Mary I 

Brown, Jessie B. 

Brinn, Minnie M 

Boston, Noah 

Bond, Daisy M.-; 

Cogdell, Cora A 

Cartwright, Roxana- 
Corprew, Adelaide — 

Carter, Mary 

Cooper, Willie A. 

Cooper, Annie W. --- 

Cox, Mettie L 

Cooper, Willie H 

Cheek, Minnie L 

Cherry, SymeraT.--- 

Davis, Peter W. 

Dickens, Mariah 

Foreman, Ella M 

Felton, Miley I 

Faison, Sallie J. 

Gatling, Arvey V 

Gordon, Joseph H. -- 



18 


87 


Jan. 


2 


Northampton. 


14 


143 


Sept. 


18 


Pasquotank. 


14 


157 


Sept. 


18 


Pasquotank. 


16 


99 


Nov. 


6 


Perquimans. 


24 


152 


Sept. 


18 


Currituck. 


17 


136 


Sept. 


18 


Pasquotank. 


16 


147 


Oct. 


2 


Perquimans. 


16 


47 


Oct. 


16 


Martin. 


18 


48 


Feb. 


23 


Bertie. 


21 


154 


Sept. 


19 


Lenoir. 


21 


111 


Oct. 


2 


Pasquotank. 


18 


29 


Oct. 


2 


Currituck. 


17 


122 


Oct. 


17 


Bertie. 


17 


130 


Oct. 


23 


Bertie. 


17 


124 


Oct. 


23 


Bertie. 


18 


127 


Oct. 


23 


Perquimans. 


20 


101 


Nov. 


6 


Pasquotank. 


20 


109 


Nov. 


27 


Warren. 


17 


53 


Jan. 


3 


Bertie. 


18 


129 


Sept. 


18 


Pasquotank. 


19 


118 


Nov. 


7 


Halifax. 


18 


50 


Sept. 


18 


Bertie. 


15 


121 


Oct. 


31 


Perquimans. 


19 


89 


Jan. 


2 


Northampton 


22 


74 


Dec. 


4 


Hertford. 


21 


3 


Oct. 


9 


Perquimans. 



36 



SECOND-YEAR STUDENTS— Continued. 



Names of Students. 



Date of 

Entrance. 



County. 



Houcutt, Marie L 

Hollomon, Willie B 

Hoggard, Maggie 

Hollowell, Mary E 

Harrison, Katie L 

Holly, Easter 

Johnson, Ida M. 

James, Julia A 

Kee, Mamie M 

Keys, Chelise 

Keys, Cottie A 

Kee, Mary I 

Leigh, Roy 

Long, Mamie H 

Moore, Ruth S 

Mizell, Celia W 

Moore, William K 

Montgomery, Priseilla C 

Newby, Benjamin H 

Overton, Mary L 

Overton, James 16 

Peterson, Maggie R 

Phelps, Estella 

Pool, Malinda A 

Peebles, Annie R. 

Rice, Cradie 

Riddick, Isabella 

Rowsom, Clarelon C. 

Riddick, Daisy L. 

Rollins, Lorena 

Sawyer, Minnie E 

Simpson, Hattie A 

Simpson, Ebner F. 

Stephenson, Madie 

Spellman, Maud R 



16 


104 


Sept. 


18 


Pasquotank. 


17 


160 


Sept. 


18 


Currituck. 


16 


128 


Sept. 


18 


Pasquotank. 


16 


109 


Sept. 


20 


Pasquotank. 


23 


138 


Sept. 


25 


Washington. 


19 


133 


Oct. 


10 


Pasquotank. 


17 


98 


Sept. 


18 


Pasquotank. 


19 


131 


Oct. 


20 


Northampton. 


19 


129 


Oct. 


19 


Northampton. 


20 


108 


Nov. 


27 


Beaufort. 


18 


110 


Nov. 


27 


Beaufort. 


23 


42 


Jan. 


3 


Northampton. 


15 


140 


Sept. 


18 


Pasquotank. 


18 


136 


Oct. 


11 


Northampton. 


14 


150 


Sept. 


18 


Pasquotank. 


22 


150 


Sept. 


i. 


Bertie. 


24 


123 


Oct. 


23 


Craven. 


18 


87 


Jan. 


3 


Norfolk, Va. 


17 


127 


Oct. 


9 


Pasquotank. 


14 


159 


Sept. 


18 


Pasquotank. 


16 


132 


Sept. 


18 


Pasquotank. 


20 


154 


Sept. 


18 


Bertie. 


19 


125 


Sept. 


18 


Pasquotank. 


19 


128 


Sept. 


IS 


Pasquotank. 


18 


146 


Oct. 


16 


Northampton 


17 


147 


Sept. 


IS 


Pasquotank. 


19 


129 


Sept. 


18 


Pasquotank. 


18 


96 


Sept. 


18 


Washington. 


20 


150 


Sept. 


27 


Gates. 


15 


133 


Oct. 


9 


Chowan. 


16 


135 


Sept. 


18 


Pasquotank. 


12 


135 


Sept. 


18 


Pasquotank. 


14 


159 


Sept. 


IS 


Pasquotank. 


17 


101 


Oct. 


23 


Northampton 


16 


107 


Oct. 


23 


Currituck. 



SECOND-YEAR STUDENTS-Continued. 



Names of Students. 



Date of 
Entrance. 



County. 



Maggie P 

Smith, Bulah G 

Smith, Bessie A 

Sessoms, Pattie J 

Stephenson, Delia F. 
Targinton, Fannie C. 

Turner, Isaiah 

Taylor, Lucy B 

Toomer, Rosia 

Whitehurst, Mary I.- 
Williams, SallieA 

Woodhouse, Mary J.- 
Whitehurst, Ada E.-. 

White, Paulina 

Webb, Emma 

Young, Annie M. B.- 



21 


120 


Nov. 


8 


Perquimans. 


18 


IS 


Nov. 


14 


Bertie. 


20 


92 


Nov. 


11 


Pasquotank. 


22 


120 


Oct. 


3 


Bertie. 


19 


77 


Jan. 


11 


Northampton 


14 


155 


Sept. 


18 


Pasquotank. 


26 


38 


Sept. 


18 


Camden. 


k 


98 


Oct. 


9 


Bertie. 


18 


49 


Jan. 


4 


Chatham. 


14 


153 


Sept. 


18 


Pasquotank. 


20 


150 


Sept. 


18 


Norfolk, Va. 


17 


152 


Sept. 


18 


Pasquotank. 


16 


46 


Sept. 


18 


Pasquotank. 


17 


131 


Oct. 


2 


Pasquotank. 


15 


143 


Oct. 


4 


Perquimans. 


18 


133 


Oct. 


23 


Northampton. 



FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS. 

School Year, September 18, 1905, to May 4, 1900. 



Adams, Jennie E. 

Alexander, Elizabeth- 
Barnes, Willie 

Bright, Annie L. 

Bright, Viola 

Bright, Freddie 

Blount, Mary O 

Banks, Mahalia 

Bowser, Briettie T 

Bowser, Moranda L.— 

Beasley, Rosetta 

Barnes, Nicye 

Bell, Annie M. 

Cartwright, Elenora - 
Cooper, Ethel E. S 



16 


73 


16 


114 


13 


154 


13 


121 


16 


144 


10 


143 


19 


152 


19 


121 


15 


51 


14 


54 


20 


71 


16 


73 


17 


87 


17 


132 


16 


159 



Sept. 
Nov. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Oct. 
Nov. 
Nov. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Sept. 
Sept. 



Pasquotank. 

Halifax. 

Pasquotank. 

Pasquotank. 

Pasquotank. 

Pasquotank. 
8 Chowan. 
2 : Pasquotank. 
21 ! Tyrrell. 
21 Tyrrell. 

2 I Bertie. 
10 | Chowan. 

3 | Pasquotank. 
18 ! Pasquotank. 
18 I Washington. 



38 



FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS— Continued. 



Names of Students. 



s 

< 




Date of 

Entrance. 


County. 


18 


60 


Nov. 


15 


Northampton. 


22 


50 


Jan. 


2 


Currituck. 


17 


90 


Jan. 


2 


Northampton. 


18 


75 


Jan. 




Beaufort. 


21' 


74 


Jan. 


16 


Bertie. 


17 


122 


Oct. 


23 


Pasquotank. 


17 


88 


Jan. 


2 


Northampton. 


22 


44 


Jan. 


2 


Northampton. 


17 


72 


Jan. 


8 


Pasquotank. 


15 


28 


March 


26 


Gates. 


17 


156 


Sept. 


18 


Pasquotank. 


15 


159 


Sept. 


18 


Martin. 


15 


127 


Sept. 


18 


Pasquotank. 


18 


38 


Jan. 


3 


Hyde. 


17 


75 


Jan. 


8 


Currituck. 


17 


1 


Jan. 


8 


Pasquotank. 


18 


134 


Sept. 


25 


Bertie. 


16 


130 


Oct. 


13 


Craven. 


18 


163 


Oct. 


23 


Gates. 


16 


119 


Oct. 


25 


Currituck. 


17 


77 


Jan. 


3 


Pasquotank. 


19 


84 


Jan. 


3 


Chowan. 


18 


36 


Jan. 


10 


Pasquotank. 


16 


64 


Feb. 


1 


Gates. 


17 


119 


Sept. 


18 


Pasquotank. 


15 


159 


Sept. 


18 


Pasquotank. 


16 


148 


Sept. 


18 


Norfolk, Va. 


22 


129 


Oct. 


9 


Beaufort. 


20 


84 


Jan. 


2 


Perquimans. 


17 


95 


Jan. 


2 


Bertie. 


16 


11 


Jan. 


22 


Bertie. 


14 


141 


Sept. 


18 


Pasquotank. 


16 


82 


Jan. 


8 


Pamlico. 


17 


59 


Jan. 


15 


Hertford. 



Calvert, Willie C 

Chatmon, James A. -- 

Calvert, Mary L. 

Coffey, Pauline A 

Cherry, Rachel E 

Dozier, Drusilla 

Deloatch, Cora L. 

Deloatch, George T. — 

Duers, Duncan 

Felton, Cassanda 

Gregory, Elsie 

Green, Emma I. 

Glover, Fred 

Gray, William B 

Gallop, Lethia 

Gibson, George 

Hayes, Mamie L. 

Hawkins, Hannah 

Hoskins, Katie 

Haley, Lizzie 

Holly, Anna 

Harris, Alethia R 

Hollowell, Christophe: 

Hurdle, Elnora 

Johnson, Fannie F 

Johnson, Daisy L 

Johnson, Alice F 

Jordan, Sylva 

Jones, Alexander 

Jenkins, Minnie S. — 
Jenkins, Dunkin W. - 

Lamb, Sophia M 

Lovick, Matilda 

Lassiter, Mollie B 



39 



FIRST- YEAR STUDENTS— Continued. 



Names of Students. 


CD 
< 


c 
to ° 


Date of 
Entrance. 


County. 




20 
17 
13 
17 
13 
16 
14 
17 
17 
14 
15 
16 
15 
18 
16 
21 
16 
17 
20 
15 
17 
16 
14 
13 
16 
25 
15 
14 
13 
14 
14 
15 
19 
15 


37 
77 
157 
150 
133 
126 
125 
59 
64 
65 
158 
135 

46 
73 
57 
137 
120 
55 
42 
38 
42 
44 
137 
133 
124 
153 
148 
156 
157 
140 
103 
77 


Feb. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Feb. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Jan. 

Feb. 

March 

Maixh 

March 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Dec. 


12 
18 
18 
18 
18 
22 
22 

2 
25 
25 
18 
16 
26 

5 
18 

2 

18 
23 
19 
12 

6 

6 

6 
18 

9 
23 
18 
18 
18 
25 

2 

2 
26 

4 






Pasquotank. 














































Pasquotank. 
Pasquotank. 








Washington. 


























Pasquotank. 






Northampton. 

Pasquotank. 

Pasquotank. 

Pasquotank. 

Pasquotank. 














Pasquotank. 
Pasquotank. 
Pasquotank. 




White, Maggie 



10 



FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS— Continued. 



Names of Students. 


bo 
< 


to » 


Date of 
Entrance. 


County. 


White, Isadora 

Willie, Mettrah S. -- 


16 

18 
17 
18 


52 
40 
20 


Dec. 4 
Jan. 2 
Jan. 3 
Feb. 5 


Pasquotank. 
Hyde. 




Pasquotank. 









SUMMARY OF ENROLLMENT. 

Normal high school 7 

Normal elementary — fourth year 36 

third year 54 

second year 77 

first year 87 

Primary school 59 

Total 320 



FAYETTEVILLE 



COLORED NORMAL SCHOOL 



l905-'06 



(twenty-ninth year) 



THE SESSION OF l905-'06 BEGINS MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1906 



LOCAL BOARD OF MANAGERS: 
H. L. Cook, Chairman, H. W. Lilly, Treasurer, 

Q. K. Nimmocks, Secretary, L. C. Brodgen, 
R. F. DeVane. 



TEACHERS: 

E. E. Smith, Principal. 

J. F. K. Simpson, J. G. Smith, 

Miss E. J. Council, Miss I. G. Jacobs, 

Miss E. W. Jacobs. 



SOCIETIES. 



The Normal School Literary Society meets once a week. The Nor- 
mal Band of Hope, a temperance society, meets once a month. These 
societies are under the supervision and direction of the Normal School 
teachers. 



BOARD. 



Board costs $5 to $7 per month. Students who board in private 
families must conform to the regulations of the school and be subject 
to the advice and direction of the principal in the selection of board- 
ing accommodations. 



PAID CONTRIBUTIONS 1905-'06. 



The following sums have been paid toward purchasing a site and 
erecting a building for the Fayetteville Normal School, May, 1905, to 
May, 1906 : 

BY COLORED PEOPLE. 

G. W. McMillan, $1 ; James C. Gill, $5; Dennis Tysor, $1 ; Rev. J. S. 
Brown, $1; W. J. Peacock, $5; Fred. Fleming, $5; E. N. Williams. 
$20; Mrs. Annette Council, $5; Mrs. Rachel McAlister, $5; cash, $1 ; 
R. W. Thaggard, $2 ; Prof. E. Evans, $5 ; Samuel Hodges, $3 ; Rev. 
N. B. Dunham, $2; Rev. J. S. Settle, $5; W. H. McNeill, $5; O. A. 
Cogdell, $2 ; H. C. Tyson, .$1 ; E. J. Campbell, $2 ; G. A. P. Wilkerson, 
$5 ; Joshua Barney, $10 ; S. L. McQueen, $5 ; proceeds concert, $40 ; 
proceeds concert, $21 ; Miss E. W. Jacobs, $5 ; Miss E. J. Council. $25 : 
Miss I. G. Jacobs, $25 ; Prof. J. F. K. Simpson, $13 ; Prof. J. G. Smith. 
$25 ; E. E. Smith, $50 ; Miss Virginia T. Thurston, $2 ; cash, in differ- 
ent sums, $5; cash collected by E. N. Williams, $8.84. Total, $315.84. 

BY WHITE PEOPLE. 

J. W. Ingold, $5; J. B. Starr, $5; A. A. McKethan, $5; Bevil & Van- 
story. $5 ; E. E. Gorham, $5 ; II. Lutterloh, $5 ; Bank of Fayetteville. 
$15 ; National Bank of Fayetteville, $15 ; F. W. Thornton, $5 ; W. E. 
Kindley, $5; Fayetteville Furniture Co., $5; Mike Folb, $5; W. F. 
Blount, $5 ; J. A. Oat.es, $5 ; S. H. McRae, Esq., $5 ; H. C. Bash. $5 ; 
Huske Hardware House, $25; Cape F. D. G. Co., $5; J. B. Troy, $5: 
W. II. Marsh, $5.; W. M. Walker, $4; R. Burns, $5; The Armfield 
Company, $5 ; W. M. Martin, $5 ; J. H. Culbreth & Co., $5 ; E, II. Jen- 
nings, $2; Fayetteville Ice Company, $5; B. E. Sedbery Sons. $5: 
D. H. Ray, $5 ; J. L. Kennedy, $5 ; B. C. Gorham, $5 ; Shuford, Rogers 
& Co.. $5; A. P. Johnson, $5; W. L. Hawley, $1; A. H. Slocumb, $1; 
J. C. Gorham, $1 ; A. L. McCaskell, $1 ; J. M. Goddard. $2 ; W. T. San- 
ders, $1 ; L. C. Wooten, $1 ; J. M. Lamb,-$5. Total, $214. 

SUMMARY OF PAID CONTRIBUTIONS. 

From colored people $315.S4 

From white people 214.00 

Total $529.84 



45 



FOURTH-YEAR STUDENTS. 

School Year, September 18, 1905, to May 4, 1906. 



Names of Students. 



Barney, Caroline 16 

Black, John W 19 

Coley, Robert F 24 

Fleming, John Walter 24 

Jiggetts, Carrie B j 18 

Jones, Estella j 16 

McAllister, Annette H 18 

McLauchlin, William H 23 

McMillan, George W I 21 



Sept. 

Oct. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 
j Sept. 
'• Sept. 
Oct. 
Oct. 



18 Cumberland. 

9 ] Robeson. 
18 ! Wayne. 
25 \ Sampson. 
18 Robeson. 
18 1 Bladen. 
18 Cumberland. 

2 Cumberland. 
31 j Cumberland. 



THIRD-YEAR STUDENTS. 

School Year, September 18, 1905, to May 4, 190G. 



Bethea, Sarah E 

Cromartie, Lettie J. 

Goodman, Flora K 

Johnson, Lena A 

Kennedy, Anthony T. 

McKay, Douglass 

McNeill, Ella J 

Melvin, Amerida C 

Melvin, Dora 

Melvin, Nellie J 

Moore, Coleman 

Morrison, Christian J. 

Morrison, Geneva H _ 25 

Newell, Aurelia C 

Parker, Olivia 

Patterson, Ezekiel K 

Williams, Emily E. 

Williams, Wayman 



20 


120 





23 







15 


153 





21 


118 





21 


40 


1 


19 


50 





16 


157 





14 


101 


2 ! 


20 


122 





18 


122 





19 


50 





23 


58 





25 


68 





21 


143 





20 


35 





1 20 


37 


1 


21 


39 





15 


44 






Nov. 


6 


Oct. 


2 


Sept. 


19 


Nov. 


6 


March 


12 


Sept. 


18 


Sept. 


18 


Sept. 


19 


Nov. 


6 


Nov. 


6 


Sept. 


18 


Nov. 


20 


Nov. 


20 


Oct. 


2 


Oct. 


20 


March 


12 


Oct. 


20 


Dec. 


25 



South Carolina 

Bladen. 

Cumberland. 

Cumberland. 

Lenoir. 

Bladen. 

Bladen, 

Cumberland. 

Cumberland. 

Cumberland. 

Bladen. 

Cumberland. 

Cumberland. 

Bladen. 

Cumberland. 

Lenoir. 

Cumberland. 

Cumberland. 



10 



SECOND-YEAR STUDENTS. 
School Year, September IS, 1905, to May 4, 1900. 



Names of Students. 



£§ 



& sf 2 .i a 



Errant. 



Adams, Lillie M 

Anderson, Mary A. — 

Andrews, Hattie B 

Armstrong, Minnie A. 



Avant, Alice . 18 

Baldwin, Lizzie i 20 

Beatty, Hannah D. j 16 

Beathea, R. L 21 

Blaekman, Mary C j 18 

Boykin, William O I 20 

Brooks, Mary Hattie j 14 

Brown, Ida Moore ' 19 

Caple, Mary K. -•- 16 

^Cogdell, Daisy 19 

Covington, Susie A. 17 

Evans, Allen T i 17 

Evans, William ', 19 

Galbreath, Robert T. 19 

Geddie, Marsana 23 

Holmes, Emma J 15 

Hughes, Delilah 18 

Jackson, Lula 23 

Jiggetts, Willie 15 

Johnson, Alice Lee , 18 

Kelly, William James 22 

Mallett, Maud 18 

McDonald, Effie J 18 

McKay, Mary C 17 



McKinnon, Wade 
McLean, John B. 
McPhail, Katie — 

McRae, Z. D. 

Owens, Rena A. - 
Ray, Mary C. 



| Oct. 
; Sept. 
Sept. 
Oct. 
Oct. 

! Oct. 

1 ! Sept. 
; Jan. 
, Sept. 
, Jan. 
| Oct. 
i Sept. 
i Nov. 
! Oct. 
| Jan. 
| Nov. 
Nov. 
Jan. 
Nov. 
Sept. 
Oct. 

| Nov. 

1 Nov. 
Nov. 
[ Jan. 
Feb. 
i Oct. 
; Nov. 
i Oct. 
Jan. 
Nov. 
Nov. 
Oct. 
Nov. 



18 Cumberland. 
18 i Cumberland. 
18 Cumberland. 
31 Cumberland. 
18 j Cumberland. 
2 | Scotland. 
18 Cumberland. 

22 Dillon, S. C. 
18 : Cumberland. 
15 Cumberland. 

2 | Robeson. 
18 I Warren. 

20 Cumberland. 

23 Cumberland. 

8 Cumberland. 
20 Cumberland. 
20 Cumberland. 

3 Robeson. 

13 Cumberland. 

18 Cumberland. 

9 Cumberland 
20 Cumberland. 
13 Robeson. 

13 Dillon, S. C. 
3 Bladen. 

19 Harnett. 

23 Cumberland. 

20 Moore. 
23 Robeson. 

3 Clio. S. C. 

20 Cumberland. 
27 Scotland. 

4 Sampson. 

20 Cumberland. 



47 



SECOND-YEAR STUDENTS— Continued. 



Names of Students. 



Reeves, Augusta 18 

Robinson, Lilly ! 19 

Smith, Carrie L :■ 18 



Smith, Catherine 
Smith, Elsie P. — 
Smith, Lauretta - 
Smith, Thomas J. 




Cumberland. 

Bladen. 

Harnett. 

Richmond. 

Cumberland. 

Harnett. 

Sampson. 



FIRST-YEAR 

School Year. September 



STUDENTS. 

18, 1905, to May 4, 1906. 



Adams, Mary B. 

Adams, Lou Bertha-- 

Ashley, Mary K 

Beatty, Isaac 

Berry, Bettie 

Brewing-ton, Julius -- 
Brewing-ton, Lillie C. 

Bryant, Maggie D 

Byrd, Louisa 

Caple, Sarah 

Cogdell, Mamie 

Cole, Mary C. 

Crawford, Mollie 

Crenshaw, Rosa Lee - 

David, Laura 

Davis, James 

Dixon, Thomas 

Evans, Alice 

Evans, Eugene 

Evans, Mary A. 

Evans, Mary J. 

Evans, Willie 

Freeman, Pearson — 
Graham, Lydia 



1 j Nov. 

2 Oct. 
Oct. 

3 Sept. 
Jan. 
Nov. 
Nov. 
Nov. 
Jan. 
Nov. 
Oct. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Oct. 
Sept. 



Nov. 



Nov. 
Nov. 
Nov. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Jan. 



25 



Cumberland. 
Cumberland. 
Cumberland. 
Cumberland. 
Cumberland. 
Sampson. 
Robeson. 
Cumberland. 
Cumberland. 
Cumberland. 
Cumberland. 
Cumberland. 
Richmond. 
Sampson. 
Scotland. 
Wake. 

Cumberland. 
Moore. 
Cumberland. 
Cumberland. 
Cumberland. 
Cumberland. 
Cumberland. 
15 ' Cumberland. 



48 



FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS-Continued. 



Names of Students. 



II 



Date of 

Entrance. 



Groton, Eliza . j 22 

Hendon, Ann Eliza 15 

Hurst, LillieE. 1 12 

Hurst, Nellie J. — — 17 

Johnson, Rebecca 15 

Kelly, Maggie 25 

Kelly, Robert * 17 

Lane, Sarah , 18 

Mainor, Irvin J 15 

Manning, John 21 

McAlister, Nancy V I 16 

McDonald, Sandy 1 26 

McKay, Josephine '. 1 19 

McNeill, Fannie _ 18 

Miller, Cicero 1 15 

Miller, John S 17 

Miller, Maggie B 15 

Monroe, Nina 17 

Morgan, Atha __ 11 

Mumford, L. J •— 20 

Murphy, John 14 

Murphy, Missouri 16 

Parker, Louvinia 15 

Ray, Joseph 15 

Roberts, Hattie 16 

Robinson, May J. — 16 

Robinson, Vinie 18 

Ross, L. M. 19 

Sampson, Cleveland 19 

Scurlock, Julia 1 17 

Simmons, Lany E. j 19 

Smith, Edna ! 14 

Smith, Pearler 15 

Spearman, Bertha 16 

Thames, Alberta 18 






Sept. 


18 


Cumberland. 


1 


Oct. 


9 


Cumberland. 


1 


Sept. 


25 


Cumberland. 





Oct. 


9 


Cumberland. 





Sept. 


18 


Cumberland. 





Nov. 


6 


Cumberland. 





Dec. 


18 


Cumberland. 





Nov. 


14 


Bladen. 





Oct. 


•16 


Cumberland. 


1 


Jan. 


15 


Cumberland. 





Nov. 


21 


Robeson. 


2 


Sept. 


19 


Cumberland. 


2 


Nov. 


21 


Cumberland. 


2 


Oct. 


30 


Cumberland. 


6 


Oct. 


16 


Cumberland. 





Oct. 


16 


■Cumberland. 





Sept. 


18 


Cumberland. 





Feb. 


5 


Cumberland. 





Feb. 


12 


Cumberland. 





Nov. 


6 


Richmond. 





Sept. 


25 


Cumberland. 





Oct. 


12 


Cumberland. 





April 


9 


Cumberland. 





Jan. 


3 


Robeson. 





Sept. 


18 


Cumberland. 





Nov. 


6 


Cumberland. 


o 


Nov. 


16 


Bladen. 





Dec. 


4 


Cumberland. 





Oct. 


30 ! 


Sampson. 





Nov. 


21 i 


Robeson. 


• 


Jan. 


3 


Robeson. 





Jan. 


29 


Robeson. 





Sept. 


18 1 


Robeson. 





Nov. 


14 


Cumberland. 





Sept. 


18 ' 


Cumberland. 



4!> 



FIRST- YEAR STUDENTS-Continued. 



Names of Students. 



Thames, Claudia 

Thames, John R 

Thurston, Virginia T. 
Toomer, Effie 

Underwood, Carrie 

Walker, Janie 

Walker, Mamie 

Whitted, Carrie L 

Whitted, John M. 

Williams, Alice D. 

Williams, Melissa 



Sept. 18 
Nov. 15 
Jan. 3 
Sept. 25 
March 6 



Sept. 
Oct. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Sept. 
Nov. 



Cumberland. 

Cumberland. 

Cumberland. 

Cumberland. 

Cumberland. 

Cumberland. 

Cumberland. 

Bladen. 

Bladen. 

Cumberland. 

Cumberland. 



STUDENTS NOT INCLUDED IN THE FOREGOING 
CLASSIFICATION. 



Name. 



Age. 



County. 



Andrews, Rena 15 

Baldwin, Willie 16 

Brown, L. M 1 17 

Carroll, I. M '< 21 

Fairley, Celia 14 

Halliday, A. T j 19 

McKinnon, Blanche ' 16 

McKinnon, Lillie 15 

McLaurin, Ora B. 16 

Smith, G. W. ! 18 

Townsend, Clarence 21 



Cumberland. 

Robeson. 

Cumberland. 

Robeson. 

Moore. 

Cumberland. 

Robeson. 

Robeson. 

Robeson. 

Cumberland. 

South Carolina 



50 



RECORD OF STUDENTS, 1905-'! 



Number of Students. 



Whose parents are farmers 

Whose parents are mechanics 

Whose parents operate saw-mills 

Whose parents are merchants 

Whose parents are preachers 

Whose parents follow other occupations 

Who paid their entire school expenses 

Who paid their school expenses in part 

Who were not absent a day for any cause 

Who were absent only on account of sickness 

Enrolled in fourth year 

Enrolled in third year 

Enrolled in second year 

Enrolled in first year 

Enrolled in non-classified Normal 

Total enrollment in Normal 

Enrollment in Practice School 

Grand total 



39 


96 


135 


7 


11 


18 


1 


1 


2 


2 


1 


3 


5 


9 


14 


2 


3 


5 


7 


2 


9 


11 


6 


17 


27 


63 


90 


10 


21 


31 



5 4 

7 | 11 

12 ! 29 

18 j 52 

3 I 8 



149 
167 
316 



SLATER STATE 



COLORED NORMAL SCHOOL 



( WINSTON-SALEM ) 



l905-'06 



(ELEVENTH YEAR) 



THE SESSION OF l906-'07 BEGINS OCTOBER I, 1906 



LOCAL BOARD OF MANAGERS: 
H. E. Fries, President, W. A. Blair, Treasurer, 

S. G. Atkins, Secretary, A. H. Eller, 

H. R. Starbuck. 



TEACHERS: 
C. G. O'Kelly, Principal. 
John W. Woody, Business Manager. 
Miss Ida E. Houston, Matron. 
F. M. Kennedy, P. J. Williams, 

John C. Williamson, O. R. Pope, 

Miss F. B. Watkins, Miss Hattie B. Holley, 

Miss L. M. Hayes, Miss Lillian L. Pulliam, 

John A. Croom. 



SOCIETIES. 



The Eureka Literary Society for young men and the Garrett Lit- 
erary Society for young women have regular meetings. There are 
also a Young Men's Christian Association, a Young Women's Temper- 
ance Union and a Christian Endeavor Society, which hold regular 
meetings and are helpful organizations in the promotion of good 
morals. 



EQUIPMENT. 



The Slater School has considerable equipment for industrial work 
Cooking, sewing, farming, dairying and gardening are taught. 



EXPENSES. 



Board (payable in advance), per month $6.00 

Washing 75 

Fuel 75 

Incidental fee for the school year 1.00 

AH students must furnish their own lights. 

All students must bring their own bedding, including quilts, blan- 
kets, sheets and pillow-cases. 

All students must pay at least one month's expenses before they can 
be enrolled. 

Students must pay for any damage to furniture or buildings result- 
ing from carelessness or violence. 



OTHER INFORMATION. 



Information not contained in this catalogue will be cheerfully fur- 
nished by the principal, C. G. O'Kelly, Winston, N. C. 



HOW SOME STUDENTS PAY THEIR EXPENSES. 



Hugh R. Mosley, Rockingham County, worked on a brick-yard to 
secure enough money to enter Slater in the winter of 1902. During 
first vacation he worked on a railroad in West Virginia. Has since 
paid his own way by all kinds of manual labor. Graduated May, 
1906. He is 23 years old. 

W. E. Patterson, Mecklenburg County, is 21 years old ; is in the first 
Normal class. He was born and reared on a farm ; picked peas and 
cotton for his neighbors to get money enough to come to Slater two 
years ago. He has been working on the school farm and making his 
own way. 

Charles W. Roseman, Lincoln County ; born 19 years ago. Carried 
mail on a star route to get railroad fare and clothes with which to 
leave home. Entered the primary school at Sinter in 1902. He has 
steadily worked on the farm and at other work to make his own way. 
He is now a member of the regular First-year Normal Class. 

Belle Ballard, 18 years old ; born in Camden, S. C. ; entered Slater in 
January, 1904 ; has worked at Slater Hospital laundry, in the Slater 
kitchen and at other work and has made her way for two years. She 
is now in the First-year Normal Class and thinks she can continue in 
school until she graduates. She pays all her expenses. 

Cornelius Redd. 17 years old ; graduated in 1906 ; has worked in a 
tobacco factory and made money enough to pay his expenses for five 
years. 

M. Q. Cele, 26 years old ; born in Africa ; he is learning our lan- 
guage and writes a fairly good hand. His story in his own words fol- 
lows : 

My home is in South eastern part of Africa. When the white mis- 
sionary first came over to the part of Africa where I came from I was 
very young, but he lived till I was grown enough to know him. So 
before he was there a long time my father became civilized, and he 
was told of this country and its school, so he made up his mind to 
send me over here. Although the expenses were so high to pay my 
way from Africa to here we knew that we can make up enough to 
bring me over here. We didn't know that the school shall cost me 
any thing since we didn't have any body to tell us that. So after all 
my father starded me for America. I reached New york City May 
25, 1901. I stop there one week, the white good friend I stoped with, 
he learned of Slater so he sent me to Slater School. When I first 
come here, three things discourage me badly that many times I wish 
that I never knew of this country. First was I couldn't talk English. 
Second I didn't have funds to pay my way in school. Third I came 
from a place where a man don't have to work, and so I never work 



55 

before I eorue here but when I find that I must work if I must live in 
this country so I make up my mind that I am going to work, so now 
I can do as much work as any man of my size and also I can talk 
little English and write such as I have written in this letter. I have 
been making my own way through school every since I came here. 
The way I get my schooling I work hard during vacation and two 
years ago I was fortunate to get a job in the city that I work at every 
afternoon when school duties are over I have to go there for cleaning 
up, and in that way I get help. And I hone to do that till I get 
through the school then return home to Africa. 

Madikane Qandiyane Gele. 
Slater School, 

Winston-Salem, 

N. C. 



WHAT SLATER STUDENTS ARE DOING THIS SUMMER. 



CLASS OF 1905. 



Names of Pupils. 


Present Occupation. 


Post-office. 




Teaching 

Factory 










Lincoln University. 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 


Reynolds, Joseph H 


Factory 


























Smith, Esther 


In school 


Raleigh, N. C. 









HIGH SCHOOL PUPILS 1905-'06. 



Ashe, Annie M At home Raleigh, N. C. 

Blackburn, Nettie E ; At home 1 Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Crown, Rosa With relatives New York City. 

Peace, Lula J At home , Raleigh, N. C. 



FOURTH-YEAR PUPILS 1905-'06. 



Battle, Lizzie E 

Carr, Roberta 

Diggs, Jessie E 

Diggs, James T 

Hairston, Chambers- 

Hauser, AllieM 

Mosley, Sallie M. 

Mosley, Hugh R. 

Phifer, Maria E 

Redd, W. Cornelius- 



Domestic service Salisbury, N. C. 

At home ; Winston-Salem, N. C. 

At home Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Carpenter Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Factory Winston-Salem, N. C. 

At home on a farm — Yadkin County. 

I 
At home on a farm--- Madison, N. C. 

At home on a farm- — j Madison, N. C. 

Domestic service ! Salisbury, N. C. 

Factory i Winston-Salem, N. C. 



5? 



THIRD-YEAR PUPILS 1905-'06. 



Names of Pupils 



Present Occupation. 



Post-office. 



Atkins, RusselC 

Beck, Annie 

Cele, M. Q 

Clark, Lillian N 

Fuller, Jessie 

Hanes, Emma 

Hancock, Radford C. 

Hauser, Mamie 

Hauser, Annie 

Jarratt, Maggie L 

Kennedy, Mabel 

Lopp, Nettie 

Mason, LucyB 

Mason, Nancy D 

Mitchell, Virginia — 

Pyne, Salena 

Ramseur, Vivian C. -. 

Turner, Elmer E 

Welch, Celestia 

Willis, Ada 



Excelsior factory Winston-Salem, N. C. 

At home on a farm--- Bethania, N. C. 

Factory : Winston-Salem, N. C. 

At home on a farm-- Yadkin County. 

Domestic service Winston-Salem, N. C. 

At home Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Clerk in store Winston-Salem, N. C. 

At home on a farm-- Yadkin County. 

At home Columbus, Ohio. 

At home on a farm--- Yadkin County. 

At home Winston-Salem, N. C. 

At home [ Thomasville, N. C. 

At home on a farm-— Raleigh, N. C. 

At home on a farm — Davie County. 

At home Winston-Salem, N. C. 

At home ! Goldsboro, N. C. 

Carpenter Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Shoe-maker Winston-Salem, N. C. 

At home on a farm--- Rockingham County. 

At home Winston-Salem, N. C. 



SECOND-YEAR PUPILS 1905-'06. 



Atkins, Harvey B. Excelsior factory Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Champlain, Lulu M At home Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Collett, Bessie At home Morganton, N. C. 

Covington, Carrie j At home on a farm — Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Diggs, Belle ! At home •-_ . Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Eaton, Buna Domestic service Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Galloway, Minnie L Domestic service Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Graham, Francis D. At home Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Green, Lillie M Domestic service Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Hall, Cleo At home Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Henderson, Ernest E. At home Liberty, N. C. 

Moyer, Robert S. Draying Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Oaks, Warner Factory Winston-Salem, N. C. 



58 



SECOND- YEAR PUPILS-Continued. 



Names of Pupils. 


Present Occupation. 


Post-office. 






Guilford College, N. C. 



















Sheffield, Orville— - 
Slaughter, Mattie — 

Tucker, Bessie 

Williams, Harry B.- 
Williamson, Eliza J. 



School farm ! Winston-Salem, N. C. 

At home ! Reidsville, N. C. 

Domestic service 1 Asheville, N. C. 

At home on a farm--- Davie County. 
Domestic service [ Davidson, N. C. 



FIRST-YEAR PUPILS 1905-'06. 



Ballard, Belle 

Bingham, Horace 

Bridges, Walter 

Chambers, Lois 

Copney, Alonzo 

Evans, Lena 

Garden, Clifton S 

Hairston, Susie 

Harrison, John L. — 

Hobson, Carvie 

Haywood, Colonel Q.- 
Johnson, William 

Koger, Pattie 

Lynch, Dolphus 

McNeely, J. P 

Noisette, Belle 

Patterson, W. E 

Ramseur, Thomas A. 

Ray, Ida 

Reynolds, Elsie 

Reynolds, Effie 

Robinson, Nettie 

Roseman, Charles --- 

Russel, Carrie 

Smith, Burette 



Domestic service 

Park guard 

Factory 

At home 

Hotel waiter 

At home 

At home 

At home on a farm — 

Draying 

Railroad 

At home on a farm — 

In service 

At home on a farm—- 

At home 

At home on a farm — ] 

Domestic service 

School farm 

Painting 

At home 

At home 

At home 

At home 

School dairy 

At home 

At home on a farm — 



Winston-Salem, N. C. 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 
Statesville, N. C. 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 
Madison, N. C. 
Morganton, N. C. 
Pine Hall, N. C. 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 
Garner, N. C. 
Columbus, Ohio. 
Bethania, N. C. 
Morganton, N. C. 
King's Mountain, N.C. 
Charlotte, N. C. 
Winston-Salem. N. C. 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 
Asheville, N. C. 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 
Asheville, N. C. 
Hiddenite, N. C. 



59 



FIRST-YEAR PUPILS— Continued. 



Names of Pupils. 



Present Occupation. 



Post-office. 



Vaughn, Cora 

Vaughn, Pearlie 

Wilson, Whitlock- — 
Wall, Peter 

Winchester, Bertha . 



At home on a farm---; Pine Hall, N. C. 
At home on a farm — i Pine Hall, N. C. 

At home Virginia. 

At home on a farm — Walnut Cove, N. C. 
At home Winston-Salem, N. C. 



PUPILS 1905-'06. 



HIGH SCHOOL PUPILS. 
School Year, September 28, 1905, to May 9, 1906. 



Names of Pupils. 


9 
bo 

< 




If 


Entered. 


County. 




20 
20 
19 

17 


149 
146 
135 
136 


1 
15 
2 



Oct. 9 
Sept. 28 
Oct. 23 
Oct. 23 






Forsyth. 
Forsyth. 
Wake. 




Peace, Lula J. 



FOURTH-YEAR PUPILS. 

School Year, September 28, 1905, to May 9, 190G. 



Battle, Lizzie E. - 

Carr, Roberta 

Diggs, Jessie E. . 
Diggs, James T. - 
Hairston, Chambe 
Hauser, Allie M. - 
Mosley, SallieM.- 
Mosley, Hugh R.^ 
Phifer, Maria E. - 



Redd, W. Cornelius 17 



20 


151 





19 


135 


2 


15 


60 


6 


16 


113 


11 


18 


106 





20 


156 





18 


156 





23 


142 


1 


23 


153 





17 


153 


1 



Sept. 


28 


Sept. 


28 


Sept. 


28 


Sept. 


28 


Oct. 


26 


Sept. 


28 


Sept. 


28 


Oct. 


16 


Sept. 


28 


Sept. 


28 



Craven. 

Forsyth. 

Forsyth. 

Forsyth. 

Forsyth. 

Yadkin. 

Rockingham. 

Rockingham. 

'Lincoln. 

Forsyth. 



THIRD-YEAR PUPILS. 

School Year, September 28, 1905, to May 9, 1906. 



Atkins, Russel C 15 

Beck, Annie j 21 

Cele, M. Q 26 

Clark. Lillian N. ! 18 

Fuller, Jessie 24 

Hanes, Emma j 19 

Hancock, Redford C. 23 

Hauser, Mamie I 19 

Hauser, Annie 17 



153 





132 





150 





151 





127 





3 





40 





156 





156 


2 



Sept. 28 Forsyth. 

Oct. 13 Forsyth. 

Oct. 4 Africa. 

Sept. 28 Yadkin. 

Sept. 28 Forsyth. 

Oct. 10 Forsyth. 

Oct. 19 Virginia. 

Sept. 28 Yadkin. 

Sept. 28 Forsyth. 



61 



THIRD-YEAR PUPILS-Continued. 



Names of Pupi 



el 



Jarratt, Maggie L 18 

Kennedy, Mabel 

Lopp, Nettie 

Mason, Lucy B. 18 

Mason, Nancy D. 

Mitchell, Virginia 16 

Pyne, Salena 17 

Ramseur, Vivian C 24 

Turner, Elmer E ; 20 

Welch, Cfelestia 21 

Willis, Ada 19 



Sept. 28 Yadkin. 
Sept. 28 | Tennessee. 
Oct. 24 ! Davidson. 



1 


Sept. 


28 


Wake. 





Jan. 


12 


Davie. 


1 


Oct. 


30 


Forsyth. 


1 


Oct. 


2 


Wayne. 


2 


Nov. 


16 


Lincoln. 


11 


Oct. 


2 


Forsyth. 





Sept. 


28 


Rockingham 


7 


Sept. 


28 


Forsyth. 



SECOND-YEAR PUPILS. 

School Yeak, September 28, 1905, to May 9, 1906. 



Atkins, Harvey B 

Champlain, Lulu M. - 

Collett, Bessie 

Covington, Carrie 

Diggs, Belle 

Eaton, Buna 

Galloway, Minnie L. - 
Graham, Frances D. - 

Green, Lillie M 

Hall, Cleo 

Henderson, Ernest F.. 

Moyer, Robert S 

Oaks, Warner 

Pitts, Ethel 

Reynolds, Roberta 

Scales, James 

Sheffield, Orville 

Slaughter, Mattie 

Tucker, Bessie 

Williams, Harry B. — 
Williamson, Eliza J. -. 



13 
18 


143 
154 


17 


143 


18 


116 


13 


139 


18 


93 


19 


152 


17 


116 


18 


155 


13 


91 


16 


129 


19 


142 


15 


133 


17 


113 


17 


119 


20 


84 


15 


75 


14 


44 


17 


142 


19 


29 


22 


116 



Oct. 
Sept. 
2 j Oct. 

: Nov. 
6 I Sept. 

1 I Nov. 
' Sept. 

Sept. 

1 Sept. 
! Dec. 

2 | Oct. 
I Oct. 

! Oct. 

1 ! Sept. 



•i\ 



Nov. 
Jan. 
Feb. 
2 Nov. 
Oct. 
Nov. 
Nov. 



17 Forsyth. 

Forsyth. 
16 Catawba. 
13 Forsyth. 

Forsyth. 

Davie. 
28 Forsyth. 
28 Forsyth. 
28 | Buncombe. 

4 , Forsyth. 
20 Alamance. 

5 Virginia. 
5 Forsyth. 

28 I Guilford. 



Forsyth. 

Rockingham 

Michigan. 

Forsyth. 

Buncombe. 

Davie. 

Mecklenburg. 



62 



FIRST-YEAR PUPILS. 
School Year, September 28, 1905, to May 9, 1906. 



Names of Pupils. 



Ballard, Belle 18 

Bingham, Horace 19 

Bridges, Walter — .- 17 

Chambers, Lois 16 

Copney, Alonzo 16 

Evans, Lena '- 18 

Garden, Clifton S 18 

Hairston, Susie 21 

Harrison, John L 20 

Hobson, Carvie 18 

Haywood, Colonel Q 22 

Johnson, William 17 

Koger, Pattie 19 

Lynch, Dolphus 1 17 

McNeely, J. P \ 28 

Noisette, Belle 18 

Patterson, W. E 21 

Ramseur, Thomas A 21 

Ray, Ida 15 

Reynolds. Elsie 16 

Reynolds, Eme 14 

Robinson, Nettie ^ 14 

Roseman, Charles 19 

Russel, Carrie 17 

Smith., Burette 20 

Vaughn, Cora 1 17 

Vaughn, Pearlie j 16 

Wall, Peter 

Wilson, Whitlock 

Winchester, Bertha 16 



r8 

£& 

152 
58 
93 

155 
57 
86 

118 
67 



Sept. 

Oct. 

Dec. 

Sept. 

Jan. 

Oct. 

Oct. 
j Oct. 
Nov. 
2 J Sept. 
j Jan. 
[ Oct. 
Jan. 

Oct. 

2 | Sept. 

1 i Oct. 
1 Sept. 

3 '. Sept. 
Sept. 

3 j Nov. 

4 j Nov. 
! Nov. 



Nov. 

Oct. 

Oct. 
1 j Oct. 
Oct. 
6 ; Oct. 
j Oct. 
6 ! Oct. 



63 



RECORD OF PUPILS, 1905-'06— HIGH SCHOOL AND NORMAL. 



Number whose parents are farmers 

Number whose parents are preachers 

Number whose parents are doctors 

Number whose parents have some other occupation- 
Total 



SUMMARY OF ENROLLMENT. 

Enrolled in High School 4 

Enrolled in Normal School SI 

Enrolled in Primary School 232 

Enrolled in Night School 31 

Special pupils IT 



Total enrollment 365 



DECREASE IN GENERAL ILLITERACY, 1880-1900. 



rotal population 10 years of age and ove 

White ... 

Colored 

"otal illiterates 10 years of age and over 
White 

' Colored ■— 

Percentage of illiteracy 

White 

Colored 



351, 145 

463,975 

192,032 

271,943 

48.3 

31.5 

77.4 



1S90. 



,147,446 
754,857 
392, 589 
409, 703 
173,722 
235,981 
' 35.7 
23.01 
60.11 



1900. 



1,342,669 

904, 978 

437,691 

386,251 

175,907 

210,344 

28.7 

19.5 

47.6 



DECREASE IN ILLITERACY, BY SEX, 1880-1900. 



1900. 



Decrease in 20 Years. 



Male illiterates 10 years of age and ; 213, 196 

over. 

■' White 84,064 

' Colored 129,132 

Female illiterates 10 years of age ! 250, 779 
and over. 

White i 107,968 

I 

Colored . 142,811 



184,506 181,228 31,968, or 15 per ct. 

75,726 j 82,492 1,572, or 1.87 per ct. 

108,780 I 98,736 30, 396, or 23. 5 per ct. 

225,197 j 205,023 45, 756, or 18. 2 per ct. 

97,996 I 93,415 14, 553, or 13. 4 per ct. 

127,201 111,608 31,203, or 21. 8 per ct. 



DECREASE IN SCHOOL-AGE ILLITERACY, 1880-1900. 



rotal illiterates 10 to 20, inclusive— . 173, 386 

I White 75,595 

Colored 97,791 



118, 000 
49,479 
68,321 



105,004 ! 68,382, or 39.4 per ct. 
49,616 25,979, or 34.3 per ct. 
55,388 ■• 42,403, or 43.3 per ct. 



\ Every son, whatever may be his expectations as to fortune, ought to 
|e so educated that he can superintend some part of the complicated 
machinery of social life ; and every daughter ought to be so educated 
that she can answer the claims of humanity, whether these claims 
require the labor of the head or the labor of the hand. — Horace Mann, 



"Every human being has a>n absolute, indefeasible right to an educa- 
tion : and there is the correlative duty of government to see that the 
means of education are provided for all. Government protects child- 
hood, but childhood has more than physical wants. Infanticide is 
prohibited.; hut life is not worth living unless instruction supervenes. 
Otherwise, no true life, no real manhood. It is a travesty on man- 
hood to make a brutal prize-fighter its representative. Education is 
due from government to children. The school is supplementary to 
family, to churches, in the province of education. Society rests upon 
education in its comprehensive meaning. Man must be educated out 
of, lifted above animal impulses — a state of nature — and made to 
respect social forms, the rights and duties of persons and property. 
Education is to prepare the individual for life in social- inHtitjLti;ins. 
Crime and ignorance and non-productiveness are antagonistic t<> 
society. ... The first necessity of civilization is a system of 
universal education."—/);-. •/. L. M. Curry. 

"The strength of every community is dependent upon the aver-.igt 
of the intelligence of that community, and this intelligence is depend 
ent upon the education of the entire mass and not of the few.' — 
Charles B. Aiicock. 

"To close the door of hope against any child within the borders of 
the State, whatever be his race or condition, by deliberately remov 
him from the possibility of securing such training as will fit him fi 
the life he has to live, is un-Christian, tin-democratic and un-Ameri 
cam' —Crov. X. C. Blanchard. 




CATALOGUE 



THIRTY-FIRST ANNUAL SESSION 



NORTH CAROLINA 



State Colored Normal School, 



FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



FOR THE YEAR l907-'8, 



NEXT SESSION BEGINS SEPTEMBER 14, 1908. 



CATALOGUE 



THIRTY-FIRST ANNUAL SESSION 



NORTH CAROLINA 



State Colored Normal School 



FAYETTEVILLE, N. C. 



FOR THE YEAR 1907-'8, 



NEXT SESSION BEGINS SEPTEMBER 14, 1903. 



LOCAL BOARD OF MANAGERS s 
Hon. H. L, Cook, Chairman, Q. K. Nimocks, Esq., Secretary, 

Dr. H. W. Lilly, Treasurer, Prof. L. C. Brogben, 

J. A. McAllister, N. A. Smith. 



FACULTY !907-'08r 

E. E. Smith, A. B., Ph. D., Principal, 

J. G. Smith, M. A. Talley, A. B.. 

Miss Mamie Roberts, A. B., 

Miss Kate R. Truman. 



FACULTY 1908-'09: 
E. E. Smith, A. B., Ph. D., Principal, - - - Shaw University, 

J. G. Smith, - - - - - - St. Augustine. 

Miss Mamie M. Roberts, A. B., - - - Shaw University. 

Miss Kate R. Truman, ... . - St. Augustine. 

Miss Myrtle L. Brooks, A. B., - - - - Oberlin College. 

Miss Mamie Blackman, - - - Hampton Institute. 



STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION. 



J. Y. Joyner, Superintendent of Public Instruction, Secretary. 

R. B. Glenn, Governor, President. 

F. D. Winston, Lieutenant-Governor. 

J. Bryan Grimes, Secretary of State. 

B. R. Lacy, Treasurer. 

R. D- Gilmer, Attorney-General. 

B. F. Dixon, Auditor. 



Superintendent of Colored Normals i 
John Duckett. 



By authority of laws enacted by the Legislature of 1903, 1905, and 
1907, the general control and management of the State Colored Normal 
School is vested in the above board and superintendent. 



GENERAL BNfORMATION. 

TUITION. 

Tuition in the normal school is free to those who in- 
tend to teach in the colored public schools of North Caro- 
lina. Those who do not intend to teach must pay $1.00 per 
month tuition. The school is sustained for the purpose of 
training teachers for the elementary public schools. It is 
only just and right that those who take advantage of the 
school, and who do not intend to teach, shall pay the tuition 
charges. 

All pupils must pay a contingent fee of $1.00 in advance. 
Graduates will have to pay $1.00 for diploma. 

REGULATIONS. 

The following regulations govern the school : 

1. Pupils of both sexes are to be admitted, but all board- 
ing pupils must consult the principal before making any 
arrangements for boarding outside the school dormitories. 

2. Only pupils of good moral character will be admit- 
ted or retained in the school. 

3. No pupil will be admitted to the school after the 
opening week, except upon examination, which examination 
will cover the previous work of the class to which admis- 
sion is sought. All such examinations and their result must 
be approved by the superintendent. 

4. No pupil will be advanced to a higher class except 
upon the satisfactory completion of the work of the prece- 
ding class. All tests and examination questions shall be first 
approved by the superintendent, and no promotion to a high- 
er class shall be valid except approved by the superintendent. 

5. The school year shall consist of eight months of 
twenty school days each. No holidays except Thanksgiving 
Day, Christmas Day and New Year's Day shall be given. A 
Christmas recess not exceeding ten days may be given, but 




< pq 



such recess shall not be included in the school year of 160 
days. 

6. Three unexcused absences or tardies during the 
year shall cause any pupil to be suspended from school for 
the remainder of the year. The principal will not accept any 
excuse for tardiness or absence except the serious sickness of 
the pupil or his immediate family. 

7. No substitute teacher shall be employed, except upon 
the approval of the superintendent, and no student shall be 
permitted to teach any normal class. 

8. All students who receive free tuition shall sign a 
pledge to teach two years in the colored public schools of the 
State. 

9. The satisfactory completion of the work of the 
fifth grade of the elementary school as set forth in the 
State Course of Study will be required for entrance on the 
work of the normal course of study. 

BEGINNING OF SESSION 1908-'09. 

The session of 1908-'09 will begin at Fayetteville on Sep- 
tember 14, 1908. 



COURSES OE STUDY. 



PREPARATORY COURSE. 

This course will contain such subjects as are generally 
included under fifth grade work. All students to enter the 
Normal Course of Study must pass a satisfactory examina- 
tion in all the branches of the Preparatory Course, or their 
equivalent. 

1. Reading .- 

a. Phonics (spelling, writing, diacritical marks): Foust 
& Griffin N. C. Spelling Book, pp. 1-100, including the words 
found in the reading and other subjects of study. 

h. Longfellow's Song of Hiawatha, Francillon's Gods 
and Heroes, Ruskin's King of the Golden River, Hawthorne's 
The Great Stone Face. 

2. Language : 

a. The Story (oral and written). 

b. Copying and dictation by sentences and paragraphs. 
The copying and dictation must not take the sentence out of 
its place in the paragraph. The relation of sentence and 
paragraph must be retained in all the work. Use the read- 
ers as the basis of the work. 

_ c. Hyde's Lessons 1, for formal work, omitting all com- 
position and picture lessons. 

3. Drawing and Writing : 

a. Use Webb and Ware's Practical Drawing Course. 
The pupils are not simply to draw lines, but learn to draw 
real things, using lines. 

b. Book 2 should be taken up after Book 1 has been 
completed. 

4. Arithmetic. 

a. Review notation and numeration; formal addition, 
subtraction, multiplication, and division of whole numbers 
and fractions, and take up : 

b. Decimals, compound quantities and percentage, using 
Colaw and Duke's Intermediate, pp. 1-192. Teachers should 
own Werner Arithmetic 2. 

5. History : 

a. Study White's Beginner's History of United States. 



b. Study — Colonies. The teacher will take up the study 
of the Colonies after plan of Guerber's Story of the Thirteen 
Colonies. 

6. Geography : 

a. Home Geography. Teachers will follow plan of Tarr 
and McMurry's Geography 1. 

b. Pupils must study the life histories of a number of 
common plants and animals by means of the school garden. 

c. Use Maury's Elementary Geography to give pupils 
an idea of the world as a whole. Teachers should own Tarr 
and McMurray's Geography 1. 

7. Science: 

Culler's First Book. 
Cooking, Sewing. 

NORMAL COURSE. 
first year. 
Reading : 

a. Phonics (spelling, writing): N. C. Spelling Book, pp. 
100 to end. 

h. Clark's Story of Troy, Guerber's Story of the Greeks, 
Warren's Stories from English History. 

Language : 

a. Story (oral and written); copying and dictation. 

b. Study Smith's Our Language, book second. 

Arithmetic : 

Milne's Progressive Arithmetic, book three. 

History: 

a. Hansell's Higher United States History. 

b. Prominent Biographers. 

Geography : 

Maury's Complete Geography. 

Vocal Music. 
Drawing : 

Webb & Ware's Practical Drawing Course. 
Science : 

Physiology, Agriculture, Cooking and Sewing. (Use 
Culler's Second Book of Physiology.) 



second year. 
Reading : 

a. Phonics (spelling and writing) : Hunt's Spelling 
Book, part 2. 

b. Irving's Knickerbocker Stories, Guerber's Story of 
the Romans; Selections, Whittier and Holmes. 
Language : 

a. The Story (oral and written); copying and dictation. 

b. English Grammar. 
Arithmetic : 

Milne's Progressive Arithmetic— Book three. 
History : 

a. Hansell's Higher United States History, completed. 

b. Hill's N. C. History, second term. 
Vocal Music. 

Civil Government : 

Peele's Civil Government. 
Drawing : 

Webb & Ware's Practical Course. 
Geography : 

Maury's Complete, completed. 
Science : 

Physiology, Agriculture, Cooking and Sewing. (Use 
Culler's Third Book of Physiology.) 

third year. 
English : 

a. Literature : Moulton's Bible Stories, Cook's Story of 
Ulysses, McMurray's Robinson Crusoe, Pratt's Legend of the 
Red Children, Baldwin's Fairy Stories and Fables, C. Clax- 
ton's Grimm's Fairy Stories, Holbrook's Hiawatha Primer. 

Note. — These books on literature are read at this point 
with special reference to teaching the same. 

b. English Grammar and Composition. : 

c. Spelling and Phonetics (Hunt's Spelling, part 2). 
Mathematics: 

a. Arithmetic, Milne's Progressive, completed. 

b. Milne's High School Algebra, second term. 
History : 

Montgomery's Leading-Facts, in English History. 
Drawing : 

Webb & Ware's Drawing Course, 
Vocal Music. 



Geography : 

Tarr's New Physical Geography. 
Latin or Economics : 

a. Collar and DanielL 

L Ely's Outlines. 

c Observation of the work in the Practice School. 
Domestic Science. 

fourth year. 
English : 

a. American Literature, 

b. Rhetoric and Composition. 
Mathematics : 

a Moore and Miner's Practical Business Arithmetic. 
h. Algebra. 
History : 

a. Read Myer's General History. 
Pedagogy : 

c. Methods of Teaching. 

b. School Management. 

c Practice Teaching in the Practice School, grades 1-5. 
Latin : 

Collar and DanielL 
Book-Keeping. 
Science : 

Physiology, Agriculture, Botany, Cooking and Sewing. 

ACADEMIC COURSE. 
JUNIOR year. 

First Half— Algebra or Geometry, General History 
(Myers), English Literature, Latin, Domestic Science, Agri- 
culture, Rhetoric and Composition, Practice Teaching or 
Observation. 

Second Half— Algebra or Geometry, Latin, Pedagogy. 
Elementary Physics, English Literature, Chemistry, Rhetoric 
and Composition, Practice Teaching. 
senior year. 

First Half— Geometry, Ancient History, Rhetoric and 
Composition, Latin, School Management, Elementary Physics. 

Second Half — Geometry, Rhetoric and Grammar, Ped- 
agogy, History of Education, Psychology, Latin, Ethics, Prac- 
tice Teaching. 

Note. — The above course of study may be varied, if circumstances 
demand it, and if approved by the Superintendent. 



PUPILS 19G7-'08. 



FIRST-YEAR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS. 



Names of Students. 


Age. 


County. 


Byrd, Bertha J 


21 
17 
19 
24 
15 
22 
22 
28 
15 
19 
18 
19 




















McKoy, Pinky 




McMillan, George W 








Waddell, Minnie U 








Williams, Geo. H 




Williams, Wayman W 








FOURTH YEAR STUDENTS. 




17 
20 
19 
19 
18 
19 
35 
18 
19 
22 
16 
18 
16 
26 
23 
19 
















Bethea, Thos. J 






S. C. 






Caple, Mary K 














Texas 




Lee 




Bladen 










Smith, Carrie L 


Harnett 



11 



FOURTH YEAR STUDENTS— Continued. 



Names of Students. 


Age. 


County. 




25 
18 
25 
19 
15 
22 








Smith, Mary E 












Williams, Wiley P 









THIRD YEAR STUDENTS. 



Bethea, Sarah E „ 


21 
17 
14 
17 
16 
13 
15 
26 
28 
22 
23 
15 
16 
18 
28 
19 
18 
18 
13 
18 
15 
16 
20 
29 
20 
17 


Marion Co., 

S. C. 
Bladen 


Brown, Petty L 


Bladen 


Bryant, Mabel C 


















Bladen 






Drake, W. D 




Elliott, Carrie L 








Locke, Esther J _ 


Cumberland 






McMillan, O.C 


Bladen 






















Mitchell, Mary C 
















Thames, John R 


Cumberland 



12 



THIRD YEAR STUDENTS— Continued, 





Names of Students. 


Age. 


County. 




16 
19 

15 




Williams, Geo. W 




Williams, Katie M 









SECOND YEAR STUDENTS. 



Adams, Lilly M 


20 
15 
25 
18 
21 
14 
14 
17 
16 
24 
21 
16 
19 
16 
21 
18 
16 
17 
19 
16 
15 
14 
15 
17 
13 
19 
17 
21 








Avant, Lena A 


Lee 


Avant, Whitted 




Black W. A 




Blackman, Maggie B. . . 




Boon, Jame3 H 




Boon, Mary 




Boon, Spicy A 




Brewington, Julius F . . 




Brewington, Lilly C 




Brown, Lilly 

Bryant, Maggie D 


Scotland 
Cumberland 


Caple, Sarah A 




Carver, Henrietta ^ 

Carver, Wm. W 


Cumberland 






Dunn, Clarence W 


Cumberland 


Elliott, Florence 


Cumberland 


Fisher, Annie 


Cumberland 


Floyd, Julia M 




Freeman, Maud M 


Cumberland 


Gillespie, Emma.. .. 


Cumberland 


Holliday, G. D... 


Cumberland 


Hoover, Pearl L 


Guilford 


Hughes, Delilah J 


Cumberland 




Cumberland 


Hughes, W.J : 


Cumberland 



13 



SECOND YEAR— Continued. 



Names of Students. 


Age. 


County. 


Hurst, Lilly 


14 
21 
19 
18 
19 
17 
18 
16 
24 
21 
39 
16 
16 
14 
18 
16 
17 
16 
27 
16 
16 
16 
15 
18 
17 
22 
13 
20 
15 
17 
18 
18 












Kelly, Robert 
















McKella, Meta 




























Monroe, Walter R 












Pickett, Helen 






Bladen 




Bladen 




Bladen 






























Walker, Esther 




Walker, Janie B 








Williams Rosanna _ 


Cumberland 



14 



FIRST YEAR STUDENTS. 



Names of Students. 



Anderson, Isabella 
Baldwin, Edward ... 
Beatty, Minnie C.„. 

Beatty, Sophia 

Blackman, Thos. L 
Blalock, Louise II .. 

Brown, Evelina 

Bryant, Nannie S... 

Burney, Geo. W 

Carver, Nellie A- 

Chandler, Robt. N.. 

Colvin, J. H 

Council, Annie 

Council, Carrie 

Council, Hattie 

Dunham, Mary E... 

Elliott, Julia C 

Evans, Georgie.„ 

Evans, Hattie R 

Evans, Mary D 

Evans, Selina 

Evans, Susie 

Freeman, Mary L... 

Gillis, Lemuel 

Goodman, James R. 

Hatcher, Tera 

Hill, Susie 

Hill, Sylvester. 

Hurst, Maceo 

Kelly, OthanieL 

King, Marie L 

Lomax, Lillie B 

Lomax Nina 

Love, Elvira - 



County. 

Cumberland 

Robeson 

Cumberland 

Cumberland 

Cumberland 

Johnson 

Cumberland 

Cumberland 

Bladen 

Cumberland 

Cumberland 

Bladen 

Cumberland 

Cumberland 

Cumberland 

Bladen 

Cumberland 

Cumberland 

Cumberland 

Cumberland 

Cumberland 

Cumberland 

Cumberland 

Cumberland 

Robeson 

Cumberland 

Chatham 

Chatham 

Pender 

Cumberland 

Cumberland 

Cumberland 

Cumberland 

Scotland 



15 



FIRST YEAR STUDENTS-Continued. 



Names of Students. 


Age. 


County. 




16 
14 
16 
17 
15 
17 
14 
17 
17 
16 
14 
15 
18 
18 
18 
14 
13 
18 
16 
15 
15 
15 
15 
18 
18 
17 
17 
17 
26 
19 
17 
16 
15 
16 




















McKoy, Katie L 
























McRay, Martha J.. ..... ... 








































Robinson, Nathan 

Rowland, Whitford _ 


Cumberland 






Smith, T. W 






















Harnett 






Tucker, Florrie M 








West, Connie 


Cumberland 



16 



FIRST YEAR STUDENTS— Continued. 





Number of Students. 


Age. 


County. 




14 
13 

14 
13 




Winn, Nellie G 




Wood, Lillie 















SUMMARY OF ENROLLMENT. 



Number of males enrolled in High School 4 

Number of females " " " " , 9 

Number of males enrolled in Normal Department 48 

Number of females " " " 134 

Number of males enrolled in Practice School 12 

Number of females " " " " 20 

Total number enrolled in Normal and High School 195 

Total number enrolled in Practice School 32 

Grand total enrolled in Normal and Practice Schools 227 

AVERAGE ATTENDANCE. 

First month— average attendance 63 

Second month— average attendance 78 

Third month— average attendance 114 

Fourth month— average attendance 124 

Fifth month— average attendance 128 

Sixth month— average attendance 114 

Seventh month— average attendance 95 

Eighth month— average attendance 85 

Daily average attendance of Normal and High School Students for the session of 

eight months was 100 



17 



Where the Students Came From. 



The students in attendance upon the school during the 
session came from three different States, thirteen counties, 
forty-one post-offices, one hundred and thirteen different 
families. Ninety-six of these families own their homes. 

WHAT THEIR PARENTS OR GUARDIANS FOLLOW. 

The parents or guardians of one hundred and twenty- 
four of the students are farmers ; those of nine are laborers ; 
of eight, laundresses ; of six, merchants ; of five, carpenters ; 
of three, brickmasons ; of two, blacksmiths ; of two, physi- 
cians ; of two, mail carriers ; of two, pilots ; of two, painters. 
The parents of the others are plumbers, barbers, coopers, 
foreman at silk mill, drivers and general house work, etc. 

PRESENT EVERY DAY. 

Fourteen different students were present every day 
during the session. Thirty-five others were not absent a 
day after entering school. Tardiness was reduced to a min- 
imum. 



18 



Location. 

Forty acres of land, situated about a half mile northwest 
of the city limits, was purchased and deeded to the State in 
August, 1907, as a permanent site for the school. The land 
is elevated, somewhat rolling, and has a beautiful stream of 
water running through it. 

Besides a grove of fine shade trees it contains several 
acres in pear, apple and other fruit trees. The location is 
well nigh an ideal one. 

BUILDINGS. 

Already the State has had erected on this desirable site 
a well-appointed two-story brick administration building. 

Dormitory.— A frame building on the premises, former- 
ly used as a dwelling house, will be renovated and made 
ready for occupancy as a girl's dormitory by the beginning 
of the fall term. Girls will also be accommodated in the 
homes of nearby residents until sufficient accommodation 
can be provided for them on the school premises. 

Arrangements for boarding boys and young men will be 
made with nearby families at reasonable rates. 



Paid Contributions 1905-'08. 

The following sums have been paid toward purchasing a site and 
erecting a building for the Fayetteville Normal School, May, 1905, to 
May, 1908: 

BY COLORED PEOPLE. 

G. W. McMillan, $1; James C. Gill, $5; Dennis Tysor, $1; Rev. J. S. 
Brown, $1 ; W. J. Peacock, $5 ; Fred. Fleming, $5 ; E. N. Williams, $20 ; 
Mrs. Annette Council, $5; Mrs. Rachel McAlister, $5; cash, $1; R. W. 
Thaggard, $2 ; Prof. E. Evans, $5 ; Samuel Hodges, $3 ; Rev. N. B. Dunham, 
$2 ; Rev. J. S. Settle, $5 ; W. H. McNeill, $5 ; C. A. Cogdell, $2 : H. C. Tyson, 
$1 ; E. J. Campbell, $2 ; G. A. P. Wilkerson, $5 ; Joshua Barney, $10 ; S. L. 
McQueen, $5; proceeds concert, $40; proceeds concert, $21; Miss E. W. 
Jacobs, $5 ; Miss E. J. Council, $25 ; Miss I. G. Jacobs, $25 ; Prof. J. F. K. 
Simpson, $13 ; Prof. J. G. Smith, $25 ; E. E. Smith, $50 ; Miss Virginia T. 
Thurston, $2; cash, in different sums, $5; cash collected by E.N.Williams, 
$8.84; A. L. Johnson, $10; J. F. K. Simpson, $12; J. G. Smith, $25; E. E. 
Smith, $50; Rev. N. B. Dunham, $3 ; Rev. T. H. Parnell, $5 ; John Thames, 
$2; H. M.Williams, $1; Samuel Hodges, $5; James Reeves, $2; J.G.Smith, 
$1; Rev. T. A. Purcell, $1; C. H. Gill, $1; H. H. Perry, $1; Ed Smith, $1; 
M. A. Talley, $1; D. T. Watson, $1; Dr. P. N. Melchor, $25; T. H. McNeill, 
$25; E. E. Smith, $25 ; E. N. Williams, $25; F. D. Williston, $25; Students 
of the Normal, by solicitations, $65 ; Magnolia Lodge, No. 6, R. K. of K. D., 
$15 ; Myrtle Lodge, No. 4, K. of P., $15 ; St. James Lodge, Lady Knights 
of K. D., $10; St. Mariam Lodge, No. 125, Lady Knights of K. D., $8; St. 
Mary's Lodge, No. 65, Love and Charity, $10 ; Missionary Baptist Union, 
$10; Eureka Lodge, No. 3, A. F. A. M., $50; Banner Lodge, No. 136, R. K. 
of K. D., $ — ; proceeds from entertainments, $57 ; contributions from oth- 
ers in small sums, $22.75. 

BY WHITE CITIZENS. 

J. W. Ingold, $5; J. B. Starr, 5; A. A. McKethan, 5; Bevil & Vanstory, 
5;E. E. Gorham, 5; H. Lutterloh, 5 ; Bank of Fayetteville, 15; National 
Bank of Fayetteville, 15; F. W. Thornton, 5; W.E.Kindley, 5; Fayettevile 
Furniture Co., 5 ; Mike Folb, 5 ;5 W. F. Blount, 5 ; J. A. Oates, 5 ; S. H. Mac- 
Rae, Esq., 5 ; H. C. Bash, 5 ; Huske Hardware House, 25 ; Cape Fear D. G. 
Co., 5; J. B. Troy, 5; W. H. Marsh, 5; W. M. Walker, 4; R. Burns, 5; The 
Armfield Company, 5; W. M. Martin, 5; J. H. Culbreth & Co., 5; E. H. 
Jennings, 2 ; Fayetteville Ice Company, 5; B. E. Sedberry Sons, 5 ; D. H. 
Ray, 5 ; J. L. Kennedy, 5 ; B. C. Gorham, 5 ; Shuf ord, Rogers & Co., 5 ; A. P. 
Johnson, 5; W. L. Hawley, 1; A. H. Slocomb, 1; J. C. Gorham, 1; A. L. 
McCaskill, 1; J. M. Goddard, 2; W. T. Saunders, 1; L. C. Wooten, 1; J. M. 
Lamb, 5 ; John Underwood 25 ; Jerry Respass 25 ; J. R. Boyd, 1 ; J. A. Hol- 
lingsworth, 50 cents. 

SUMMARY OF CONTRIBUTIONS. 

From white citizens $ 266.50 

From colored people 823.59 

Total $1,090.09 

The site of 40 acres cost $3,500. Of this amount the State paid $500. 



STATE COLORED NORMAL SCHOOL, 
FAYETTEVILLE. 



HISTORY. 

This institution was established by the State Board of 
Education, under an act of the General Assembly of 1876-77, 
for the training of teachers for the colored public schools of 
the State. It has completed thirty-one school years of from 
eight to ten months each, in which 1,749 different pupils 
from 73 counties of the State have been enrolled. Three 
hundred and twenty-eight (328) have completed the pre- 
scribed course of study. Of this number only a few have 
failed to engage in teaching. 

NATURE AND DESIGN. 

A normal school is neither a college, a law, nor a theo- 
logical school, but a school for the thorough instruction and system- 
atic training of students who wish to become teachers ; hence the 
design of this school is— 

I. Thorough instruction in all the branches required to 
be taught in the public schools of the State ; 

II. The best methods of teaching these branches and 
governing the schools, and 

III. The cultivation of the habit of thinking clearly and 
systematically, and the practice of delivering the thoughts 
and explanations in a lucid and pleasant manner. To accom- 
plish this our course of study, practice in teaching, library, 
and rhetorical exercises are admirably adapted. 

QUALIFICATIONS OF A GOOD TEACHER. 

1. Good health, good common sense, and sound judg- 
ment. 

2. A thorough knowledge of the branches he proposes 
to teach. 

3. Aptness to teach. He may be rich in knowledge, 



21 

but it will be of little value to his pupils unless he has the 
skill of communicating it. 

4. Perfect self-control. He cannot govern others when 
unable to govern himself. 

5. Love for his calling. Any work is easily done when 
prompted by love. Whatever one does willingly is no trouble. 

EXAMINATIONS. 

Oral and written examinations of all the students will 
be held during the first week of each term, and public exam- 
ination and exhibition annually, at the close of the session. 

SOCIETIES. 

The Normal Literary Society, which meets Friday eve- 
ning of each week, and the Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A., 
which meets monthly, are societies formed among the stu- 
dents and subject to their own control, under the supervis- 
ion of the teachers. They are excellent means for drill in 
parliamentary usage, and business habits. 

NON-SECTARIAN. 

The school is not conducted in the interest of any reli- 
gious denomination or any political party. The teachers 
belong to different churches, and students, while expected 
to attend some church are allowed to make their own choice. 
All the leading denominations are represented by churches 
in town. 

APPLICATIONS FOR TEACHERS. 

There are usually connected with the school, or in cor- 
respondence with the faculty, persons well qualified to teach, 
and willing to accept suitable positions when offered. All 
letters in reference to teachers, etc., will be promptly an- 
swered, and, if applications are definite enough, teachers 
can generally be supplied. 

Applications should state : 

1. Male or female teacher required. 

2. Grade of certificate required. 

3. Beginning and length of term. 

4. Salary and price of board. 



22 

The work under this head is all done as a matter of 
courtesy, and although no charge is made to either commit- 
tee or teachers, no effort will be spared to send the right 
teacher to the right place. 

ADVICE TO THOSE WHO WISH TO ENTER THE SCHOOL. 

1. Carefully examine the course of study and decide 
how much of it you have thoroughly accomplished, recogni- 
zing always the difference between the knowledge required 
by a teacher and by one who is merely expecting to become 
a general scholar. 

2. Do not be too anxious to enter advanced classes. 
There will be little or no time in any class to make up back 
studies. Many who are admitted to the advanced classes 
fail to do the work well, from lack of elementary training, 
and regret not having begun to work here in lower grades. 

3. Bring with you, as useful for study or reference, all 
the text-books you have. 

4. Come expecting to work faithfully and honestly— to 
make study your first and only aim while here. If you can- 
not come with this spirit, or if you lack the determination to 
carry you through in this spirit, you make a mistake in 
entering a normal school. 

DISCIPLINE. 

In a normal school there should be no need of reference 
to the matter of discipline. Only those should come, or be 
admitted, who have well-formed, correct habits. 

This is, in no sense, a reform school, and young men or 
women who are not disposed to submit willingly and cheer- 
fully to all the wholesome restraints found necessary for the 
good working and good reputation of the school will be 
unhesitatingly dismissed. 

We are, in a measure, responsible to the State for the 
character and equipment of each pupil graduated from the 
school. This being the case, we are compelled to exercise 
the most rigid scrutiny in reference to both these ; and offen- 
ses that in a mere academic institution might be passed over 
lightly, here are viewed rather as indicating the unfitness 



23 

of the offender for taking charge of and training the chil- 
dren of the State. In this way it sometimes happens that 
pupils are advised to withdraw from the school, or are even 
dismissed, when no very serious charges are brought against 
them. They have merely convinced us that they are not 
suitable persons to enter the profession of teaching. No 
publicity is given to such cases. Nor is our action ever ta- 
ken with a view of punishing the offenders. 

Our aim has constantly been to appeal to the nobler na- 
tures of our students in order to secure compliance with the 
regulations of the school. Our rules prohibit what is un- 
gentlemanly or unladylike and disorderly, and require only 
what is necessary to provide for the mental, moral, and 
physical welfare of all.* 

EXPENSES. 

Board per month (payable in advance), boys, $7.00 

girls, 6.50 

Students must bring their own quilts, blankets, sheets, 
pillow cases, towels, combs and brushes, for individual use. 

Students must pay for any damage done to furniture or 
building resulting from carelessness or violence. 

OTHER INFORMATION. 

Information not contained in this catalogue will be 
cheerfully furnished by the Principal, E. E. Smith, Fayette- 
vilie, N. C. 

GENERAL REMARKS. 

The enrollment of the session has been larger than that 
of the previous session. The School enjoys the moral sup- 
port of all classes of the people in the city, community, and 
section. This in itself is an invaluable stimulus to the 
teachers and students in the prosecution of the work under- 
taken. 

While the School has been, throughout the session, 
largely attended, numbers have, by no means, been the ob- 
ject sought or the end in view. The one aim of the teach- 
ers, from beginning to finish, has been thoroughness, 



24 

thoroughness. Carefully conducted reviews have received 
special prominence, from time to time, throughout the ses- 
sion. In carrying out this idea of thoroughness, interest in 
study has awakened, per cent, of attendance has been in- 
creased, and tardiness reduced to a minimum. 

This new awakening, this increased interest and effi- 
ciency generally in the work of the School is largely, if not 
altogether, due to the wise and helpful supervision of the 
superintendent of the State Colored Normal Schools. 

The School is open to inspection at all times, and teachers 
and friends of education are cordially invited to visit the 
school at their convenience. 

We will have our new school building in readiness for 
occupancy at the beginning of the fall term of the present 
year. 

For further information address the Principal. 

E. E. Smith, 
Fayetteville, N. C. 

Next session begins September 14, 1908. 



The Judge-Garrett Printing Company, 

Book and Commercial Printers, 

Fayetteville, N. C. 



p 



'833 



S& 







ue 



3® 



Catalogue of the 

Thirty-Second Annual 
Session 

Nitrify (Earnta 

i>iaf ? (Enters 

Normal 

^rt|0ol 

Fayetteville, North Carolina 



m 







4J*-' 



Th 



Scholastic Year 1908-1909 

with Announcements 

and Statistics 



THIRTY-SECOND ANNUAL CATALOGUE 



NORTH CAROLINA 



State Colored Normal School 



1908-'09. 



FAYLTTLVILLL, N. C 



FAYETTEVILLE : 

The Judge Printing Company, Book and Job Printers. 

1909. 



CONTENTS, 



State Board of Education. 

Superintendent of the State Colored Normal School. 

Local Board of Managers. 

Faculty. 

Calendar. 
General Information — History — Location — Buildings — Some Urgent Needs 
of the School — Contributions and Contributors — A Student's Crop — School 
Gardens — Board — Tuition — Regulations — Nature and Design — Qualifications 
of a Good Teacher — Examinations — Societies— Applications for Teachers- 
Advice to those who wish to enter the School — Discipline. 
Courses Offered. 



Model or Practice School. 

Class List of 1908-'09. 

Graduates — Where Students Come From — Occupation of Parents. 

Other Information. 

Some facts about Public Colored Schools of the State. 



State Board of Education. 



W. W. Kitchin, Governor, President. 

J. Y. Joyner, Superintendent Public Instruction, Secretary 

Wm. C. Newland, Lieutenant-Governor. 

J. Bryan Grimes, Secretary of State. 

B. R. Lacy, Treasurer. 

T. W. Bickett, Attorney-General. 

B. F. Dixon, Auditor. 



J. A. Bivins, Superintendent of State Colored and Croatan Normal 
Schools and Director of Teacher Training, of North Carolina. 



Local Board of Managers. 



Hon. H. L. Cook, Hon. Q. K. Nimocks, 

Dr. H. W. Lilly, Prof. C. L. Brogden. 

Prof. J. A. McAllister, Hon. N. A. Smith. 



Officers of the Board. 



Hon. H. L. Cook, Chairman ; 
Dr. H. W. Lilly, Treasurer ; 
Hon. Q. K. Nimocks, Secretary. 



Faculty 1908~'09. 



E. E. Smith, A. B., Ph. D., Shaw University, Principal, 
Pedagogy and Science. 

Rev. J. G. Smith, St. Augustine, 
History and Geography. 

Miss M. M. Roberts, Shaw University, 
Mathematics. 

Miss M. L. Brooks, Oberlin College, 
English and Latin. 

Miss M. A. Blackman, Hampton, 
Domestic Science and Music. 



Faculty for 1 909--' 10. 



E. E. Smith, Ph. D., Principal, 
Agriculture, Pedagogy, Civil Government. 

Chas. M. Worth, A. B., 
Mathematics. 

Florence McNeill, A. B., 
English and Latin. 

J. G. Smith, 
History, Geography. 



Domestic Science and Music. 



Practice School. 



Calendar. 



SCHOOL YEAR, EIGHT MONTHS. 

13th September, Monday, - Session Opens. 

" " - Entrance Examination of New Students. 

14th " Tuesday, - Registration and Assignment to Work 

25th November, Thursday, Thanksgiving Day. 
23d December, Thursday, Christmas Holiday begins at 4:00 P. M. 
1910.— 

1st January, Saturday, Emancipation Day. 
3d January, Monday, Christmas Holiday ends at 8:40 A. M. 



STATE COLORED NORMAL SCHOOL, 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 



History. 

This institution was established in Fayetteville by the 
State Board of Education, under an Act of the General 
Assembly of 1876-77, for the Training of Teachers for the 
Colored Public Schools of the State. It has completed thirty- 
two school years of from eight to ten months each, in which 
have been enrolled 1,841 different students from 74 Counties 
of the State. Of these, three hundred and twenty-nine have 
completed the prescribed course of study. The graduates 
of the school have all engaged in teaching in the public 
schools of the State, at least for a time, with very few 
exceptions. 

Location. 

For more than twenty-five years the school was con- 
ducted in the Howard School Building on Gillespie street in 
the historic City of Fayetteville. 

Forty acres of land, situated about a half mile north- 
west of the city limits were purchased and deeded to the 
State in August, 1907, as a permanent home site for the 
school. The site overlooks the city, being one of the beauti 
ful elevations which surround it. 

The school property is most desirably environed, being 
bordered on the east by one of the rapidly flowing branches 
of the famous Cross Creek ; on the north by a branch line 
of the Atlantic Coast Line Railway — just across which is the 
Normal Annex, a growing village ; on the west by a county 
road, and on the north-west by a prospective colored settle- 
ment. Already, since locating the school in its new and per- 
manent home, scores of new buildings have been erected in 
the vicinity. 

Besides, abundant natural grown oak and pine trees, 



FAYETTEVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA. 7 

which suggest the future park, and a beautiful grove of 
majestic shade trees, which adorn the campus, there are 
numerous terraced walk and drive-ways winding here and 
there through the campus. There are also hundreds of 
pear, apple, and other fruit trees, on the site. 

Considering its elevated situation, with its forty acres, 
right in the suburbs of the historic Fayetteville, and its de- 
sirable and attractive environments, a better site for the 
location of the school could not have been chosen in this 
section of the State. 

Buildings. 

The main building is a two-story brick structure, cov- 
ered with slate. The basement is commodious, and is used 
for the department of Domestic Science. The building was 
completed in the Summer of 1908. 

DORMITORY. 

In addition to the frame buildings which were used for 
dormitories last session, it is the purpose of the authorities 
to have another brick building erected by the beginning of 
next session — September 13th — for girls' dormitory. 

Accommodations for boys and young men will be pro- 
vided, in frame buildings. 

Some Urgent Needs of the School. 

Perhaps the greatest need of the school at this time is 
a dormitory that will accommodate 125 girls, and one that 
will room 60 boys. 

The patrons and friends of the school have, all the 
while, manifested a willingness to help and assist the work, 
as the following contributions made during the year to the 
site purchasing fund will show. 

CONTRIBUTIONS AND CONTRIBUTORS. 

Dr. P. N. Melchor, $21.10; T. H. McNeill, $21.10; E. N. 
Williams, $21.10; S. T. Evans, $7.00; F. D. Williston, $4.60; 



8 STATE COLORED NORMAL SCHOOL 

E. E. Smith, $15. M. Stevens, $2.50; C. G. Avant, $1.50; C. 
H.Hodges, $2.50; Friends, through L. H. Bizzell, $37.14; 
Mrs. Geo. H. Brown, $1.00; Mrs. Jerry Andrews, $1.00; 

Mrs. W. D. McDaniel, $1.00: Miss Gillespie, $1.00; E. E. 

Smith, $11 ; Entertainments, $37.40 ; Sam'l Dees, 25c.; E. E. 
Smith, $14.00. 

White— J. R. Tolar, $5; J. Sprunt Newton, $5; D. H. 
Ray, $5 ; Mrs. Folb, $2 ; Shuford & Rogers, $2 ; Fayetteville 
Furniture Store, $2. 

A Student's Crop. 

There are some twenty-five acres of cleared land be- 
longing to the school, and immediately surrounding the 
campus. On a part of this cleared land O. C. McMillan, a 
third year student, cultivated crops during 1908 that pro- 
duced 156 bushels of corn, 1,600 bundles of fodder, 3,500 
pounds of pea-vine hay, 30 bushels of peas, and 25 bushels 
of sweet potatoes. 

These crops were gathered, measured, and housed by 
students after the session of school opened. A bale of cotton, 
weighing something over 400 pounds, was also produced. 

School Gardens. 

An acre of land was set apart for school gardens. It 
was divided and laid off into small sections, giving to each 
student, who desired, a section. The interest manifested by 
those taking garden plats was very gratifying, in that they 
exhibited much rivalry in preparing the seed beds, as well 
as selecting the different kinds of seed. This gives them 
something of an opportunity to put into practice the things 
learned in the school room. 



FAYETTEVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA. V 

Board. 

Board, in the dormitory, per month of 4 weeks, $5.00 

Room rent and bed, - - .75 

Fuel and lights, ----- .75 

All bills payable in advance. 

Students will provide themselves with sheets, spreads, 
towels, etc., etc. 

Tuition. 

Tuition in the normal school is free to those who in- 
tend to teach in the colored public schools of North Carolina. 
Those who do not intend to teach must pay $1.00 per month 
tuition. The school is sustained for the purpose of training 
teachers for the elementary public schools. It is only just 
and right that those who take advantage of the school and 
who do not intend to teach, shall pay the tuition charges. 

All pupils must pay a contingent fee of $1.00 in ad- 
vance. Graduates will have to pay $1.00 for diploma. 

Regulations. 

The following regulations govern the school : 

1. Pupils of both sexes are to be admitted, but all 
boarding pupils must consult the principal before making 
any arrangements for boarding outside the school dormitories. 

2. Only pupils of good moral character will be ad- 
mitted or retained in the school. 

3. No pupil will be admitted to the school after the 
opening week, except upon examination, which examination 
will cover the previous work of the class to which admission 
is sought. All such examinations and their result must be 
approved by the superintendent. 

4. No pupil will be advanced to a higher class except 
upon the satisfactory completion of the work of the preced- 
ing class. All tests and examination questions shall be first 
approved by the superintendent, and no promotion to a 



10 STATE COLORED NORMAL SCHOOL, 

higher class shall be valid except approved by the superin- 
tendent. 

5. The school year shall consist of eight months of 
twenty school days each. No holidays except Thanksgiving 
Day, Christmas Day and New Year's Day shall be given. A 
Christmas recess not exceeding ten days may be given, but 
such recess shall not be included in the school year of 160 
days, 

6. Three unexcused absences or tardies during the 
year shall cause any pupil to be suspended from school for 
the remainder of the year. The principal will not accept 
any excuse for tardiness or absence except the serious sick- 
ness of the pupil or his immediate family. 

7. No substitute teacher shall be employed, except 
upon the approval of the superintendent, and no student 
shall be permitted to teach any normal class. 

8. All students who receive free tuition shall sign a 
pledge to teach two years in the colored public schools of 
the State. 

9. The satisfactory completion of the work of the fifth 
grade of the elementary school as set forth in the State 
Course of Study will be required for entrance on the work 
of the normal course of study. 

Nature and Design. 

A normal school is neither a college, a law, nor a theo- 
logical school, but a school for the thorough instruction and system- 
atic training of students who wish to become teachers ; hence the 

design of this school is — 

I. Thorough instruction in all the branches required to 
be taught in the public schools of the State ; 

II. The best methods of teaching these branches and 
governing the schools, and 

III. The cultivation of the habit of thinking clearly 
and systematically, and the practice of delivering the 
thoughts and explanations in a lucid and pleasant manner. 



PAYETTEVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA. 11 

To accomplish this our course of study, practice in teaching, 
library, and rhetorical exercises are admirably adapted. 

Qualifications of a Good Teacher. 

1. Good health, good common sense, and sound judg- 
ment. 

2. A thorough knowledge of the branches he proposes 
to teach. 

3. Aptness to teach. He may be rich in knowledge, 
but it will be of little value to his pupils unless he has the 
skill of communicating it. 

4. Perfect self-control He cannot govern others when 
unable to govern himself. 

5. Love for his calling. Any work is easily done when 
prompted by. love. Whatever one does willingly is no 
trouble. 

Examinations. 

Oral and written examinations of all the students will 
be held during the first week of each term, and public ex- 
amination and exhibition annually, at the close of the session. 

Societies. 

The Normal Literary Society, which meets Friday even- 
ing of each week, and the Y, M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A., which 
meets monthly, are societies formed among the students and 
subject to their own control, under the supervision of the 
teachers. They are excellent means for drill in parliament- 
ary usage and business habits. 

Applications for Teachers, 

There are usually connected with the school, or in cor- 
respondence with the faculty, persons well qualified to teach, 



12 STATE COLORED NORMAL SCHOOL, 

and willing to accept suitable positions when offered. All 
letters in reference to teachers, etc., will be promptly an- 
swered, and, if applications are definite enough, teachers can 
generally be supplied. 

Applications should state : 

1. Male or female teacher required. 

2. Grade of certificate required. 

3. Beginning and length of term. 

4. Salary and price of board. 

The work under this head is all done as a matter of 
courtesy, and although no charge is made to either commit- 
tee or teachers, no effort will be spared to send the right 
teacher to the right place. 

Advice to Those Who Wish to Enter the School. 

1. Carefully examine the course of study and decide 
how much of it you have thoroughly accomplished, recogniz- 
ing always the difference between the knowledge required 
by a teacher and by one who is merely expecting to become 
a general scholar. 

2. Do not be too anxious to enter advanced classes. 
There will be little or no time in any class to make up back 
studies. Many who are admitted to the advanced classes 
fail to do the work well, from lack of elementary training, 
and regret not having begun to work here in lower grades. 

3. Bring with you, as useful for study or reference, all 
the text-books you have. 

4. Come expecting to work faithfully and honestly — to 
make study your first and only aim while here. If you can- 
not come with this spirit, or if you lack the determination to 
carry you through in this spirit, you make a mistake in 
entering a normal school. 

Discipline. 

In a normal school there should be no need of reference 
to the matter of discipline. Only those should come, or be 
admitted, who have well-formed, correct habits. 



FAYETTEVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA. 13 

This is, in no sense, a reform' school, and young men or 
women who are not disposed to submit willingly and cheer- 
fully to all the wholesome restraints found necessary for the 
good working and good reputation of the school will be 
unhesitatingly dismissed. 

We are, in a measure, responsible to the State for the 
character and equipment of each pupil graduated from the 
school. This being the case, we are compelled to exercise 
the most rigid scrutiny in reference to both these ; and offen- 
ses that in a mere academic institution might be passed over 
lightly, here are viewed rather as indicating the unfitness 
of the offender for taking charge of and training the chil- 
dren of the State. In this way it sometimes happens that 
pupils are advised to withdraw from the school, or are even 
dismissed, when no very serious charges are brought against 
them. They have merely convinced us that they are not 
suitable persons to enter the profession of teaching. No 
publicity is given to such cases. Nor is our action ever 
taken with a view of punishing the offenders. 

Our aim has constantly been to appeal to the nobler 
natures of our students in order to secure compliance with 
the regulations of the school. Our rules prohibit what is 
ungentlemanly or unladylike and disorderly, and require 
only what is necessary to provide for the mental, moral, and 
physical welfare of all. 

Courses Offered. 

Preparatory Course, Normal Course, Academic Course, 
Model or Practice School Course, Industrial Course, Agri- 
culture, Cooking and Household Economy, Sewing. 



14 STATE COLORED NORMAL SCHOOL, 

Courses of Study. 



PREPARATORY COURSE. 

This course will contain such subjects as are generally included under 
fifth grade work. All students to enter the normal course of study must 
pass a satisfactory examination in all the branches of the preparatory 
course, or their equivalent. 

1. READING: 

a. Phonics (spelling, writing, diacritical marks); Foust & Griffin N. 
C. Spelling Book, pp. 1-100, including the words found in the reading and 
other subjects of study. 

b. Longfellow's Song of Hiawatha, Francillon's Gods and Heroes, 
Ruskin's King of the Golden River, Hawthorne's The Great Stone Face. 

2. LANGUAGE: 

a. The Story (oral and written). 

b. Copying and dictation by sentences and paragraphs. The copying 
and dictation must not take the sentence out of its place in the paragraph. 
The relation of sentence and paragraph must be retained in all the work. 
Use the readers as the basis of the work. 

c. Hyde's Lesson's I, for formal work, omitting all composition and 
picture lessons. 

3. DRAWING AND WRITING : 

a. Use Webb and Ware's Practical Drawing Course. The pupils are 
not simply to draw lines, but learn to draw real things, using lines. 

b. Book 2 should be taken up after Book 1 has been completed. 

4. ARITHMETIC: 

a. Review notation and numeration ; formal addition, subtraction, 
multiplication, and division of whole numbers and fractions, and take up: 

b. Decimals, compound quantities and percentage, using Colaw and 
Duke's Intermediate, pp. 1-192. Teachers should own Werner Arith- 
metic 2. 

5. HISTORY: 

a. Study White's Beginner's History of United States. 

b. Study— Colonies. The teacher will take up the study of the 
Colonies after plan of Guerber's Story of the Thirteen Colonies. 

6. GEOGRAPHY; 

a. Home Geography. Teachers will follow plan of Tarr and McMur- 
ray's Geography 1. 

b. Pupils must study the life histories of a number of common plants 
and animals by means of the school garden. 



FAYETTEVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA. 15 

c. Use Maury's Elementary Geography to give pupils an idea of the 
world as a whole. Teachers should own Tarr and McMurry's Geography 1. 

7. SCIENCE: 

Cooking, Sewing, Culler's First Book of Physiology. 

NORMAL COURSE. 

FIRST YEAR. 

READING . 

a. Phonics (spelling, writing); N. C. Spelling Book, pp. 100 to end. 

b. Clarke's Story of Troy, Guerber's Story of the Greeks, Warren's 
Stories from English History. 

LANGUAGE : 

a. Story (oral and written) ; copying and dictation. 

b. Study Smith's Our Language, Book second. 

ARITHMETIC: 

Milne's Progressive Arithmetic. Book three. 

HISTORY : 

a. Hansell's Higher United States History. 

b. Prominent Biographers. 

GEOGRAPHY: 

Maury's Complete Geography. 

VOCAL MUSIC. 
DRAWING : 

Webb and Ware's Practical Drawing Course. 

SCIENCE: 

Physiology, Agriculture, Cooking and Sewing. 
(Use Culler's Second Book of Physiology). 

SECOND YEAR. 
READING : 

a. Phonics (spelling and writing) ; Hunt's Spelling Book, part 2. 

b. Irving's Knickerbocker Stories, Guerber's Story of the Romans ; 
Selections, Whittier and Holmes. 

LANGUAGE : 

a. The Story (oral and written) ; copying and dictation. 

b. English Grammar. 

ARITHMETIC : 

Milne's Progressive Arithmetic. Book three. 
HISTORY : 

a. Hansell's Higher United States History, completed. 

b. Hill's N. C. History, second term. 
VOCAL MUSIC. 



16 STATE COLORED NORMAL SCHOOL, 

CIVIL GOVERNMENT: 

Peele's Civil Government. 
DRAWING : 

Webb and Ware's Practical Course. 
GEOGRAPHY : 

Maury's Complete, completed. 
SCIENCE : 

Physiology, Agriculture, Cooking and Sewing. 

(Use Culler's Third Book of Physiology). 

THIRD YEAR. 

ENGLISH : 

a. Literature : Moulton's Bible Stories, Cook's Story of Ulysses, Mc- 
Murray's Robinson Crusoe, Pratt's Legend of the Red Children, Baldwin's 
Fairy Stories and Fables, Claxton's Grimm's Fairy Stories, Holbrook's 
Hiawatha Primer. 

Note : These books on Literature are read at this point with special 
reference to teaching the same. 

b. English Grammar and Composition. 

c. Spelling and Phonetics (Hunt's Spelling, part 2). 
MATHEMATICS : 

a. Arithmetic, Milne's Progressive, completed. 

b. Milne's High School Algebra, second term. 

HISTORY : 

Montgomery's Leading Facts in English History. 

DRAWING : 

Webb and Ware's Drawing Course. 
VOCAL MUSIC. 
GEOGRAPHY : 

Tarr's New Physical Geography. 
LATIN OR ECONOMICS : 

a. Collar and Daniell. 

b. Ely's Outlines. 

c. Observation of the Work in the Practice School. 
DOMESTIC SCIENCE. 

FOURTH YEAR. 
ENGLISH : 

a. American Literature. 

b. Rhetoric and Composition. ; 



FAYETTEVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA. 17 



MATHEMATICS : 

a. Moore and Miner's Practical Business Arithmetic 

b. Algebra. 
HISTORY : 

a. Read Myer's General History. 

PEDAGOGY : 

a. Methods of Teaching. 

b. School Management. 

c. Practice Teaching in the Practice School, grades 1-5, 

LATIN: 

Collar and Daniell. 

BOOKKEEPING. 
SCIENCE: 

Physiology, Agriculture, Botany, Cooking and Sewing. 

ACADEMIC COURSE 

JUNIOR COURSE. 

First Half. 

Algebra or Geometry; General History (Myer's), English Literature: 
Latin ; Domestic Science ; Agriculture ; Rhetoric and Composition ; Practice 
Teaching or Observation, 

Second Half. 

Algebra or Geometry; Latin; Pedagogy; Elementary Physics ; Englsh 
Literature: Chemistry; Rhetoric and Composition; Practice Teaching. 

SENIOR YEAR, 

First Half, 

Geometry; Ancient History; Rhetoric and Composition; Latin; School 
Management; Elementary Physics. 

Second Half. 

Geometry: Rhetoric and Grammar; Pedagogy; History of Education; 
Pyschology ; Latin ; Ethics ; Practice Teaching. 

Note : The above course of study may be varied, if circumstances 
demand it, and if approved by the Superintendent. 

PRACTICE SCHOOL COURSE. 

It is sometimes necessary, on account of the poor preparation of those 
who apply for entrance to the classes of the normal schools, to have a 
good primary school in connection with each normal. It is also necessary 
to have such a school in which candidates for graduation from the normal 



18 STATE COLORED NORMAL SCHOOL, 

schools can be required to teach successfully prior to graduation. There- 
fore, all candidates for graduation will be required to teach in the Practice 
School. 

FIRST GRADE. 

I. SPELLING: 

1. First steps in phonics and writing, as contained In "How to Teach 
Reading (See Part 2). This work will require seven weeks." 

2. A Spelling Book, Part I, taken up at the beginning of the eighth 
week. 

II. READING : 

1. Graded Classics I, begun the tenth week. 

2. Claxton's Grimm's Fairy Stories, or Holbrook's Hiawatha Primer. 
For further suggestions, teachers are referred to "How to Teach 

Reading." 

III. LANGUAGE: 

1. The oral reproduction of stories. 

2. Copying and dictation. 

3. Other formal work — how to write the children's and their parents 
names and post-office address, how to write the days of the week and the 
months of the year, how to write the seasons and the names of the books 
used in the classes; how to write the titles — Mr., Mrs., Miss, Rev., Dr.; and 
how to write a simple letter, in correct form, from dictation. 

For details, teachers are referred to "Suggestions for Language 
Teaching' 

IV. DRAWING; 

a. The children should be permitted to draw the objects they desire 
to draw. 

b. Use Webb and Ware's Drawing I, beginning at the tenth week. 

V. HISTORY: 

The fairy story and the myth are the child's first history stories. The 
first grade reading may, therefore, be considered the first work in history. 

VI. ARITHMETIC: 

1. Learning to count (oral). 

2. Learning to read and write numbers 1-100. 

VII. PHYSIOLOGY. 

1. Care of the teeth and the eyes. 

2. Care of the hair, nails, skin. 

3. Food and Clothing ; fresh air and pure water. 

4. Effects of cigarettes. 

This work should be entirely oral. Teachers will find the above topics 
treated in Culler's Physiology I. 

VIII. GEOGRAPHY: 

1. First step— conception of the great world beyond. 

a. Let the teacher read to the children the Stories in Shaw's Little 



FAYETTEVILL, NORTH CAROLINA 19 

People and Big People of other lands and the following stories from Hol- 
brook's Hiawatha Primer : The Milky Way, p. 40 ; The Fire-Fly, p, 52; The 
Moon, p. 64; The Rainbow, p. 74 ; The Owl, p. 80; Hiawatha's Chickens, 
p. 88; Hiawatha's Brothers, p. 96; Hiawatha's Hunting, pp. 114, 120, 126; 
The Winds, pp. 127-132; Mondamin, pp. 132-134. 

b. Teacher and children make a collection of pictures of the children 
of other lands to show how they live. 

2. The second step — home geography. 

a. Elementary ideas of direction, distance, form, color. 

b. The weather chart. 

For further details, teachers are referred to "Suggestions for Geography 
Teaching." 

IX. AGRICULTURE: 

The introductory work necessary to be done in grades I-IV, before the 
book is taken up, is given somewhat in detail under "Suggestions for 
Teaching Agriculture." 

SECOND GRADE. 

I. SPELLING: 

1. Review the work indicated for First Grade. 

2, A Spelling Book, Part II. 

II. READING: 

1. Graded Classics II. 

2. McMurry's Robinson Crusoe, or Baldwin's Fifty Famous Stories. 
For further suggestions, see "How to Teach Reading." 

III. LANGUAGE: 

1. The oral reproduction of stories. 

2. Copying and dictation. 

3. Other formal work — review the work indicated under this heading 
for first grade and have the children practice writing simple letters of their 
own composition. 

For details of the above work, teachers are referred to "Suggestions 
for Language Teaching." 

IV. DRAWING. 

1. Let the children continue to draw the objects they are interested in. 
Let them try to illustrate some of the stories read to them during the year. 

2. Use Webb and Ware's Drawing II. 

V. HISTORY. 

The work in history is embraced in the reading done during the year. 

VI. ARITHMETIC. 

1. Reading and writing numbers 1-1,000. 

2. The 36 addition facts. 

VII. PHYSIOLOGY. 

See outline of the work for first grade. 



20 STATE COLORED NORMAL SCHOOL 

VIII. GEOGRAPHY. 

1. The first step — conception of the great world beyond. 

a. Teacher reads to the children Andrew's Seven Little Sisters. 

b. Teacher and children make a collection of pictures of the children 
of other lands, to show how they live. 

2. The second step — home geography. 

a. Elementary ideas of direction, distance, color, form. 

b. Weather chart. 

For further details, see "Suggestions for Geography Teaching." 

IX. AGRICULTURE. 

See "Suggestions for Teaching Agriculture." 

THIRD GRADE. 

I. SPELLING. 

1. Review the work indicated for first and second grades. 

2. A Spelling Book, Part III. 

II. READING. 

1. Classics Old and New III. 

2. Cook's Story of Ulysses. 

For further suggestions, see "How to Teach Reading." 

III. LANGUAGE. , 

1. Oral and written reproduction of stories. 

2. Copying and dictation. 

3. Other formal work — Hyde's Language Lessons I, pp. 1-70 to be 
used by the teacher, but not in the hands of the children. 

For details, see "Suggestions for Language Teaching." 

IV. DRAWING. 

1. Let the children try to illustrate some of the stories read to them 
by the teacher during the year. 

2. Use Webb and Ware's Drawing III. 

V. HISTORY. 

The work in history is embraced in the reading done during the year. 

VI. ARITHMETIC. 

1. Formal addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. 

2. Use Colaw and Ellwood's Primary Arithmetic, pp. 109-203. 

VII. PHYSIOLOGY. 

See outline of the work for first grade. 

VIII. GEOGRAPHY. 

1. First step — conception of the great world beyond. 

a. Teacher reads to the children Little Lucy's Wonderful Globe. 

b. Teacher and children locate on a large map or globe North Amer- 
ica and the other continents, the oceans, the United States, North Carolina> 
some of the cities and countries of which they have heard, their own 
county and the nearest-by towns. 



FAYETTEVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA. 21 

2. Second step — home geography. 

a. Elementary ideas of direction, distance, color, form. 

b. Weather chart. 

c. Local occupations, local land and water forms. 

For further details, see "Suggestions for Geography Teaching. 

IX. AGRICULTURE. 

See "Suggestions for Teaching Agriculture." 

X. WRITING. 

1. Begin writing with pen and ink. 

2. Use Copy-book I. 

FOURTH GRADE. 

I. SPELLING. 

1. Review work indicated for first, second, and third grades. 

2. A Spelling Book, Part IV. 

II. READING. 

1. Classics Old and New IV. 

2. Moulton's Bible Stories of the Old Testament. 
For further suggestions, see "How to Teach Reading." 

III. LANGUAGE, 

1. Oral and written reproduction of stories. 

2. Copying and dictation. 

3. Other formal work — Hyde's Language Lessons I, pp. 70-158, in' 
hands of the children. 

For details, see "Suggestions for Language Teaching." 

IV. DRAWING. 

1. Let the children try to illustrate some of the stories read to them 
during the year. 

2. Use Webb and Ware's Drawing IV. 

V. HISTORY. 

1. White's Beginners' U. S. History, pp. 1-32 : Pioneers and Explorers. 

2. Shaw's Discoverers and Explorers, supplementary, to be read by 
the teacher to the children and the stories retold by the children. 

3. Children read the remainder of White's History. 

VI. ARITHMETIC. 

1. Review previous work and teach common fractions. 

2. Use Colaw and Ellwood's Primary Arithmetic, pp. 209-232. 

VII. PHYSIOLOGY. 

See outline of work for first grade. 

VIII. GEOGRAPHY. 

1. Home geography — review of work of previous grades. In addition, 
the teacher should read to the children pp. 1-93 Tarr and McMurry's 
Geography I, asking and requiring the answers to the questions at the end 
of each chapter. This work should embrace the first half of the year. 



22 STATE COLORED NORMAL SCHOOL, 

2. The world as a whole — let the children read in class Maury s 
Elementary Geography — second half year. 

See "Suggestions for Teaching Geography." 

IX. AGRICULTURE. 

See "Suggestions for Teaching Agriculture.'' 

X. WRITING. 

Use Copy-book II. 

INDUSTRIAL DEPARTMENT. 

There is a greater awakening in favor of efficient manual service than 
ever before. Therefore a knowledge of the theory and practice of hand 
work is necessary for the young people who are going out into the world 
expecting success to crown their efforts. 

COURSE IN AGRICULTURE. 

No other subject in the course of study seems to be more thoroughly 
enjoyed by the student body than Agriculture. It brings students into 
touch with the things of nature and supplements their knowledge so that 
they have greater reverence for the Creator, more sympathy for animals, 
and a greater desire for efficiency in service. 

In the Normal Course of Study, Hill's Agriculture is used as a text- 
book. In the Academic Course of Study, Jackson & Daugherty's Agricul- 
ture is used as a text-book. 

COURSE IN COOKING AND HOUSEHOLD ECONOMY. 

There is no vocation in which young women may be more useful than 
in the profession of Domestic Science. Those who qualify for this work 
are greatly in demand as teachers, cooks, and waitresses. They may pre- 
side over their own homes. 

Each class receives instruction in the making of the kitchen fire, 
cleanliness, dish-washing, care of the kitchen, and serving. The instruc- 
tion outlined above is given in conjunction with the preparation of meals 
and the specific cooking of : — 

FIRST YEAR. 

The potato, eggs, cereals, vegetables, meats, fish and breads. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Batters, soups, pastry, meats, fish, salads, breads, warm-over dishes, 
cakes and puddings. 



FAYETTEVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA. 23 

THIRD AND FOURTH YEARS. 

The Third and Fourth year students use as a text-book Williams and 
Fisher's Elements of the Theory and Practice of Cooking. The Third 
year class, pp. 1-143, the Fourth year class will begin on page 144 and con- 
tinue until the book is completed. 

Domestic Science. 

SEWING COURSE. 

FIRST YEAR. 

Basting, combination stitch, shirring, feather stitching, catch stitching. 

Seams: French, French fell, flat fell, overcasting, over-handing> 
making of button holes, and eyelets; sewing on buttons, hooks and eyes' 
darning and patching. 

Aprons, short outing flannel petticoats are made in which all of the 
above work in stiches and seams is used excepting French fell. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Drafting, fitting and making of underwaists and petticoats, tucking, 
different methods of sewing on of inserting, lace and embroidery. 
(Models of each method are made.) 

THIRD YEAR. 

Review second year's work when necessary. 

Drafting, fitting and making of night dresses and undergarments from 
measurements. 

Cutting and making of men's shirts by pattern. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

Drafting, cutting, fitting. Some form of pattern making. Making 
select undergarments from measurements. Making unlined and lined 
dresses and sacques. Advanced work will be taken up when pupils are 
prepared for it. 



24 STATE COLORED NORMAL SCHOOL, 

The Model or Practice School. 

The one essential feature in a well regulated Normal 
School is a properly conducted model school. It is the 
pedagogical laboratory in which the student-teacher observes 
the working of the child-mind and applies the knowledge 
thus gained in carefully planned teaching acts. 

Our model school will not consist of a few pupils selected 
for this special purpose, but it will be a well organized 
graded school, including the first four grades of the elemen- 
tary school. The management and instruction will be under 
the immediate direction of an experienced teacher. This 
will insure a practical, as well as a pedagogical training for 
our students. 

Thus, it will be seen thai the model school is to perform 
two distinct but relative functions : It will be used as a 
Model School for the observat on of expert teaching, and as 
a Practice School for Seniors, who serve an apprenticeship as 
actual teachers. 

The Seniors will be required to devote one hour a day 
to this work. 

Courses will be given in special methods of teaching 
reading, language, arithmetic, geography, and nature study. 
The principles taught will be deduced from class-room 
teaching. Typical lessons will be observed and discussed from 
time to time. The lesson topics will be chosen with refer- 
ence to their concrete application to principles of teaching. 
The aim is to give the students preparing to teach, such 
professional equipment as shall enable them to go into the 
public schools of the State and teach acceptably and well ; 
teach the branches required by law to be taught in the 
free public schools, in a strong way. 



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FAYETTEVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA. 



25 



ROLL OF PUPILS- 1908- 1909. 



School Year, September 14, 1908, May 6, 1909. 
FOURTH YEAR STUDENTS. 



Names of Students. 


bt 


County. 




17 
19 
16 
16 
20 
23 
15 
20 












Waddell, Minnie 








Williams, Wiley P 

















THIRD YEAR. 



Carter, Eliza _. „ 


29 






12 




Cogdell, Mamie L 


17 


Cumberland. 


Elliott, Carrie 


M 






17 






17 






14 




Mitchell, R.F 


26 






20 
16 










16 




Williams, George 


19 


Cumberland. 


Williams, Katie 


16 









SECOND YEAR. 





15 
22 
14 




Black, W. A 




Blackman, MaggeM 


Cumberland. 



26 



STATE COLORED NORMAL SCHOOL, 

SECOND YEAR STUDENTS-Continued. 



Names of Students. 



Brewington, Lillie C. 

Brown, Petiie L. 

Floyd, Julia M 

Freeman, Maud M 

Hoover, Pearl 

Jiggetts, Willie 

Monroe, Walter R 

McAlister, Nancy V ... 

McKeller, Meta 

McKoy, Mamie 

McNair, H. M 

Simmons, Sidney 

Simmons, Pearl I 

Walker, Esther 

Walker, Mamie 

Williams, Hattie 



County. 



21 


Robeson. 


15 


Bladen. 


16 


Cumberland 


14 


Cumberland 


14 


Guilford. 


18 


Robeson. 


18 


Cumberland 


18 


Scotland. 


16 


Cumberland 


17 


Lee. 


19 


Cumberland 


14 


Cumberland 


16 


Cumberland 


15 


Cumberland 


17 


Cumberland. 


18 


Cumberland. 



FIRST YEAR. 



Adams, Margaret .... 

Autry, Lula M 

Boon, Spicie 

Brewington, Julius.. 

Brown, Lillie 

Butler, Vandelia 

Carver, Walter 

Carver, Henrietta .... 

Council, W. L 

Currie, Jettie 

Deas, Iola 

Elliott, Julia C 

Evans, Colon 

Fennell, Rosa 

Harrington, Polk G . 

Henry, Samuel 

Hughes, Delilah 



15 


Cumberland. 


19 


Cumberland. 


17 


Cumberland. 


25 


Robeson. 


17 


Scotland. 


16 


Robeson. 


19 


Cumberland. 


21 


Cumberland. 


23 


Bladen. 


17 


Columbus. 


18 


South Carolina 


15 


Scotland. 


14 


Cumberland. 


25 


Sampson. 


33 


Harnett. 


25 


Columbus. 


20 


Cumberland. 



FAYETTEVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA. 

FIRST YEAR STUDENTS— Continued. 



27 



Names of Students. 



Hughes, Sarah 

Jacobs, John Henry 

Johnson, Lizzie 

Kelly, Robert L 

Lomax, Janie M..._ 

Love, Elvira 

Mack, Adam 

Manning, Sarah J 

Melvin, Edith 

McBryde, Lauretta 

McCormick, Neill Archie . 

McKoy, Mary B 

McMillan, BettieL 

McNair, Aggie 

McNeill, Howard 

McNeill, Mamie 

Patrick, Lewis A 

Pegues, Allena 

Pegues, Nannie 

Robinson, Mary J 

Robinson, Emma 

Smith, Eva Lee 

Smith, T. J 

Tucker, Florrie 

Vincent, Percy 



County. 



17 


Cumberland. 


18 


Cumberland. 


16 


Cumberland. 


19 


Cumberland. 


17 


Cumberland. 


15 


Scotland. 


16 


South Carolina. 


19 


Cumberland. 


16 


Cumberland. 


17 


Cumberland. 


19 


Robeson. 


20 


Cumberland. 


17 


Cumberland. 


17 


Cumberland. 


12 


Cumberland. 


15 


Cumberland. 


17 


Cumberland. 


17 


Scotland. 


17 


Scotland. 


16 


Cumberland. 


15 


Cumberland. 


13 


Wayne. 


20 


Sampson. 


17 


Cumberland. 


15 


Cumberland. 



PREPARATORY. 





15 
16 
15 
12 
13 
16 
12 
15 




Anderson, Isabella 


Cumberland. 










Beatty, Minnie 




Blackman, Thomas . 




Blaylock, Louise 


Johnston. 



28 



STATE COLORED NORMAL SCHOOL, 

PREPARATORY-Oontinued. 



Names of Students. 


< 


County, 




13 
16 
17 
17 
16 
15 
13 
15 
18 
21 
19 
17 
16 
17 
18 
18 
14 
18 
15 
16 
17 
15 
22 
19 
17 
19 
21 
16 
16 
18 
16 
18 
18 
16 
14 
































CoeDock 








Elliott, Florence Olivia 




Elliott Eugenia B 




Elliott, Elisha 




















Kelly, Othaniel 












Mainor, W. J. G. 




























McDonald, Lillie C 




Mclver, Maggie 




McKoy, Katie 




McKoy, Castella 








McNeill, George Ella 








Patridge, Lena M 


Cumberland. 



FAYETTEVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA 



29 



PREPARATORY— Continued . 



• 

Names of Students. 


6 
be 
< 


County. 




18 

15 
20 
12 
15 
13 
18 
18 
13 
17 
12 
15 
15 
17 












Smith, Mabel Y .. 












Smith, Cornelia J 

Smith, Pleasant C j 


Harnett. 






Townsend, Everlena 


Cumberland. 






Wood, Lillie 













30 



STATE COLORED NORMAL SCHOOL, 



THE FOLLOWING IS A LIST OF THE GRADUATES OF THE SCHOOL 
AND THEIR OCCUPATION. 



1878. 



Name. 



A.W.Whitfield 

E. L. Thornton 

Rt. Rev. J. W. Smith 

L.H. Chesnutt 

Mgry E. Harris 

Susan U. (Perry) Chesnutt. 

JaneB. (Perry) Tyson 

Hattie (McNeill) Williams .... 

A. J. Chesnutt, Jr 

John Bayne 

W. H. Quick 

David Bryant 

Geo. H. Williams 

W. H. McNeill 

John Tyson 

Mary E. (Pearce) Cole 

Thos. H. McNeill 

Mary J. (Williams) Smith 

x Jane C. Williams 

H.C.Tyson 

». T. Willi 
inza Davis 
E. Hende: 
W. Willia 
3. Hender: 
ulia (Ochi 

x Deceased. 



Occupation. 



Postoffice. 



Real Estate \ Fayetteville, N. 

Government Clerk i Washington, D. C. 

Bishop A. M. E. Z „. \ Washington, D. C. 

Photographer ; Cleveland, O. 

Teacher I Missisippi. 

Housekeeper Washington, D. C. 

Housekeeper j Washington, D. <'■. 

Housekeeper ! Fayetteville, N. 0. 



1879 



Photographer 



Cleveland, O. 



Attorney Sanford, N. C. 

Steward j New York. 

Mail Carrier Fayetteville, N. C. 

Railway Mail Clerk ! Greensboro. 

j Carthage. 

Housekeeper , Fayetteville. 

Undertaker and Embalmer Fayetteville. 

Housekeeper I Norfolk. 

Teacher.. j Fayetteville. 

Government Clerk | Washington, D. C. 



1880 



Jno. T. Williams 


Physician. 




Charlotte. 










W. E. Henderson 


Business.. 




Salisbury. 


D. W. Williams 


Minister .. 






J. B. Henderson 


Proprietor 


Barber Business 


Fayetteville. 


















FAYETTEVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA. 



31 



GRADUATES— Continued. 
1880 



Name. 


Occupation. 


Postoffice. 








Lina (Pearce) Cole 


Housekeeper 


Fayetteville, N. 0. 


Mary (McLean) Murley 


Housekeeper 


Fayetteville. 























1881 




William Halsey 


Teacher -. 




x J. C. White 


Teacher 


Warsaw. 


Geo. H. Evans 


Undertaker 


Fayetteville. 


x Esther Leach 


Teacher 










Mary K. (Thornton) Bizzell 


Housekeeper 


Fayetteville. 


x Carrie (Perry) Chesnutt 


Housekeeper :. 


Cleveland, 0. 




Physician 









1882 



Edward Williston 

W. T.Tyson 


Physician 


Washington, D. C. 


. 


Teacher 


Halifax, N. C. 


x Louisa Council 




W. T. Chalmers 




Frank Hines 















1883 




Chas. H. Williams 






x Clara. M. Chesnutt 


Teacher . 


Fayetteville. 


C. M. Williams 


Teacher 


Variety Grove. 



1884 







Lizzie Smith 














S7 



32 



STATE COLORED NORMAL SCHOOL, 



GRADUATES— Continued. 
1885 



Name. 



Occupation. 



Eliza Henderson 

Emma J. Council 

Sallie— Elliott— Evans 

Hattie— Armstrong— Williams 

x Katie Perry — Johnson 

x Owen Monk 

Geo. T. Collier 

x Mary Chesnutt 

Mattie— Ochiltree— Adams 

W. S. Hagans 

Augusta — McLean — Sid- 
Clara B.— Freeman— Ta 

Lillian Chesnutt 

A. A. Smith 

W. M. Mitchell 

x M. M. Hines 

E.J.Campbell 

x Virginia— Scott— Willi 
R. McN. Williams 

Sarah— Leary— Melchor 

R. A. Morrisey — 

Mary — Evans — Hoskins 

Charlotte— McNeill— Cain . 

Laura A. Hall 

C. A. Whitehead 

Mary-McNeill-Waddell .. 
x Susie A.— Cain— Mitchell 
E.P.Williams 

x Deceased. 



Postoffice. 



Teacher Fayetteville. 

Teacher „ Fayetteville. 

Housekeeper Fayetteville. 

Housekeeper Fayetteville. 

Housekeeper Philadelphia 

Teacher ! Newton Grove. 

Teacher Georgia. 

Teacher Fayetteville. 

Housekeeper ; Maxton. 



1886 



W. S. Hagans 




Planter 




Augusta — McLean- 


-Sides 


Teacher 


Asheville. 


Clara B. — Freeman 


—Taylor 


Teacher 


Pinehurst. 


Lillian Chesnutt... 




Stenographer 


Cleveland, 0. 


A. A. Smith 








W. M. Mitchell 




Minister 


Manchester. 


x M. M. Hines 




Merchant 


Rocky Mount. 


E. J. Campbell 






Fall River Line 


x Virginia— Scott— 


Williams 


Housekeeper 


Fayetteville. 


R. McN. Williams.. 




Carpenter 


Wilmington. 



1887 



Housekeeper Fayetteville. 

General Officer A. M. E. Z. ch. Philadelphia 

Housekeeper | Fayetteville 

! New York. 

I Connecticut 

Teacher Goldsboro. 

Housekeeper Fayetteville. 

Housekeeper j Fayetteville. 

Shoemaker i Fayetteville. 



FAYETTEVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA. 

GRADUATES— Continued. 
1887 



33 



W. H. Jones 

Fannie E. Halliday 

Cornelia Jones 

Henry Green 

L. A. Patrick 



Occupation. 



Shoemaker . 

Teacher 

Teacher 



Minister Florida 



Rocky Mount . 
Fayetteville. 



1888 



H. M. Williams 


Ass'tPrin. City Graded School 


Fayetteville. 




Trucker 






Housekeeper 

































1889 









Lilly Scott 

R. H. White 


Housekeeper 

Teacher 


Washington, D. C. 






Lizzie — McNeill — Wilkerson 


Housekeeper 


Fayetteville. 



1890 



A. D. Williston 


Civil Engineer 


Tuskegee, Ala. 








x Eva S. Mabry 


Teacher 


Raleigh. 


Carrie (Thornton) Fairley 


Housekeeper 


Kinston. 


J. S. Lemmon 


Teacher 


Whiteville. 


R. H. Williams 


Teacher 


Fayetteville. 


Josie (Tucker) Womble 


Housekeeper 


Fayetteville. 


Florrie Williams Greene 


Housekeeper 


Charlotte. 



(0 



34 



STATE COLORED NORMAL SCHOOL, 

GRADUATES— Continued. 
1890 



Name. 


Occupation. 


Postoffice. 




Rosa (Scott) Brunson 

Evie Henderson 


Teacher 

Dressmaker 


Rcoky Mount. 
Fayetteville. 


' 



1891 



0. H. Hines , 


Physician 


„ 


H. C. Scurlock 


Professor Howard University.. 


Washington. 


J. T. Kerr 






Robert Scott , 


Porter 












A. H. Hines 


Teacher 






1893 



Katie W. (Williston) Peterson 


Teacher 


Fayetteville. 


L. H. Bizzell 




Fayetteville. 


I.B.Hall.. 


Silk Operative 


Fayetteville. 


S. H. Wilson 


Physician 









1894 



R. S. Halliday 


Physician 


Statesville. 


Fannie I. Mitchell 


Housekeeper 


Laurinburg. 


Fannie D. Payne 

Mary A. Murphy 




| 


Teacher 




Eliza E. Dixon 


Teacher 


[ Hope Mills. 



FAYETTEVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA. 



35 



GRADUATES— Continued. 
1895 



Name. 


Occupation. 


Postoffice. 








Roena B. (Jacobs) Perry 

Mary E. (Barney) Chavis.. 

Sarah B. (Williams) Ray 


Housekeeper 

Housekeeper 

Housekeeper 


New York City, 

Fayetteville. 

Benson. 



H. C McDongld 


Teacher 


J Live Oak, Fla. 




Teacher 


Suffolk, Va. 







1897 



0. B. Raiford 


Clerk in Silk Mill 


Fayetteville. 








Nettie Williston 


Teacher 


Fayetteville. 


Sarah Chesnutt 


Teacher 




J. J. Hines 


Principal 


Hamlet. 


Rachel W.— Pickett— Simpson 


Housekeeper 


Fayetteville. 


Cora M. Wilkins 


Stenographer 


New York City. 














F. A. Flemming 


Proprietor Barber Business 


Fayetteville. 



1900 



Sadie Bowman 

Laurena J. Smith 
i T. C. Drake 

ce G. Bryai 
nie E. Ches 
ma W. Gill 

i Deceased 



Housekeeper.. 

Teacher 

Pharmacist... 



Hartford, Conn. 

Fayetteville. 

Greensboro. 



1901 





Teacher 




Annie E. Chesnutt 

Emma W. Gill 


Teacher 


Fayetteville. 









S^ 



36 



STATE COLORED NORMAL SCHOOL, 

GRADUATES— Continued. 

1901. 



Name 


Occupation. 


Postorfice. 


Eugenia W. Jacobs 


Teacher 


Thomasville. 


Mary E. Perry 


Teacher— Shaw 


Raleigh. 


Isadore G. Jacobs 


Clerk 


Durham. 


Annie E. Pickett 


Housekeeper 


Fayetteville. 




Teacher 




Lucretia R. Williams 


Teacher 




Fayetteville. 



1903 



J. E. Boykin 

Rosa W. Bayne 

Bertha J. Byrd... 

M. Grant Crumpler . 
Joseph F. Drake .... 

Theodosia Hall - 

Matttie McDougald . 

Harlma White 

Hattie Williams 

J. C. Gill 

J. S. Brown 

Alice V. McDaniel... 

A. J. Henderson 

T.J. Mitchell 

Harriet Kirk 

J. W. Mitchell 

Alberta Simmons... 

J. S. Perry 

Sallie D. Boykin ...... 

D. C. Gore 



Principal 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Business 

St. Augustine, 

Teacher 

Clerk in Silk Mill . 
Teacher 



Thomasville. 

Fayetteville. 

Wade. 

Macon, Ga. 

Fayetteville. 

Raleigh. 

Fayetteville. 

Fayetteville. 

Fayetteville. 



1904 



A. & M. College . 

Minister 

Seamstress 

Pharmacist 



Greensboro 
Rockingham. 
Fayetteville. 
Winston 



Housekeeper 

A. & M. College . 
Oberlin College... 
Shaw University 

Teacher 

Teacher 



Alderman. 

Greensboro. 

Oberlin, O. 

Raleigh 

Fayetteville. 

Supply. 



WWPF ■ 


- 


m Jn 


T 


■ ■vT 


Jfe^ 


kit* ^^ * ' 


win 




f ' 


11 ' ' "~"J 


■ J 







FAYETTEVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA. 

GRADUATES— Continued. 
1905 



37 



Name 


Occupation. 


Postoffice. 


Boisy W. Barnes 


A. &M. College 


Greensboro. 
Charlotte. 


Alice Freeman... 

Daniel C. Gore 


Silk Operative 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

A. & M. College 

Teacher 

Clerk 

Teacher 


Fayetteville. 
Supply. 


Pinkey C. McKay 

George W. McMillan 


Fayetteville, 


Henry T. McMillan' 

Pierre B. Price ■ 

John L. Simpson 

Sam'l W. Thaggard 


Lumber Bridge. 
Greensboro. 
White Oak. 
Fayetteville. 


Lena A. Wood. 


Fayetteville. 



1906 





Normal Institute 


Normal, Ala. 


John W. Black 


Teacher 


Red Springs. 






Oxford, Pa. 


John W. Flemming 


Teacher 


Clinton. 


Carrie B. Jiggetts 


Teacher 


Red Springs. 




Teacher 


Clarkton. 


A. H. McAllister 


Clerk 


Fayetteville. 


W. H. McLaughlin 


Laborer 


Fayetteville. 



1907. 









Ezekiel K. Patterson 


Teacher 


Falling Creek. 


Anthony T. Kennedy 


Teacher 


Falling Creek. 


Ella J. McNeill 


Teacher __._., 


Clarkton. 


Hattie (Brooks) Carroll 


Housekeeper 


Fayetteville. 


Flora Kate Goodman 


Teacher 


Fayetteville. 



vi> 



38 



STATE COLORED NORMAL SCHOOL 



GRADUATES— Continued. 









Name. 


Occupation. 


Postoffice. 


Minnie U. Waddell 


Teacher 


Fayetteville. 


Where the 


Students Come From. 



The students in attendance upon the school during the session 
came from three different States, thirteen Counties, thirty-six Postoffices 
one hundred and six different families, Eighty-seven of these families 
own their homes. 



Present Every Day. 



One student has been present every day for four consecutive ses- 
sions of eight months. Nine others were present every day during the 
session of 1908-'09. Forty -two others were not absent a day after entering 
school. Tardiness was reduced to a minimum. 



A 



V 



FAYETTEVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA. 



39 



OCCUPATION OF PARENTS. 



Students whose parents are Farmers 

Students whose parents are Carpenters 

Students whose parents are Mail Carriers 

Students whose parents are Merchants 

Students whose parents are Doctors ..., 

Students whose parents are Brick Masons 

Students whose parents are Hostlers 

Students whose parents are Barbers 

Students whose parents are Pilots 

Students whose parents are Painters 

Students whose parents are Coopers 

Students whose parents are Printers 

Students whose parents are Butchers 

Students whose parents are Watchmen 

Students whose parents are Firemen 

Students whose parents are Cooks 

Students whose parents are Laundresses 

Students whose parents are Housekeepers 

Students whose parents are Seamstresses 

Students whose parents are Mill Operatives 

Students whose parents are Moulders 

Students whose parents are Preachers 

Students whose parents are Teachers 

Students whose parents are Trained Nurses 

Students whose parents are Undertakers and Embalmers . 



25 
1 
2 



1 
1 



2 I 

1 









1 






<u ; o 

fa l H 

60 , 85 



4 

! 

*\ 

2 

S 


1 

1 | 

1 I 

l\ 

5 






1 





1 





1 


1 





1 


2 ! 


1 


1 j 





1 ! 


1 


! 



10 10 

1 
1 

1 
1 

3 
2 
1 

1 



Decrease in Illiteracy of the Colored People of the 
State. 





1880 


1890 


1900 


Total colored population 10 years of age and 
over... 

Total colored illiterates 10 years of age and 
over 

Percentage of colored illiteracy 


351,145 

271,943 
77.4 


392,589 

235,981 
60.11 


437,691 

210,344 
47.6 



Every son, whatever may be his expectations as to fortune, ought to 
be so educated that he can superintend some part of the complicated 
machinery of social life ; and every daughter ought to be so educated that 
she can answer the claims of humanity, whether these claims require the 
labor of the head or the labor of the hand. — Horace Mann. 

"The strength of every community is dependent upon the average of 
the intelligence of that community, and this intelligence is dependent upon 
the education of the entire mass and not of the few." — Charles B. Aycock. 

" To close the door of hope against any child within the borders of the 
State, whatever be his race or condition, by deliberately removing him 
from the possibility of securing such training as will fit him for the life 
he has to live, is un-Christian, un-Democratic and un-American." — Gov. 
N. C. Blanchari 



Other Information About the North Carolina State 

Normal School for the Negro Race, 

Fayetteville. 



SUMMARY OF INFORMATION. 



The School aims to reach, help and prepare as many Negroes as 
possible to teach in the public schools of the State and to become efficient 
workers along any line of honest endeavor. 

The Principal invites correspondence with parents, teachers, minis- 
ters, and young people who desire further information of the School. 

There is an increased demand for Normal School graduates as teachers. 
The Normal graduate does far better service as a teacher. 

The Principal keeps in touch with superintendents of schools, school 
officers, and teachers, and aids graduates in securing positions. 

The Normal has the best teaching force it can secure. The teaching 
hours are used for teaching. Students are not allowed to waste their time- 
It pays to be a student of the Fayetteville State Colored Normal School. 

Tuition is free to all persons who pledge themselves to teach in the 
public schools. The institution employs a few students and will get work 
for others who wish it, in the city. Students are advised to keep profitably 
employed. 

All arrangements for boarding and rooming are subject to the approval 
of the Principal, 

The Normal reading-room is fairly well supplied with daily and other 
current publications. 

The School library contains some carefully selected volumes. 

The best medical attention is promptly given in case of illness. 

Students should be well recommended by a minister, teacher, parent, 
or other person of good standing, before entering school. 

The daily session of school begins at 8:40 in the morning and ends at 
3:30 in the afternoon. The lunch period lasts thirty minutes — from 
12:30 to 1. 

The next session begins Monday, September 13, 1909. Students should 
enter the first day, and if possible remain throughout the session. 

Fill in the Application Blank and return it to the Principal as soon as 
possible. 

For further information, address 

E. E. SMITH, Principal 
State Normal School, 
Fayetteville, N. C. 



Office of the R ( 



JCristrai